new institute of legal study and advancement, inc.

985 5th avenue, apt 6a
new york, new york 10075

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JUNE 23, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4596523

County
NEW YORK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - NEW INSTITUTE OF LEGAL STUDY AND ADVANCEMENT, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Does your job title make donors want to avoid you?
    By Jeff Brooks - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    It's possible that your job title is so terrible, it's chasing donors away. That's what a new study by researcher Russell James finds, as reported on the MarketSmart blog, at Why fundraiser job titles suck and cost you a lot of money! The study asked people, "Who at the charity are you more likely to contact?" It gave them an array of typical nonprofit job titles. The title that fewest people wanted to contact: Director of Advancement. Others people didn't want to get in touch with: Chief Advancement Officer Director of Institutional Advancement Chief Institutional Advancement Officer Think you can...

    Source: Future Fundraising Now
  • “It’s Shame On Us If We Blow It”: Highlights From NY Seizes the Momentum
    By Ben Fidler - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Mike Foley, a drug industry veteran and director of the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, has a pointed message for the New York life sciences industry: Don’t waste the moment. Changing the course of New York biotech has been a saga that dates back to the 1990s, and as Xconomy has detailed, progress has been made […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • Huff, puff, pass? AG's pot fury not echoed by task force
    By SADIE GURMAN, Associated Press - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    The Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety, a group of prosecutors and federal law enforcement officials, has come up with no new policy recommendations to advance the attorney general's aggressively anti-marijuana views.Some advocates and members of Congress had feared the task force's recommendations would give Sessions the green light to begin dismantling what has become a sophisticated, multimillion-dollar pot industry that helps fund schools, educational programs and law enforcement.The vague recommendations may be intentional, reflecting an understanding that shutting down the entire industry is neither palatable nor possible, said John Hudak, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution who studies marijuana law and was interviewed by members of the task force.The report suggests teaming the Justice Department with Treasury officials to offer guidance to financial institutions, telling them to implement robust anti-money laundering programs and report suspicious transactions involving businesses in states where pot is legal.[...] it tells officials to develop "centralized guidance, tools and data related to marijuana enforcement," two years after the Government Accountability Office told the Justice Department it needs to better document how it's tracking the effect of marijuana legalization in the states.Most critically, and without offering direction, it says officials "should evaluate whether to maintain, revise or rescind" a set of Obama-era memos that allowed states to legalize marijuana on the condition that officials act to keep it from migrating to places where it is still outlawed and out of the hands of criminal cartels and children.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Countering Cybersecurity Turnover: 57 Companies That Do It Best
    By Bruce V. Bigelow - Thursday Jun 1, 2017

    What does it take to keep highly skilled cybersecurity employees? Salary and benefits are table-stakes. Challenging work, ongoing training, an opportunity to advance without having to become a manager, and a talented peer group all help companies recruit and retain these sought-after “ninjas”—the individuals who can do what artificial intelligence security tools can’t. Research from […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
new institute of legal study and advancement inc new york ny