law offices of lee r. samowitz, p.c.

40 south washington street
port washington, new york 11050

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 24, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4641101

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - LAW OFFICES OF LEE R. SAMOWITZ, P.C.









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