green hill carpet recycling & recovery, inc.

80 state street
albany, new york 12207

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JUNE 21, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4421429

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
CORPORATION SERVICE COMPANY
80 STATE STREET
ALBANY, NEW YORK, 12207

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - GREEN HILL CARPET RECYCLING & RECOVERY, INC.









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