anthemis pharmaceutical consultants corporation

745 zena highwoods road
town of woodstock
kingston, new york 12401

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
FEBRUARY 20, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4532169

County
ULSTER

Jurisdiction
NEW JERSEY

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
FOREIGN BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - ANTHEMIS PHARMACEUTICAL CONSULTANTS CORPORATION









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  • Around the Web

  • This chimp lived in a two-bedroom UWS apartment
    By Jane Ridley - Thursday Jun 29, 2017

    Buying a mountain of bananas at the local grocery store, Hester Mundis couldn’t help rolling her eyes when the assistant jokingly asked if she had a monkey at home. “I replied: ‘He’s not a monkey, he’s a chimp!’” says the 78-year-old writer, of Kingston, NY, who used to live on the Upper West Side with...

    Source: New York Post: Entertainment
  • WGN America Lands Crime Dramas ‘100 Code,’ ‘Pure’ and ‘Shoot the Messenger’
    By Tim Molloy, provided by
    - Tuesday Aug 8, 2017

    The network has secured the U.S. rights for three crime-focused shows — “100 Code,” “Shoot the Messenger,” and “Pure” — which will join the previously announced Anna Paquin-fronted “Bellevue” to add to the network’s stash of “primecrime” programming.When a high school hockey star wrestling with his gender identity goes missing and all signs point to foul play, Detective Annie Ryder (Anna Paquin) must unravel all the pieces to this gripping mystery before her own life falls apart.A gritty political-crime thriller centering on the complex relationships between crime reporters and the police, “Shoot the Messenger” follows Daisy Channing (Elyse Levesque), a young reporter trying to balance a messy personal life with a burgeoning career. Things begin to go sideways for Daisy when she witnesses a murder she thinks is gang related, only to find herself slowly drawn into an interconnected web of criminal and illicit sexual activity that reaches into the corridors of corporate and political power.With help from her editor Mary Foster (Alex Kingston), co-worker Simon Olenski (Lucas Bryant), and lead homicide detective Kevin Lutz (Lyriq Bent), Daisy uncovers a cover-up so scandalous it could bring down the government.“Shoot the Messenger” is produced by Jennifer Holness and Victoria Woods for Hungry Eyes Film & Television Inc. in association with CBC Television and ITV Studios Global Entertainment.Inspired by true events, “Pure” is the journey of Noah Funk-newly elected Mennonite pastor-who is determined to rid his community of the scourge of drugs and its nefarious ties to a transborder smuggling alliance with ruthless Mexican cocaine cartels. NY, “Justified” as Detective Bronco Novak; and Oscar and Golden Globe Nominee Rosie Perez (“Search Party,” White Men Can’t Jump) as DEA Agent Phoebe O’Reilly.Developed by Academy Award winner Bobby Moresco (Crash, Million Dollar Baby), “100 Code” stars Dominic Monaghan (“Lost,” Lord of the Rings Trilogy) as New York Detective Tommy Conley and the late Michael Nyqvist (John Wick, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) as the by-the-book Swedish detective Mikael Eklund.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • Stealthy NY Startup Rocket Pharma Merges With Inotek, Heads to Nasdaq
    By Ben Fidler - Tuesday Sep 12, 2017

    Rocket Pharmaceuticals, a stealthy gene therapy startup in New York City, has made its first splash. Through a merger with struggling Inotek Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: ITEK), Rocket, a company developing treatments for a variety of rare blood diseases, has taken itself public. Rocket shareholders are expected to own 81 percent of the combined company, with Inotek […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • The pop-up employer: Build a team, do the job, say goodbye
    By Noam Scheiber - Friday Jul 14, 2017

    There was a content division to churn out copy for game cards; graphic designers to devise the logo and the packaging; developers to build the mobile app and the website.True Story was a case study in what two Stanford professors call “flash organizations” — ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments.Temporary organizations capable of taking on complicated projects have existed for decades, of course, perhaps nowhere more prominently than in Hollywood, where producers assemble teams of directors, writers, actors, costume and set designers and a variety of other craftsmen and technicians to execute projects with budgets in the tens if not hundreds of millions.In principle, many companies would find it more cost-effective to increase staff members as needed than to maintain a permanent presence.There is some evidence that the corporate world, which has spent decades outsourcing work to contractors and consulting firms, is embracing temporary organizations.In 2007, Jody Miller, a former media executive and venture capitalist, was a co-founder of the Business Talent Group, which sets up temporary teams of freelancers for corporations.Some of Miller’s biggest clients are in the pharmaceutical industry, whose economics are not unlike Hollywood’s in that it is heavily project-based and a small handful of blockbusters drive most of the profits.Business Talent Group teams frequently work on the kickoff of a new drug — devising the strategy for reaching out to patient groups, journalists, doctors and insurers — and help pry open new markets for existing drugs.In entertainment, there is Artella, which helps freelance animators, sound designers and other talent form teams that produce animated features.In addition to True Story, the two professors enlisted one team that built an app to help emergency medical technicians communicate with hospitals, and another that built a Web tool to help a consulting firm run workshops for clients.First is that the platforms tend to be highly dependent on data and computing power.[...] is the importance of well-established roles.Sociologists and organizational theorists have marveled for decades at the way disaster response teams or emergency room trauma units pull off complex tasks, even if they have never met before, because the division of labor is understood.Dave Summa, who worked on a team that the Business Talent Group assembled to advise a major agribusiness company on which markets to compete in, said it fell to him to define the questions that needed answering and the mode of analysis, while a colleague oversaw teams of workers who produced specific plans.When the writers, who composed short poems for each game card, first submitted their work, he and his business partner had one overriding impression: “Most of the content was really bad,” he said.[...] even if high-skilled workers like project managers and Web developers find they are well compensated on the open market, said Lawrence Katz, a Harvard economist, low-skilled workers tend to fare worse outside firms.Bernstein concedes that the anxiety is legitimate, though he says services could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Business and Technology News
  • Take the Generic, Patients Are Told. Until They Are Not.
    By CHARLES ORNSTEIN and KATIE THOMAS - Sunday Aug 6, 2017

    Consumers have grown used to being told to give up their brand-name drugs in favor of cheaper generics. Now some are finding the opposite is true.

    Source: NYT > Home Page