our community salutes of central new york, inc.

po box #5103
949 city hwy 20
edmeston, new york 13335

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 02, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4629605

County
OTSEGO

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - OUR COMMUNITY SALUTES OF CENTRAL NEW YORK, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The High Value of Your Nonprofit’s Values
    Wednesday Jan 25, 2017

    I was delighted to participate as a steering committee in the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s inaugural Spark Prize, an exciting new grantmaking initiative. I was truly impressed with how the Foundation integrated its values into every aspect of this project and leveraged them as a strategic decision-making tool in the grant review process, so I asked their fabulous DIrector of Communications, Liane Stegmaier, to write about it.  - Sarah Durham

    This month, Brooklyn Community Foundation marks the third anniversary of Brooklyn Insights—an extensive Brooklyn-wide community engagement project launched shortly after our President Cecilia Clarke joined the Foundation, which ultimately produced a bold grantmaking strategy that has since garnered national recognition.

    And coincidentally, on this anniversary we are announcing the recipients of our new Spark Prize—one of the Foundation’s highest-profile grantmaking efforts to date, awarding 5 outstanding Brooklyn nonprofits with no-strings-attached grants of $100,000 each in recognition of their service to Brooklyn, commitment to equity and justice, strong organizational values, and dynamic vision for the future.

    While we’re often asked about the major themes surfaced through our 1,000-plus Brooklyn Insights’ community conversations, the core grantmaking strategies we’ve since focused on, or our new institution-wide Racial Justice Lens—in this blog, we’re going to focus on the set of values that emerged during Brooklyn Insights that not only helped the Foundation determine our new direction, but continue to guide us and inform new initiatives like the Spark Prize.

    Of course, we knew three years ago that creating a community-led strategy might also lead us to change our mission statement and vision. But what we didn’t fully appreciate at the time was that while mission and vision are critical for moving us forward, strong institutional values are necessary to define who we are as an institution and how we hold ourselves accountable to these pursuits each and every day.

    Over the six months of listening to Brooklynites tell us about the challenges they faced in their communities, the opportunities they saw for change, and the roles we as their Community Foundation could play, we also heard loud and clear a call for us to be a different kind of institution: one that wears its values on its sleeve, keeps the doors open, and always positions community voices at the fore of its work.

    This call led us to articulate five new values for Brooklyn Community Foundation:

    • Courage. We believe in fearlessly identifying barriers to change and we fight for solutions that help overcome injustice.

    • Creativity. We believe that the power of imagination is greater than the challenges we face. We celebrate what works. We pursue the new. We learn as much from failure as we do from success.

    • Honesty. We are committed to being open and trustworthy in all we do and seek partners who share our values.

    • Collaboration. We believe in creating solutions together, harnessing the diversity of Brooklyn, and partnering with the community to spark change and produce results.

    • Respect. We believe in every resident’s dignity and basic human rights, and honor diversity of race, gender and background.

    We’ve come to refer to these values at every test in our decision-making, we talk about them in our Board meetings, staff meetings, and annual staff reviews, and they’ve informed our ongoing racial justice and equity trainings.

    And with the new Spark Prize, we are spotlighting the importance of strong values, and celebrating 5 Brooklyn nonprofits for their exemplary values-driven work. The first-ever recipients of the Spark Prize are Audre Lorde Project, Common Justice, Make the Road New York, MoCADA, and Neighbors Together.

    A committee of approximately 30 Brooklyn civic, business and philanthropic leaders (including Big Duck’s own Sarah Durham!) selected the 5 organizations from an applicant pool of over 150. They were chosen on the basis of a 1,000 word essay, followed by in person interviews where each spoke to the role their values play in their organization and how they align with the Foundation’s values.

    In their application, Audre Lorde Project stated that their values are rooted in transparency, wellness, transformation, cultural work and coalition building. “Collaboration with other social justice organizations is central to ALP’s intersectional, movement-building work.”

    Make the Road wrote that their values are why their 19,000+ members shape all of their campaigns: “Our youth challenge oppression by naming the disparate treatment of black and brown, LGBTQ and immigrant young people …. Their passionate advocacy has resulted in huge movement victories.”

    MoCADA isa museum founded on principles of justice, equity, and inclusion….courage, creativity and collaboration are the key elements of our mission, vision and values.”

    Neighbors Together’s work isgrounded in our belief in the dignity and potential of each person to be a vital part of creating a more just society” and its members have the courage “to fight for real and lasting solutions to overcome injustice.”

