blue ice hookah lounge inc.

319 oak street
uniondale, new york 11553

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 14, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4606142

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - BLUE ICE HOOKAH LOUNGE INC.









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  • Around the Web

  • When Bad Drinks Go Good
    By ROBERT SIMONSON - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    The Long Island iced tea, the Midori sour, the Blue Hawaii: Fussy bartenders are upgrading these decidedly down-market cocktails.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • ICE arrests 114 in NY operation targeting fugitives, illegal immigrants
    By foxnewsonline@foxnews.com (Fox News Online) - Wednesday Jul 26, 2017

    Source: Fox News
  • Jana Takes Stake in Blue Apron
    Monday Aug 14, 2017

    The activist hedge fund whose investment in Whole Foods Market Inc. catalyzed the natural grocer’s takeover by Amazon.com Inc. has taken a 2% stake in meal-kit maker Blue Apron Holdings Inc.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: U.S. Business
  • In Angelina Jolie’s New Movie, a Child’s-Eye View of War
    By BEN KENIGSBERG - Wednesday Sep 13, 2017

    “First They Killed My Father” depicts life under the Khmer Rouge in a film taken from Loung Ung’s memoir.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Man says ‘hookah-smoking caterpillar’ sent him on liquor store forklift rampage
    By Joshua Rhett Miller - Monday Aug 14, 2017

    A hookah-smoking caterpillar told him to do it. That’s the explanation a Florida man — who initially identified himself as “Alice Wonderland” — provided to police after allegedly using a forklift to inflict $128,000 in damage on an under-construction liquor store in Crestview on Saturday. He later identified himself as Mathew Horace Jones, 32, of...

    Source: New York Post: News
  • Quebec a Canadian haven for quirky hotels
    By Margo Pfeiff - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    The handful of remaining elderly nuns then donated the building to a nonprofit organization that, after renovations, opened it in 2015 as a luxury 65-room hotel, retreat and wellness center. Once home to over 200 nuns, the elegant and unusual hotel is a blend of old and new, the no-frills monastery style converting well into a chic minimalist design with whitewashed walls, exposed wooden beams and floors, and wide hallways lined with portraits and statues leading to quiet retreats for meditation. The secular hotel’s mission is to carry on the Augustine philosophies of rejuvenating and healing its guests, now through meditation, aromatherapy, massage, yoga, holistic workshops and healthy food. For a true historical experience, I stay in one of Le Monastere’s 33 “authentic” rooms, simple former nuns’ quarters with Augustinian furniture and a single bed. An organic breakfast is served in the bright dining room in silence, according to monastery tradition, and I feel myself starting to unwind. Stepping down worn and creaky steps, I explore the hospital and Augustine museum with over 40,000 artifacts on the main floor, then head downstairs again into the massive new archives with more than half a mile of original manuscripts. The modern hotel celebrates indigenous connections, from rooms artfully decorated with fox and beaver pelts to the subtle flavors of wild herbs from the boreal forest on the lunch and dinner plates of their restaurant. Guests can join the daily Labrador tea ceremony in the lobby, learn how to make bannock, go dog sledding, strap on snowshoes to track caribou or sleep in the longhouse with a modern hotel room as a backup for convenience. In La Traite restaurant, renowned Quebec chef Martin Gagné offers multicourse tasting menus to highlight his creative takes on traditional native cuisine. The food is seasonal and might feature elk tartare, smoked eel, Quebec scallops with sea urchin butter, wild cattails with spicy birch syrup, red deer osso buco perfumed with bog myrtle or a fillet of seal. Quebec’s provincial park service — SEPAQ — has always dreamed up inspired ways to help people enjoy the wilderness with various levels of comfort in their 23 parks and nine wildlife reserves. The 320-square-foot studio layout of blond wood has a sleek Scandinavian feel and includes a well-equipped kitchen and compact bathroom with shower. There is electricity, hot water, wallboard heating, bean bag chairs for lounging in front of a small wood-burning stove, and a welcoming hammock swinging inside a screened porch. The cabins are available year round, and before I leave I’m already planning an EXP cross-country ski and snowshoe excursion when the snowflakes start falling. Just 30 minutes north of the city, North America’s only Ice Hotel since 2001 has 44 rooms and suites, each themed with different super-clear ice sculptures. The dazzling grand lobby and its chandelier, the chapel where you can tie the knot with the bride wearing a white fur coat, the three bars — and even the glass from which I sip local ice cider — are all made of ice. There’s also a modern hotel where every Ice Hotel guest has a backup room for modern conveniences. After a warm-up sauna and hot tub I head to my ice bed in a spectacular room with icebergs, polar bears and seals swimming along icy blue walls that can be up to four feet thick. Though the inside temperature is 41 F, the wooden frame and thermal mattress atop my ice bed and a weapons-grade down sleeping bag keep me warm throughout the night, dreaming about living atop an ice floe. Longhouse overnight package from $560 per night for a minimum of four people includes the cultural experience, a hotel room for modern conveniences and breakfast. Various packages and promotions might include activities from dog sledding to access to the adjacent Valcartier theme park complex including an indoor water park. www.valcartier.com/en/winter-playground Sleep in a suspended spheres or a glass geodesic dome in forest alongside Saguenay Fjord, 2 hours and 45 minutes northeast of Quebec City. Mont Tremblant Treehouses: 5000, ch. du Lac-Caribou, Saint-Faustin-Lac-Carré, Québec, 1-819 681-4994; www.refugesperches.com/en/our-treehouses Selection of tree houses in the Laurentian Mountains 1 hour 45 minutes north of Montreal. Three, four and six-course tasting menus often featuring unconventional First Nations’ ingredients prepared in an elegant fine dining restaurant by renowned Quebec chef, Martin Gagné.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel