big brand theory communication, LLC

42 ashland avenue
buffalo, new york 14222

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
NOVEMBER 06, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4483038

County
ERIE

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - BIG BRAND THEORY COMMUNICATION, LLC









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Buffalo Theory: 30 beers on tap, and Asian inspired American food
    By Michael Bauer - Monday Oct 10, 2016

    Photo: John Storey/Special to The Chronicle Image 1of/19 CaptionClose Image 1 of 19 Buffalo Theory has 30 beers on tap. Buffalo Theory has 30 beers on tap. Photo: John Storey/Special to The Chronicle Image 2 of 19 The food is well designed to go with the beer including meatballs made with buffalo meat and Asian spices. The food is well designed to go with the beer including meatballs made with buffalo meat and Asian spices. Photo: John Storey/Special to The Chronicle Image 3 of 19 The restaurants symbol. The restaurants symbol. Photo: John Storey/Special to The Chronicle Image 4 of 19 Fish, No Chips is fried local anchovies. Fish, No

    Source: SFGATE.com: Michael Bauer
  • Little Games, Big Engagement
    Friday Sep 23, 2011

    One of the challenges brands often face when they look at getting into gaming is cost and time. Concepting a game people will actually play takes a great deal of time and specialized skills. Butsometimes, the simplest games can engage thousands of people if the right circumstances come together.

    Source: Media Post: Gaming Insider
  • Shareholders Demand More Drastic Shifts at Nestlé
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    The changes requested by the Third Point hedge fund underscore the idea that legacy food brands must radically shake up their portfolios to remain profitable.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Why bad brand architecture happens to good organizations
    Tuesday Oct 4, 2016

    As nonprofits grow and evolve over time, their brands can get complicated. Rather than maintaining one unified look, organizations often create new logos, names, and other unique elements for their programs and initiatives. More often than not, this happens because an organization lacks a strategic framework for managing its brand over time. Things can get very messy.

    Brand architecture is about defining and expressing the roles and relationships among the various brands and sub-brands of an organization. Sometimes having more complex brand architecture is the strategic thing to do, but usually, less is more.

    Managing a single brand successfully is a time-intensive discipline. Managing multiple brands can be nearly impossible—and usually not strategic—for most nonprofits. Complicating an organization’s brand architecture can be counter-productive—both for the staff managing the various brands internally and for the audiences the brands are intended to engage.

    What causes nonprofit brands to get so complicated and disconnected? We see two big reasons.

    Internal factors

    Without clear guidelines to follow (for instance, in the form of a brand guide or a communications director’s coaching), staff often take the opportunity to develop a new name, logo, color palette, or other elements for a program or initiative. They may feel it’s easier to do that than to navigate red tape, or they may be taking the opportunity to express their own personal tastes or vision for their program.

    Organizational silos can also cause issues when it comes to branding. Without strong internal communications, and the clear role of a communications team, brands can take on a life of their own.

    No matter the size of your organization's communication team—whether it’s one person or five—there should be a go-to person or “brand champion” you can seek approval and guidance from about the brand. They should also oversee a simple set of brand guidelines that all staff have access to and make sure new hires and old are clear what they are and how to use them. The brand champion should clearly communicate their role to staff and follow up regularly so that new and long-time staff members are reminded of the guidelines in place.

    External factors

    Brand architecture often gets complicated because of concerns about external perceptions or buy-in. Some of these concerns are less valid than others. For example, in an organization merger or acquisition, one organization may decide to keep the established identity of another in addition to its own to retain any brand equity it may have. Staff may feel like the risk of alienating or confusing longtime supporters by changing the identity of a program just isn’t worth it. Plenty of organizations also choose to name a program or facility in honor of a major donor or influential person in the organization’s history.

    Both approaches may seem wise in the short term but can cause branding complications long term. We recommend thinking about what brand architecture system is going to be clearest to your key audiences in the long term. Then work backwards to decide on what interim changes need to be made to your current brand to get there.

    Ultimately brand architecture is usually the result of unasked questions about whether all the various sub-brands under your organization’s umbrella are really necessary. To be able to navigate these decisions, define a brand architecture strategy that maps out guidelines for sub-branding. This should all be codified in your organization’s brand guide: your organization’s go-to resource for all things branding.

    Need help? Just give us a call! We regularly help larger organizations navigate these waters.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Brand Architecture: Our case study with the Union for Reform Judaism and other resources
    Wednesday Nov 9, 2016

    One of the big nonprofit communications topics that keeps surfacing this year is brand architecture. Midsize and larger organizations, in particular, are working harder than ever to connect the dots between myriad programs, events, and initiatives that have been too disjointed so they can communicate more clearly and cohesively.

    If this is a topic that’s surfacing at your organization, these blogs might be useful too:

    Don’t hesitate to give us a shout if you’re struggling to communicate cohesively across multiple programs and initiatives.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • The Power of Brand Personality for Your Nonprofit
    Tuesday Feb 28, 2017

    We all have distinct personalities—some of us are outgoing and whimsical, while others are nerdy and creative. Your nonprofit is no different. We believe that defining and using your organization’s brand personality can be a useful communications tool. In fact, your personality, when coupled with your positioning (the big idea you hope others might associate with your organization), is the heart of your brand strategy and the key to defining or refining your brand identity and experience.

    First things first, what is brand personality? Brand personality is the tone and style you use to guide your communications. It is a set of adjectives that describe the overarching feelings you want your community to associate with your organization. Think about the most recent Target commercial you’ve seen and how it made you feel. You might describe the retail brand as fun, lovable, pleasant, and charming, and that’s brand personality in action.

    Elements of your personality should come through in the tone and style of all of your communications. Writing a blog post? Designing a brochure? Check out the adjectives that make up your brand personality and decide if the communications look, feel, and sound true to your personality.

    An effective brand personality will help your nonprofit distinguish itself from its peers because it’s a list of characteristics that are only true to you. Used consistently, personality will become a core part of your brand, and audiences will immediately associate certain feelings with your work.

    Not sure where to start? Imagine you were asking a board members to set your organization up on a blind date with their close friend, a generous potential donor. How would you want that board member to describe you to their friend? Sure, you hope they’d reference your mission or elevator pitch, but what adjectives would you want them to use to get that donor excited to meet you? Everyone would like a nice, professional, and credible organization, but what’s so special about you that someone couldn’t wait to meet you for dinner (or go to your next gala)?

    I want to help you discover and apply your brand personality to your nonprofit. Join me on March 21 at this free 90-minute workshop, Fish or fowl? Establishing your nonprofit's brand personality, at The Foundation Center in Washington, DC. We’ll talk about brand personality, look at some examples, and walk through exercises to help you determine the characteristics that describe your nonprofit on its best day.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
big brand theory communication llc buffalo ny