    And last but not least, Common Justice highlighted each of their values in their application—demonstrating a deep connection between their values and the unique nature of their healing work between victims and perpetrators of violence:

    • Accountability. We are responsible for our actions, our words, our power, and our impacts. We know that accountability affirms the dignity and humanity both of those responsible and of those harmed, and we hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold others. 

    • Transparency. We are transparent about our actions, our intentions, our options, and our decisions. We communicate with clarity and consistency with those impacted by what we do. 

    • Transformation. We believe in the potential of all human beings to transform, heal, grow, change, and be resilient. We believe we all deserve individuals, communities, and institutions that support us in being our best selves. 

    • Respect. We believe in the inherent worth, importance, rights, culture, and strengths of all people, and work to reflect and honor that in the way we behave toward others. 

    • Purpose. We uphold the responsibilities and boundaries of our work because we are ambitious, hopeful, and outcomes-driven. 

    These 5 values send a powerful message, and are a primary reason Common Justice is receiving the Spark Prize in our inaugural year.

    As nonprofit communicators, we are all very familiar with the adage “Show, Don’t Tell.”

    Mission tells us what you do; values show who you are.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Lessons from the Atlanta Community Food Bank on rolling out a new brand
    Thursday Oct 27, 2016

    After months of meetings and presentations, your new brand is board approved. Huzzah! Time to ‘go live’! But before you do... pause! Taking time to craft a smart rollout plan will be a critical part of your rebrand process. A new brand is more likely to resonate and thrive if it’s rolled out both internally (to staff and board) and externally (to volunteers, donors, partners) with attention and care.

    In 2016, Big Duck had the opportunity to work with Atlanta Community Food Bank, a powerhouse anti-hunger organization with a touch of southern charm, to reimagine their brand (read all about it here). First, we established their new brand strategy and identity, and then we developed a multichannel rollout plan to introduce it to their community.

    I interviewed Julie Bryant Fisher, Chief Marketing Officer, and Allison Young, Marketing Manager, about their experience rolling out their new brand and their recommendations for other nonprofits planning a rebrand. Here’s what they shared:

    Ally, Big Duck: What did rolling out your new brand successfully mean to your team?

    Julie, Atlanta Community Food Bank: Success meant marrying mission with a refreshed look that would send a “get noticed” signal to the community. Hunger is a critical issue, and urgency around ending hunger in our community is vital, achievable, and is something we do together. Success was also very much getting consensus from multiple audiences (board, stakeholders, staff) that we were making the right move with the right look.

    Allison, Atlanta Community Food Bank: Success also meant that we not only got love from our staff and constituents, but also from the “old guard.” We have a lot of people at the Food Bank who are 20+ year employees, not to mention constituents who have been with us since our founder was working out of the basement of a local church. The blue and the cornucopia have been long-standing icons of the Food Bank for so long that changing these things felt very nerve wracking. Getting their buy-in was so important.

    Ally, Big Duck: Specifically, how did you engage your staff in the brand rollout?

    Julie, Atlanta Community Food Bank: This turned out, for us, to be our biggest pivot point. Consider, though, that our staff was pretty change-fatigued coming into this rollout on the heels of a onboarding a new CEO and weathering a massive re-org and launch of a new 10-year strategic plan. It became critical to consider how to engage staff, knowing they could not collectively play a big role in the actual design of the new logo and tagline. Making it fun and engaging became a vital concept. It was the little things that counted—a fun “trunk show” to unveil new brand uniform options; fun swag giveaways at staff meetings where we were simultaneously covering all of the necessary communications around the rollout; an engaging, ceremonial staff exercise and lots of cupcakes and goodies to sweeten the goodbye for a brand that had been near and dear for a long time. Must also say that one of our best investments, besides Big Duck, was the creation of a fun, light-hearted, celebratory brand launch video to say farewell to the old look and introduce the new!

    Allison, Atlanta Community Food Bank: To echo Julie’s comments, we also went department by department to go through the steps we took to get to the new brand and to show them how it would be implemented across different areas that may have meant the most to them (trucks, letterhead, etc.). Because we were so change-fatigued, the fact that we were careful to go to every single department and show them the new look helped.

    Ally, Big Duck: What has your community’s response been so far to the new brand?

    Julie, Atlanta Community Food Bank: Overwhelmingly positive. From our partner agencies to our stakeholders, board members and volunteers—just about everybody has said “We love the new look!” and has been proudly wearing the abundant amount of swag items we handed out.

    Allison, Atlanta Community Food Bank:
    There’s been a lot of revitalization about the Food Bank and what we’re doing because people are noticing the change. Wherever we can put the new brand, we are!

    Ally, Big Duck: What advice would you give to another nonprofit rolling out its brand?

    Julie, Atlanta Community Food Bank: 
    That there are a lot of moving parts—a LOT. Coming up with the new look is just the starting point. Fully planning how to make sure the brand is effectively launched, accepted and that it gets teed up for a long, highly visible life, is where the real work begins. It is really critical to build a well-constructed plan to consider everything from letting key stakeholders under the curtain early (no surprises), to how to get staff to turn in their old uniforms and wear the new ones, to planning far enough in advance for the simultaneous creation and rollout of new marketing collateral, etc…

    Allison, Atlanta Community Food Bank: Have Big Duck on your side. But also, making sure you’re keeping in mind ALL of the moving parts—for us, we had people who wanted to order items prior to our fiscal year ending, and identifying ALL of the places our logo lives, which was much more than we had anticipated.

    Ally, Big Duck:  While it’s early, can you share any anecdotes about what impact your new brand has made?  

    Julie, Atlanta Community Food Bank: Hunger exists every day for a whole lot of people—people you may not realize are finding it hard to put meals on the table. Having a new brand sends a bold signal into the community that there is a problem we can solve together. LET’S GO!

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • 5 Ways Mom Consumer Communities Help Grow Your Bottom Line
    Friday Feb 17, 2017

    There was once a time when most of us were listening to music on cassette tapes, when brands interacted with consumers only in focus group facilities and information was gathered via phone surveys. Today, the options to engage with customers are boundless. Technology's rapid growth birthed a new wave of advancement. Everything from our dog's collar to our refrigerator is "smart" and while technology continues to advance, it begs the question, "Are brands any smarter in the way they are growing their bottom line?" The truth might hurt some.

    Source: Media Post: Engage:Moms
  • Ask the NY Giants: Socks with Sandals?
    Tuesday Sep 15, 2015

    Professional athletes like members of the New York Giants are the inspiration for the latest (counterintuitive) high-fashion trend: wearing socks with sandals. Photo: Stu Woo/The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • Apple Aiming to Make iPhone 'One-Stop Shop' for Medical Info
    By Juli Clover - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Apple wants the iPhone to serve as a comprehensive health repository for every iPhone user, keeping track of medical data like doctors visits, lab results, medications, and more, reports CNBC.

    Apple is said to have a "secretive team" within its health unit that has been communicating with developers, hospitals, and other industry groups about storing clinical data on the iPhone. With all of their medical data at their fingertips, iPhone users would have a better overall picture of their health, which could also be readily shared with doctors.


    Apple has been hiring developers familiar with protocols dictating the transfer of electronic health records and has talked with several health IT industry groups, including "The Argonaut Project," which promotes the adoption of open standards for health information, and "The Carin Alliance," a group aiming to give patients more control over their medical data. According to CNBC, Apple VP of software technology Bud Tribble has been working with the latter group.

    Apple is also rumored to be looking at startups in the cloud hosting space for acquisitions that would fit into its health plan.

    Essentially, Apple would be trying to recreate what it did with music -- replacing CDs and scattered MP3s with a centralized management system in iTunes and the iPod -- in the similarly fragmented and complicated landscape for health data.

    Such a move would represent a deviation in strategy from Apple's previous efforts in health care, the people said, which have focused on fitness and wellness.
    A centralized way to store all of a person's health data would allow the medical community to overcome existing barriers that prevent the transfer of patient information between medical providers. Hospitals and doctors offices often don't have a simple way to transfer patient information, and online medical portals are sometimes difficult to use with little info available to patients,

    Apple already allows iPhone users to record medical data and health information gathered by the Apple Watch and other connected devices in the built-in Health app, and it has delved into health research with CareKit and ResearchKit, but based on these rumors, the company's goal is to expand its health efforts far further in the future.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Two Protesters Disrupt ‘Julius Caesar’ in Central Park
    By MICHAEL PAULSON - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    A production of the Shakespeare play was interrupted by protesters objecting to a scene where a character resembling President Trump is murdered.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Protesters Outside ‘Julius Caesar’ in Central Park, and Laughs Inside
    By EMILY PALMER and MAYA SALAM - Sunday Jun 18, 2017

    Just a day after the “Shakespeare in the Park” play was interrupted by protesters who rushed on stage, a few demonstrators picketed, and the production was adjusted to address the episode.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Five Sites of New York’s L.G.B.T. History
    Monday Jun 19, 2017

    Jacob Riis Park, a Manhattan church, the Bum Bum Bar and more. In 360 degrees, visit five sites that helped shape New York City’s L.G.B.T. community and its history.

    Source: NYT > Home Page