american global english language institute, LLC

7014 13th avenue, suite 202
brooklyn, new york 11228

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 05, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4454933

County
NEW YORK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
UNITED STATES CORPORATION AGENTS, INC.
7014 13TH AVENUE, SUITE 202
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, 11228

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - AMERICAN GLOBAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE, LLC









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  • Around the Web

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    By SIMON ROMERO - Wednesday Aug 23, 2017

    Thanks to migration, adaptation, pop culture and commerce, the Spanish language endures in the United States, regardless of any effort to control it.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Roger Abrahams, folklorist who studied African American language, dies
    By William Grimes - Saturday Jul 1, 2017

    Roger Abrahams, folklorist who studied African American language, diesRoger Abrahams, one of the first folklorists to study the language and performance styles of black Americans as reflected in songs, proverbs and riddles both old and new, died June 20 in Sunnyvale.Mr. Abrahams (pronounced Abrams) cast his net wide, exploring Anglo-American folk songs, jump-rope rhymes and counting rhymes, but devoted most of his scholarly energies to the African diaspora in the Caribbean and the United States.Earlier folklorists had focused on black religious expression, the language of the church and pulpit.The Emergence of African American Culture in the Plantation South (1992), Mr. Abrahams turned back the clock to study the corn-shucking ceremony, a ritual with songs and chants that he reconstructed through newspaper accounts, travelers tales and diaries as a means of understanding the social dynamics of plantation society.Historian Wilson Moses, reviewing the book in the Historian, called Mr. Abrahams “probably the most celebrated living preservationist of African American secular oral traditions.”John Szwed, Mr. Abrahams’ collaborator on “Discovering Afro-America” (1975) and the essay collection Blues for New Orleans:After earning a master’s degree in literature and folklore from Columbia University in 1959, Mr. Abrahams returned to the University of Pennsylvania, where, under the direction of Leach, was awarded a doctorate in literature and folklore in 1961.To better understand the African roots of African American folk practices and verbal styles, Mr. Abrahams did extensive field research in the Caribbean, beginning with a week on St. Kitts and Nevis in 1962.With ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax, he recorded sea chanteys and the songs performed at tea meetings, a combination variety show and church fundraiser.Mr. Abrahams pursued his interest in black speech and street culture in the United States in several works that, like “Deep Down in the Jungle,” rejected the current argument that black Americans suffered not only from poverty but from a deficient culture.Mr. Abrahams taught for many years in the English department of the University of Texas in Austin, where he also served as the director of the African and Afro-American Research Institute.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Bay Area News
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    By MICHAEL WILSON - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    A Gowanus farmer’s writings from 1828 to 1830 describe burying them on property that includes the proposed site of a prekindergarten.

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  • Gary Sanchez’s catching woes have nothing to do with language
    By John Crudele - Sunday Oct 8, 2017

    Dear John: With all that is going on today, I know that this may seem trivelous [sic] of me, but wouldn’t you think that one of the most richest teams in all of baseball, the NY Yankees, would be able to afford a tutor to help Hispanic players speak just a few words of English?...

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  • Alt-Right, Alt-Left, Antifa: A Glossary of Extremist Language
    By LIAM STACK - Wednesday Aug 16, 2017

    Terms like these are part of a far-right political lexicon that has become important to understanding American politics.

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  • Rick Steves: Communicate even if you don’t know the lingo
    By Rick Steves - Friday Nov 4, 2016

    If I spoke other languages, I undoubtedly would enjoy a deeper understanding of the people and cultures I visit.[...] I manage just fine hurdling the language barrier when it comes to researching and writing guidebooks, leading tours, producing TV shows, and simply enjoying Europe.[...] English speakers can afford to be lazy, because English is the world’s linguistic common denominator.Most information that a traveler must understand — such as road signs, menus, telephone instructions, and safety warnings — is presented either in English or in universal symbols.[...] rest assured that any place trying to separate tourists from their money will always find a way to explain how to spend it.[...] while English may be Europe’s lingua franca, that doesn’t mean everyone you encounter will be fluent — and not everyone will understand American English.Europeans are more accustomed to Brits, who use words like “holiday” (not vacation), “torch” (not flashlight), and “petrol” (not gas).A one-word question (Photo?) is more effective than something more elegant (May I take your picture, sir?).If you’re hungry, clutch your stomach and growl.If the liquor was too strong, simulate an atomic explosion starting from your stomach and mushrooming to your head.The top 10 words in any language — mostly niceties like “please,” “thank you,” and “excuse me” — are more important than the next 200 words combined.Even a rudimentary awareness of the native language wins the respect of those you’ll meet.Vaulting over that pesky language barrier is always worth the leap.Rick Steves writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Rick Steves