forest gourmet deli grocery corp.

2236 forest avenue
store 8
staten island, new york 10303

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 15, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4514051

County
RICHMOND

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - FOREST GOURMET DELI GROCERY CORP.









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