liberty international future electronics and gifts inc.

53-11 90th street, suite 2f
elmhurst, new york 11373

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 27, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4379727

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
AMER NOVAK CALEB
53-11 90TH STREET, SUITE 2F
ELMHURST, NEW YORK, 11373

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - LIBERTY INTERNATIONAL FUTURE ELECTRONICS AND GIFTS INC.









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  • Around the Web

  • MTV Mines the Past for Its Future: ‘Total Request Live’
    By JOHN KOBLIN - Sunday Jul 30, 2017

    Remember the “TRL” studio and crowds in Times Square? Music? Carson Daly? MTV hopes you do, and will tune in again.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • At Walmart Academy, Training Better Managers. But With a Better Future?
    By MICHAEL CORKERY - Tuesday Aug 8, 2017

    A new program for store supervisors and department managers may make them better employees but may not help them reach the middle class.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Uber’s C.E.O. Pick, Dara Khosrowshahi, Steps Into Brighter Spotlight
    By DAVID STREITFELD and NELLIE BOWLES - Monday Aug 28, 2017

    Mr. Khosrowshahi has many tasks ahead of him, including repairing Uber’s internal culture and preparing the company for a self-driving future.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • The Top 10 Moments of New York Fashion Week
    By THE NEW YORK TIMES - Friday Sep 15, 2017

    Highlights from the shows, including a celebrity-packed front row at Calvin Klein and a trek to Bedford Hills, N.Y., to see Ralph Lauren’s vintage cars.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Face scans for Americans flying abroad stir privacy issues
    By Frank Bajak and David Koenig - Wednesday Jul 12, 2017

    HOUSTON — If the Trump administration gets its way, all Americans boarding international flights will have to submit to a face scan, a plan privacy advocates call an ill-advised step toward a surveillance state.[...] DHS says it’s finally ready to implement face scans on departure — focused mainly on better tracking visa overstays but also on tightening security.“The only way for an individual to ensure he or she is not subject to collection of biometric information when traveling internationally is to refrain from traveling,” says the June 12 document available on the website of Customs and Border Protection, which runs the DHS program.John Wagner, the Customs and Border Protection deputy executive assistant commissioner in charge of the program, confirmed in an interview that U.S. citizens departing on international flights will submit to face scans.Privacy advocates say making the scans mandatory for U.S. citizens pushes the nation toward a Big Brother future of pervasive surveillance where local and state police and federal agencies, and even foreign governments, could leverage “digital faceprints” to track citizens wherever they go.Jay Stanley, an American Civil Liberties Union senior policy analyst, says U.S. law enforcement and security agencies already exert “sufficient gravitational pulls in wanting to record and track what masses of individuals are doing,” he says.A network of government databases collects face scans — which computers read as mathematical formulas, or algorithms, from mug shots, driver’s licenses and other images.In an October report, the Georgetown center estimated more than one in four U.S. state and local law enforcement agencies can run or request face recognition searches — on their own or others’ databases —and said federal agencies including the DEA, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the IRS have all had access to one or more state or local face recognition systems.The FBI alone has more than 30 million photos in a single database, and New York state recently announced it would begin scanning the faces of drivers entering New York City bridges and tunnels.Another DHS initiative worrying privacy advocates is TSA’s Precheck, the voluntary program designed to speed enrollees through airport security with more than 5 million enrollees.Participants are not being told the digital fingerprints and biographical data they submit for background checks when enrolling are retained in an FBI identity database for life, said Jeramie Scott, an attorney with the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a public interest nonprofit.Since last month, trials that let enrollees use a digital fingerprint scanner to speed through TSA security are under way in Atlanta and Denver.In written testimony to Congress in May, Customs said U.S. citizens leaving on international flights cannot be exempted from face scans because: “First, it is not feasible to require airlines to have two separate boarding processes for U.S. citizens and non-U.S. citizens, and second, to ensure U.S. citizen travelers are the true bearer of the passport they are presenting for travel.”

    Source: SFGATE.com: Business and Technology News
  • Face scans for US citizens flying abroad stir privacy issues
    By FRANK BAJAK and DAVID KOENIG, Associated Press - Wednesday Jul 12, 2017

    HOUSTON (AP) — If the Trump administration gets its way, U.S. citizens boarding international flights will have to submit to a face scan, a plan privacy advocates call a step toward a surveillance state.John Wagner, the Customs deputy executive assistant commissioner in charge of the program, confirmed in an interview that U.S. citizens departing on international flights will submit to face scans.Privacy advocates say making the scans mandatory for U.S. citizens pushes the nation toward a Big Brother future of pervasive surveillance where local and state police and federal agencies, and even foreign governments, could leverage citizens collected "digital faceprints" to track them wherever they go.Jay Stanley, an American Civil Liberties Union senior policy analyst, says U.S. law enforcement and security agencies already exert "sufficient gravitational pulls in wanting to record and track what masses of individuals are doing," he says.In an October report,  the Georgetown center estimated more than one in four U.S. state and local law enforcement agencies can run or request face-recognition searches and federal agencies including the IRS have all had access to one or more state or local face recognition systems.The FBI alone has more than 30 million photos in a single database, and New York state recently announced it would begin scanning the faces of drivers entering New York City bridges and tunnels.Another DHS initiative worrying privacy advocates is TSA's Precheck, the voluntary program designed to speed enrollees through airport security with more than 5 million enrollees.Participants are not being told the digital fingerprints and biographical data they submit for background checks when enrolling are retained in an FBI identity database  for life, said Jeramie Scott, an attorney with the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a public interest nonprofit.Since last month, trials  that let enrollees use a digital fingerprint scanner to speed through TSA security are underway in Atlanta and Denver.In written testimony  to Congress in May, CBP said U.S. citizens leaving on international flights cannot be exempted from face scans because 1 It's not practical to run separate boarding systems for citizens and non-citizens and 2 Scanning U.S. citizens' passports will ensure they don't travel on a passport not their own.[...] concerns shouldn't stop the government from moving ahead with the program and U.S. citizens have already sacrificed considerable privacy as the price of fighting terrorists, said Dan Stein, president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, which promotes restrictions on immigration.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories