all in one care international organization, inc.

15 carlton road
great neck, new york 11021

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 07, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4602742

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - ALL IN ONE CARE INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION, INC.









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  • Around the Web

  • The elusive millennials: are they worth chasing?
    Monday Dec 5, 2016

    Ah, millennials—they’re the constantly SnapChatting young people with attention spans that shorten every day. (I’m allowed to say this because I’m one of them!) As millennials make up more and more of the workforce and their buying power increases, organizations are obsessing about how to get them to care about their cause—and ultimately how to get them to give.

    This obsession has led to tons of research about the generation, and after doing a little digging, I noticed that the research doesn’t always match up. For instance, MobileCause said millennials give to causes, rather than specific organizations or brands, but Inc. 500 found millennials to be extremely brand loyal compared to other generations.

    So what’s the deal? Do millennials care about a specific organization or not? And how does that affect their likelihood to give? Big Duck’s new market research tool, the Brandraising Benchmark, also digs into questions like these, and our June survey returned some interesting results about young people:

    1. 18-34 year olds had some of the highest levels of awareness of participating organizations. This means they were more likely than other, older age groups to claim that they’d heard of a participating organization. This was true for nonprofits large and small, and across a variety of sectors.
    2. When asked about the importance of participating organizations’ mission statements, 18-34 year olds were more likely than any other age group to say the mission was very or extremely important. Again, true for nonprofits of all sizes and a variety of sectors.
    3. When asked about their likelihood to donate in the future, 18-34 year olds were more likely than all other age groups to say they probably or definitely would donate. Again, true for organizations large and small, and across sectors.

    So perhaps all the obsession over millennials is warranted: they’re aware of what’s going on in the nonprofit sector and excited about donating. What’s more, they seem to be aware of specific organizations (not just the issues behind them), so they may pay more attention to your brand than you might expect.

    My biggest takeaway about all of this is that developing a brand that inspires connection is more important than ever. Think Nike or Old Spice, and think fast because this age group has a lot of organizations vying for their attention.

    If you want to know what millennials (and other demographics) think of your organization specifically, sign up for our Brandraising Benchmark.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Police hunt for brute who snapped puppy’s neck over WiFi
    By Gabrielle Fonrouge - Thursday Jul 27, 2017

    Iowa police are searching for a creep they say snapped a Corgi puppy’s neck—all because he wasn’t allowed to use the WiFi. In what one officer called “the worst case of animal abuse he’s seen in years,” Christopher David Vogel, 25, arrived unannounced to his acquaintance Larry Gray’s apartment on July 6 and demanded to...

    Source: New York Post: News
  • Finding a good tree care service
    By Bay Area Consumers’ Checkbook - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    Finding a good tree care serviceThey absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas.[...] they look good.To keep your trees healthy or to get rid of dying ones, you may want the benefit of professional advice, skill and labor.To help you find it, nonprofit consumer group Bay Area Consumers’ Checkbook and Checkbook.org has surveyed its members and Consumer Reports subscribers about their experiences with area tree care services.For the next month, Checkbook is offering free access to its ratings of tree care services to Chronicle readers: www.checkbook.org/chronicle/tree-care.Other reasons for tree work include eliminating the risk to your house, or to electrical or other utility wires from rubbing limbs or precarious overhanging limbs; letting light and breezes more readily reach your house, garden or lawn; and protecting foundations and drainage systems from invading roots.[...] sometimes it’s difficult to diagnose and treat trees.Checkbook’s evaluation of tree care services found big company-to-company differences in the quality of advice and work performed.[...] the news is not all good.Some companies received favorable ratings from only 60 percent or fewer of their surveyed customers.Common customer complaints included charging more than promised, producing bad results and even property damage caused by careless or untrained workers.Typically, you don’t have to be home when bidders are looking at the job — but do include a thorough description of the work in a written contract that specifies who cleans up afterward, hauls away debris and wood, and removes the stump.Check whether a company’s liability insurance and worker’s compensation insurance are in effect.If you need expert advice and help caring for your trees, rather than simply removing goners, look for certification by the American Society of Consulting Arborists (www.asca-consultants.org) or the International Society of Arboriculture (www.isa-arbor.com).Bay Area Consumers’ Checkbook magazine and Checkbook.org is a nonprofit organization with a mission to help consumers get the best service and lowest prices.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Business and Technology News
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • DIY Fundraising: What Makes Your Organization Great?
    By Richard L. P. Solosky - Thursday Sep 28, 2017

    If there is one question that many nonprofits, especially smaller, younger and generally underfunded organizations forget to answer, it’s this simple question: What makes your organization great? It amazes me how many nonprofits skip right over a value proposition that explains why someone should give them any money...

    The post DIY Fundraising: What Makes Your Organization Great? appeared first on NonProfit PRO.

    Source: NonProfitPRO
  • ‘Game of Thrones': Clues About the Ironborn and House Greyjoy From Real Viking History (Guest Blog)
    By Carolyne Larrington, provided by
    - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    Ironborn military power is underpinned by their slender, beautifully designed warships which allow them to strike at will along the Westerosi coastline, and so it’s tempting to compare them with the Vikings, the medieval Scandinavian raiders who brought terror to Europe for three centuries.When he discovers that Theon’s splendid neck chain was bought rather than stolen, Balon tears it from his son’s neck, snarling, “That bauble around your neck, did you pay the iron-price for it, or the gold?” Balon clearly is not the kind of medieval Scandinavian king who would be celebrated by his court poets (skalds) for distributing treasure; no one would praise him as a “breaker of rings” or a “thrower of gold” or even a “hater … of the flame-red dragon square,” to cite just a few of Old Norse poetry’s terms for the generous king.The military successes of the Viking-age Scandinavians — settling northern England, founding Dublin and establishing the duchy of Normandy — were possible because their ships could travel far up the great rivers of Europe.The Great Army which swept across northern England in 865 A.D. took horses from those they defeated and thus were mobile enough to achieve military success inland, away from the rivers and coastlines where they easily could regroup on their ships.The Ironborn’s faith is very different from any version of Viking religion that we know of, but their belief in life after death closely resembles a watery version of Valhalla, the god Odin’s great hall, where the valkyries bring heroes who die in battle.When Yara and Theon sailed to Meereen to put their 50 ships at the disposal of Daenerys Targaryen for her long-anticipated invasion of Westeros, Daenerys agreed to support Yara’s claim to the Salt Chair, the Ironborn throne.The Vikings may have left their homelands because population pressure made it hard for them to sustain a living by agriculture on the thin soils and limited flatlands of the Norwegian or Icelandic fjords.For most of the Viking Age, Vikings were already successful traders, dealing in foodstuffs, timber, furs, falcons and slaves all across the North Atlantic, settling into lives as merchants and craftsmen in thriving towns such as Bergen and Trondheim.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish