fresh & pure cafe corp.

58 west 36th st.
new york, new york 10018

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 22, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4349219

County
NEW YORK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - FRESH & PURE CAFE CORP.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • WGN America Lands Crime Dramas ‘100 Code,’ ‘Pure’ and ‘Shoot the Messenger’
    By Tim Molloy, provided by
    - Tuesday Aug 8, 2017

    The network has secured the U.S. rights for three crime-focused shows — “100 Code,” “Shoot the Messenger,” and “Pure” — which will join the previously announced Anna Paquin-fronted “Bellevue” to add to the network’s stash of “primecrime” programming.When a high school hockey star wrestling with his gender identity goes missing and all signs point to foul play, Detective Annie Ryder (Anna Paquin) must unravel all the pieces to this gripping mystery before her own life falls apart.A gritty political-crime thriller centering on the complex relationships between crime reporters and the police, “Shoot the Messenger” follows Daisy Channing (Elyse Levesque), a young reporter trying to balance a messy personal life with a burgeoning career. Things begin to go sideways for Daisy when she witnesses a murder she thinks is gang related, only to find herself slowly drawn into an interconnected web of criminal and illicit sexual activity that reaches into the corridors of corporate and political power.With help from her editor Mary Foster (Alex Kingston), co-worker Simon Olenski (Lucas Bryant), and lead homicide detective Kevin Lutz (Lyriq Bent), Daisy uncovers a cover-up so scandalous it could bring down the government.“Shoot the Messenger” is produced by Jennifer Holness and Victoria Woods for Hungry Eyes Film & Television Inc. in association with CBC Television and ITV Studios Global Entertainment.Inspired by true events, “Pure” is the journey of Noah Funk-newly elected Mennonite pastor-who is determined to rid his community of the scourge of drugs and its nefarious ties to a transborder smuggling alliance with ruthless Mexican cocaine cartels. NY, “Justified” as Detective Bronco Novak; and Oscar and Golden Globe Nominee Rosie Perez (“Search Party,” White Men Can’t Jump) as DEA Agent Phoebe O’Reilly.Developed by Academy Award winner Bobby Moresco (Crash, Million Dollar Baby), “100 Code” stars Dominic Monaghan (“Lost,” Lord of the Rings Trilogy) as New York Detective Tommy Conley and the late Michael Nyqvist (John Wick, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) as the by-the-book Swedish detective Mikael Eklund.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • Harvey Techies Pass Baton, And APIs, To Florida Peers as Irma Nears
    By Angela Shah - Friday Sep 8, 2017

    Houston—As Tropical Storm Harvey made landfall in Houston, Florida resident Leah Halbina messaged friends in the city asking how she could help. That was how she found out about Sketch City and the various civic tech projects the group and others were developing to aid rescue efforts, help people find shelter, and tend to other […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Near The East River, Plans Emerge For NY’s Next Life Science Center
    By Ben Fidler - Monday Aug 21, 2017

    At a time when biotech incubators and shared spaces are beginning to multiply in Manhattan, work on what could rank among the city’s largest biotech centers—if it can all come together—is just getting underway. According to Paul Wexler, a longtime healthcare-focused real estate broker, construction should begin next year on what is being called the […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • Taste of Antigua: Mayan influence drives rising food scene
    By Margo Pfeiff - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    The morning sun has barely peeked up, but Antigua’s Mayan farmers’ market is already swarming with action, a chaotic kaleidoscope of vendors in vivid traditional clothing selling their produce. Guiding me through the Technicolor maze, chef Kenny Aldana points out neon-orange cashew fruit; avocados, mangoes and melons of all sizes and shapes; edible flowers; fresh fish; and meats including bizarre displays of dried iguanas. Bags filled, we return to the El Convento boutique hotel where Aldana holds court in the kitchen. At noon he delivers a market-sourced gourmet feast — chicken bathed in a luscious sauce of pepitoria (traditional roasted and ground squash seeds) with local izote flowers, baby zucchinis and a slice of jicama-like ichuntal lightly battered and fried, perched in a puddle of tomato puree with mild chile. Antigua, with its 18th century cobblestone streets and colonial Spanish architecture that earned it UNESCO World Heritage stature, has long been a cultural destination, charming and walkable with courtyards tucked off main avenues opening into lavish gardens, restaurants, bars and small hotels. “Guatemala is very diverse culturally, and cooks are starting to gain a sense of pride about it,” says New York and Argentina-trained local chef Rodrigo Aguilar, who specializes in pop up restaurants. Recently, a wave of younger cooks is showing our roots in a more globalized way, embracing change but respecting tradition by exploring the richness of our ingredients. The 5,029-foot altitude provides consistent temperatures between 76 and 82 degrees, an idyllic climate the early Spanish dubbed “eternal spring”, perfect for growing just about anything. After an insightful two-hour tour of the mountainside facilities, I sip the premium roast on the sunny dining terrace with a lively group of international caffeine enthusiasts. En route, church bells ring and horse-drawn carriages clatter across cobblestones beneath blossoming jacaranda trees raining mauve petals onto the sidewalk. Exotic hot pink and purple bursts of bougainvillea clamber over stone walls, and the air is filled with the smells of coffee, warm chocolate, tortillas, fresh bread and pastries. Frequent roof-rattling earthquakes that eventually persuaded the Spanish to move their capital to more stable Guatemala City have left picturesque remnants of convents, monasteries, churches, a prison and villas now repurposed as settings for pop-up restaurants, live music concerts, souvenir markets and movie screenings. Earthquakes are the growling side effect of three enormous steep-sided, often-active volcanoes that form the city’s backdrop. “The minerals in volcanic soil are responsible for our intensely flavorful produce,” explains Karin Rudberg of Caoba Farm, an organic farm/shop/learning center and cafe 20 minutes by foot from Antigua’s main square. Caoba also supplies many of Antigua’s best dining spots, and they are a diverse lot, from gourmet delis with innovative lunches like Epicure to traditional Guatemalan and European restaurants or those experimenting with various degrees of fusion. Sabe Rico — “tastes good” — is a welcoming warren of enterprise that includes a local deli, an on-site chocolateria, and a restaurant where fresh, healthy and often vegetarian takes on traditional dishes from enchiladas to chili rellenos are served amid a tropical garden. “I researched food vendors for six months, because I knew people wanted to try street food, but were afraid to get sick,” she says. Street food is actually illegal in Guatemala, but she guides guests to hole-in-the-wall mom-and-pop treasures and through the farmers’ market, where she whips out her Swiss Army knife for tasting bites. Prowling the shop-lined streets, I come across a chocolate museum and the remarkable Dulceria Doña María Gordillo, a landmark 1872 store decorated in religious relics and famous throughout Guatemala for its vast selection of artisan sweets made exactly as nuns did in the city for centuries to raise money. There are macaroons and marzipan, fig delights and candied squash in exquisite forms, but the addictive classic convent candy that will forever haunt me and many expat Guatemalans is canillitas de leche — literally “legs of milk” that melt in your mouth. Fat Cat lists a dozen ways you can have your coffee created, from French press and AeroPress to siphon and Chemex, along with an equally long list of local plantations from which beans are sourced. The coffee is so fresh and smooth that one day I couldn’t resist hitting three cafes, including La Parada and the Refuge, before heading to the rooftop Antigua Brewing Company bar for a craft beer to calm my caffeinated nerves with skyline views of volatile volcanoes. “Pour a little cusha on the floor for the dead,” Jose Mario Aguirre of La Cantina instructs me as a local crowd of hipsters settles into his funky, barn-board bar that, in the afternoon, morphs into an offbeat mixology workshop. The Mayan Drinks and Spirits School introduces keen liquor enthusiasts to cusha, a traditional and largely clandestine Mayan drink distilled from corn and fruit. “Usually we make pepian, tortillas, Guatemalan rice, a plantain desert and a corn flower drink called atol blanco,” says manager Anna Lena Hofmann. There are also frequent daily two-hour tours of the coffee plantations, processing facilities, roasters and including a tasting: $20. Garden cafe features farm-to-table cuisine for lunch and occasional dinners, often with live music.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Kellogg's Opens Cereal Cafe in New York's Times Square
    Friday Jul 1, 2016

    Kellogg's opens its first-ever restaurant, a cereal café, in New York City's Times Square on July 4. The menu features playful recipes developed by Momofuku Milk Bar chef Christina Tosi, and build-your-own-bowl options. Video: Carly Marsh/The Wall Street Journal, Photo: Whitney Tressel for The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Greater New York
  • Reality star: Dad is third wheel in my ‘pure’ relationship with NBA rookie
    By Jaclyn Hendricks - Wednesday Jul 19, 2017

    "Chrisley Knows Best" starlet Savannah Chrisley is currently dating Detroit Pistons rookie Luke Kennard.

    Source: New York Post: Sports
fresh amp pure cafe corp new york ny