peace of mind urgent care, pLLC

9 brook place
valley stream, new york, 11580

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 14, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4621886

County
NEW YORK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - PEACE OF MIND URGENT CARE, PLLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Silicon Valley to Care About Fundamentals Again
    Monday Jun 11, 2012

    Following Facebook's listing debacle, investors seem to care about business fundamentals again. Rolfe Winkler discusses on Markets Hub. Photo: AFP/Getty Images.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Markets Hub
  • Living the Urban Life Upstate
    By KIM VELSEY - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    A New York couple who prefer to rent in the thick of things, even in a Hudson Valley town.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Netflix Changes Its Mind, Decides Maybe It Does Care About Net Neutrality Again
    By Chris Morran - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Netflix, once a loudmouthed supporter of net neutrality — the concept that your internet service provider should no say in what you do or where you go online — but Netflix CEO Reed Hastings recently shrugged off the need for neutrality as something that was important to the company a decade ago, but which it not longer really needs. …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • DeepMind Health inks another 5-year NHS app deal in face of ongoing controversy
    By Natasha Lomas - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

     DeepMind Health, the division of the Google-owned AI company that’s applying machine learning to medical data in the hopes of profiting from diagnostic gain, has inked another services agreement with the UK’s National Health Service — expanding the deployment of its alerts, messaging and task management app, Streams. Read More

    Source: TechCrunch
  • With Health Law in Flux, Insurers Scramble to Meet Filing Deadline
    By REED ABELSON - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Anthem, a major player in the Obamacare exchanges, announced that it would withdraw from Wisconsin and Indiana next year, along with Ohio.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Finding your nonprofit’s voice in the Trump era
    Tuesday Feb 7, 2017

    The last couple of weeks have been an emotionally draining and stressful time for so many of us who work in the nonprofit sector and are devoted to social justice and democratic values. Despite several alarming executive orders and appointees, it has been assuring to witness powerful and swift communications from nonprofit leaders of all types whose missions and values feel like they’re under attack (see Farra’s round-up of nonprofit leaders responding to the election). The fact is that the voices and actions of nonprofits are needed now more than ever, and it’s critical that organizations across all issues and areas seriously consider what role they can play in navigating through these uncertain political times.

    Some nonprofits whose missions are under threat but also have powerful advocacy programs and robust communications teams appear well equipped to respond to these crises and take the lead in mobilizing supporters to take action. Within moments of a new piece of breaking news from the White House, it seems like organizations like the ACLU and Planned Parenthood Federation of America have updated their websites with relevant content, urging their followers to take specific actions and donate.  

    Most nonprofits aren’t in the same position of power and capacity as the ACLU or Planned Parenthood to respond. Many nonprofits have missions that will be impacted more tangentially (or perhaps not at all) by national policies and politics. It can be hard to know how and what to communicate—what the next tweet should be, what statement to issue, how urgent to sound, what action to request. And it can be tempting—especially in such stressful and emotional times—to dial up all your communications, responding to every news announcement or headline. But such a reactive approach can spiral out of control fast, lead you to inflate your connection to a particular issue, and is just unsustainable for most communications teams running with limited staff and resources.

    Staying silent on current events that impact your communities may not be an option either. You might be perceived as out of touch, miss an opportunity to make a powerful statement about what you stand for, or leverage this moment for fundraising. What's the right communications approach for your nonprofit?

    Here are a few ideas to help your nonprofit make decisions now:

      • Brush up on your nonprofit’s guidelines for political activity: You probably already know if your nonprofit is a 501(c)(3) or a 501(c)(4), but now is a great time to remind yourself of the rules and guidelines associated with both, especially some of the limitations of a 501(c)(3) when it comes to politics. They’re a little murky, so read carefully, and consult with knowledgeable staff or lawyers to confirm. Here’s a resource to get the basics.
      • Get aligned on your stance: Figuring out how your organization responds to the political fire should be a shared decision. Hold a meeting among primary communicators, senior staff, and key board members to discuss your organization’s approach as well as roles and responsibilities.
      • Review your key organizational and communications goals: Keep your organization’s primary goals in mind (fundraising? systems change? education? recruitment?), determine how communications support them,and who you need to engage most to reach those goals. Have these priorities shifted as a result of this election? Was advocacy more of a secondary goal that’s now more primary? How do the results of this election influence your ability to reach these goals?
      • Consider your audience's point of view: Who are your audiences and what are their political views? Is your list made up of bleeding heart liberals? A mix of people from across the ideological spectrum? Craft your messages and actions with your audience's values and perspectives in mind.
      • Know how you can uniquely contribute: What can your nonprofit contribute to the conversation that’s different from other groups (e.g. putting a spotlight on real voices, issue expertise)? Prioritize issues that are most important for you to weigh in on. Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
      • Keep your brand in mind: It might be tempting to shift your organization’s tone and style now. But if you’re a social services organization and suddenly sound like a radical advocacy organization, it could be alarming and confusing to your audiences. Keep your tone in check and make sure you’re staying true to what your organization is all about. If your style is shifting, consider updating your brand’s voice alongside it. (We’ve got a brand check-up process that can help.

    How is your nonprofit navigating communications in the Trump era? We’d love to hear from you.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Will Netanyahu Seize the Chance for Peace?
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Stronger ties between Washington and Saudi Arabia mean opportunity for Israel.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Opinion
  • What are ‘happy apps’ and why should advertisers care?
    By Nikao Yang, AdColony - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Have you noticed that certain mobile apps make you happier than others? The feeling that you get after, say, streaming music on Pandora during a workout, using Waze to circumvent traffic, or using the Nest app to get your home to the perfect temperature before you arrive is different from how you feel after scrolling […]

    Source: VentureBeat