fruit & labor design LLC

21-22 45th avenue
long island city, new york 11101

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 15, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4513899

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - FRUIT & LABOR DESIGN LLC









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  • Around the Web

  • Women of Sex Tech, Unite
    By ANNA NORTH - Friday Aug 18, 2017

    New York is becoming a cultural center for young women trying to disrupt the male-dominated industries of design engineering and sex toys.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • The Mayor and the Restaurateur: How de Blasio Sought Help for an Early Donor
    By WILLIAM NEUMAN and WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM - Monday Jul 24, 2017

    Federal investigators, while declining to prosecute, still questioned City Hall’s conduct. Was the administration doing favors for contributors?

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • A partnership to design San Francisco’s future
    By Deborah Cullinan - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    Focusing on inquiry and our promise to be the creative home for civic action, we invited people — artists, designers, planners and more — to discuss and debate that question.[...] by gathering diverse perspectives around this line of inquiry, we produced a cascading series of answers that made an impact far beyond the arts.[...] this abundant conversation led to new ways of thinking about how our cities change, and it opened the door to a groundbreaking partnership between our center and the San Francisco Planning Department.Each year we invite artists, engineers, athletes, scientists, teachers, activists and other creative changemakers who are leading cultural movements to an event called the YBCA100 Summit.A final platform involves civic coalitions that create lasting change and policy shifts.In response to questions of equity and labor, YBCA’s Youth Fellows partnered with the Healthy Corner Store Coalition and developed a Tenderloin Food Justice community art campaign in collaboration with residents in the Tenderloin, one of our city’s most socially and economically challenged neighborhoods and a food desert.During their school-year-long fellowships, the participating teens designed and installed art interventions specifically for the Tenderloin’s Mid City Market, one of five convenience stores that the Tenderloin Healthy Corner Store Coalition has recently converted into a place filled with fresh fruits and vegetables.YBCA also helped create the Tenderloin People’s Garden, a community space bringing together hundreds of volunteers of all ages, ethnicities and cultures to grow food — and offering their garden as a place for Tenderloin youth and their families to build knowledge and community.Since membership is about citizenship — about being part of an institution — people should be invited to participate at whatever price they can afford, so that our arts center can be about igniting inclusive, lasting forward momentum.Arts institutions of all shapes and sizes across our country have the creative resources needed to inspire us to participate in our struggling democracy, to fuel our public imagination.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Opinion pieces
  • Cue the Carrots! Strike up the Squash!
    By ANNIE CORREAL - Tuesday Aug 15, 2017

    The musicians of the Long Island Vegetable Orchestra make their instruments from things that grow in the garden.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Sunday Routine: How Helen Uffner, Vintage Clothing Expert, Spends Her Sundays
    By ABIGAIL MEISEL - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    She’s found retro outfits for Meryl Streep and Kate Winslet. On Sundays, the period clothing specialist visits flea markets and estate sales.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • By Design: The New Wave in Floral Arrangements
    By LINDSAY TALBOT - Thursday Aug 31, 2017

    For the most innovative designers working today, form is just as important as flora.

    Source: NYT > Home Page