geologic land surveying, pLLC

59 carpenter avenue apt. a
mount kisco, new york 10549

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 24, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4393123

County
WESTCHESTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - GEOLOGIC LAND SURVEYING, PLLC









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  • Around the Web

  • Listing of the Day: Mount Kisco
    Friday Jun 23, 2017

    Original architectural features of the 1927 house include hardwood floors, high ceilings, a grand center-hall staircase, crown moldings and five working fireplaces.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • ‘The Great Quake,’ by Henry Fountain
    By Mary Ellen Hannibal - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    Many of us remember the epic ground-shaking of the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, and no matter how many teams of engineers tell us not to, we worry about being anywhere near the sinking Millennium Tower when the next big one hits.Fountain, a reporter and editor at the New York Times, focuses much of his narrative on George Plafker, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist, who teased out lessons from the Good Friday quake to help establish fundamental concepts about the deep workings of the Earth.An unassuming technician who spent eight years of his childhood in a Brooklyn orphanage, Plafker is an everyman distinguished by curiosity and persistence.Fountain memorably evokes an era in which impoverished students happily crowded around their Svengali to hear tall geological tales while consuming beer, beans and bread at the Clam Broth House on Newark Avenue in Hoboken, N.J.The story of Plafker’s path to the Alaska quake is interspersed with a narrative explanation of how science has grappled with the shapes and placement of the continents and how they got that way.Wegener opined that the Earth was once comprised of a single supercontinent, a giant land mass he called Pangaea.[...] to the painstaking process by which science arrives at its certainties, an earthquake takes just a few minutes to reorder reality.Fountain sets the scene for an abrupt wake-up call, and his description of how it unfolds is gripping.Shock waves tore through pavement and buildings, and the land resembled a stormy sea.Frank Press, the head of the seismology lab at the California Institute of Technology, concluded that the quake was caused by a “dip-slip” fault, in which one block of crust moves past another vertically.Pressure mounts where the oceanic crust of the Earth slides under the continental crust, building friction until the strain becomes so great that there is a “sudden release of an enormous amount of stored up energy.”

    Source: SFGATE.com: Entertainment News
  • Why Two Major Earthquakes Hit Mexico, Explained
    By MATT STEVENS - Wednesday Sep 20, 2017

    Two powerful quakes, 12 days apart, have killed hundreds of people in Mexico this month. We look at how, where and why the big ones happen.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Mexico City Quake Jolts Complacency Over Code Enforcement
    By AZAM AHMED, MARINA FRANCO and HENRY FOUNTAIN - Saturday Sep 23, 2017

    The seismic activity of Tuesday’s earthquake differed from a far more devastating quake in 1985. Enforcement of stronger building codes is lax.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • 6 earthquakes rattle Northern California on Thursday
    By Michelle Robertson - Friday Sep 15, 2017

    A quartet of small earthquakes shook Northern California on Thursday, including three rattlers about 9 miles northeast of San Jose, says the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Bay Area News
  • Most Powerful Quake to Hit Mexico in 100 Years Sparks Tsunami Warning
    By Richie Duchon and Rima Abdelkader and Alexander Smith and Kurt Chirbas and Alex Johnson and Associated Press - Friday Sep 8, 2017

    "This is a large quake. I'm sure that it will be widely felt — and possibly damaging," said Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Source: NBC News