kayderock associates limited liability company

p.o. box 32
rock city falls, new york 12863

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 17, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4432293

County
SARATOGA

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - KAYDEROCK ASSOCIATES LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY









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