harvard consulting group, LLC

111 harvard road
scarsdale, new york 10583

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 05, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4538809

County
WESTCHESTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
ATHANAS PRIFTI
111 HARVARD ROAD
SCARSDALE, NEW YORK, 10583

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - HARVARD CONSULTING GROUP, LLC









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