american education for foreign students (aefs),inc

2307 w 12 street, 1 fl
brooklyn, new york 11223

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 15, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4374838

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - AMERICAN EDUCATION FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS (AEFS),INC









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  • Around the Web

  • A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry
    By KYLE SPENCER - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    Mastery-based learning allows students to learn at their own pace.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Family of Boy Who Wears Dresses Sues Education Department
    By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS - Tuesday Aug 29, 2017

    His family says a school in Park Slope was hostile to the boy, and that they were unfairly accused of abuse. The allegation was unfounded.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • 19th-Century Diary Suggests Slaves Are Buried in Brooklyn Lot
    By MICHAEL WILSON - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    A Gowanus farmer’s writings from 1828 to 1830 describe burying them on property that includes the proposed site of a prekindergarten.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • When study abroad ends in death, US parents find few answers
    By RISHABH R. JAIN, Associated Press - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    [...] while U.S. colleges and universities must report deaths on their campuses, they are not required to disclose most student deaths that occur abroad, and data collected by industry organizations are incomplete.More than 313,400 American students earned academic credit for studying abroad in 2014-15, according to the Institute of International Education, which creates study-abroad programs and manages U.S. government study-abroad scholarships.A group called the Forum on Education Abroad has attempted to gather such data for 2014 from two insurance companies, which together cover half of the U.S. study-abroad market.The group — with about 100 study-abroad companies and 570 schools as members — used the partial data from only one year to argue in a 2016 report that students are less likely to die overseas than on a U.S. campus, and "to understand more about the student experience, so that programs can be improved and risk can be mitigated," its chief, Brian Whalen, told The Associated Press.A preliminary analysis of that report was presented in June, and showed a mortality rate for college students studying abroad of 18.1 deaths per 100,000.Whalen said his group tried to get the exact number of student deaths overseas from the U.S. State Department, but it was not available.Within five years, she amassed seven binders of newspaper articles and travel alerts counting 3,200 other students who had died or been kidnapped, drugged, injured or assaulted abroad over the last few decades."Coffee beans and bowling balls have more rules than any program, school, professor or teacher escorting our kids into foreign countries," said Sheryl Hill, who has built a business called Depart Smart around providing safety advice to students going abroad, after her 16-year-old diabetic son, Tyler, fell ill and died while studying in Japan in 2007."Knowing which areas are hotspots for violent crime is important information for kids and parents to know when they're making decisions on where they'll study abroad," said Rep. Sean Maloney, a Democrat from New York, who first introduced the Ravi Thackurdeen Safe Students Study Abroad Act in Congress in 2014."If our kids are consistently getting hurt in a particular city or at a particular university, American families have a right to know that information so they can make informed choices about where to study," Maloney said.Last year, new federal legislation was introduced by Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, a Democrat, and Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker, a Republican, to make studying abroad an integral part of higher education by creating more university grants and incentives."Study abroad is a priority" at the University of Iowa, said Downing Thomas, the dean of international programs at the school, which sends more students to India than any other U.S. institution.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Why American Students Need Chinese Schools
    Friday Sep 8, 2017

    After putting her son in an elite state-run school in Shanghai, an American mother finds that the U.S. education system could learn a few things from China—most of all that teacher knows best.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: World News
  • Increasing Student Debt Transparency
    By Gayle Nelson - Tuesday Jul 11, 2017

    Forty-four million Americans hold $1.34 trillion in student debt, creating a huge negative encumbrance on economic growth. A new Oregon law hopes to educate students on their potential loan burden before it is too late.

    The post Increasing Student Debt Transparency appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly