aki renovations group, inc.

21 richards ave
monticello, new york 12701

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 28, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4520199

County
SULLIVAN

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - AKI RENOVATIONS GROUP, INC.









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