otisco design, landscape architecture, d.p.c.

4905 bulrush road
syracuse, new york 13215

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JUNE 25, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4598142

County
ONONDAGA

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - OTISCO DESIGN, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, D.P.C.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The Reshaping of Austin's Architectural Landscape
    Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    Austin, Texas, is undergoing a transformation from laid-back college town to high-tech magnet. Urban planners are working to increase the stock of affordable homes amid explosive growth. Photo: Amy Mikler for The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Personal Finance
  • Architects of Social Responsibility: Views of Humanitarian Architecture in Practice
    By Jason Schneiderman - Tuesday Jun 6, 2017

    What is the role of architecture in civil society, and how has the field’s involvement in humanitarian work changed the profession?

    The post Architects of Social Responsibility: Views of Humanitarian Architecture in Practice appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • A Winning Design for a New York Monument to Gay and Transgender People
    By JOSHUA BARONE - Sunday Jun 25, 2017

    Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that the artist Anthony Goicolea had been selected to design the monument in Hudson River Park in Manhattan.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Smart web design for older donors is smart web design, period
    By Jeff Brooks - Wednesday May 31, 2017

    One of the most important things to keep in mind in fundraising is the age of donors. Which, for almost everyone, is older than you! The National Institute on Aging has a great tip sheet called Making Your Website Senior Friendly (PDF). It'll help you get digital right for older users: copy, design, and information architecture. Here are a couple of examples: Be direct. Instead of, Restaurants that offer senior discounts may be a good choice for older adults who like to eat out. say, If you like to eat out, go to restaurants that offer senior discounts. Use action...

    Source: Future Fundraising Now
  • What Is Color Blocking: Tips On Color Blocking With Plants
    By Darcy Larum - Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    Source: Gardening Know How
  • Six Steps to Achieve the Joys of Serverless Architectures
    By Matt Lancaster, Practice Lead, Accenture - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    The are solid benefits in a move to a serverless architecture, but remember these six important considerations to undertake before going serverless.

    Source: Information Week
  • 7 Technologies that Enable a Microservices Architecture
    By Cynthia Harvey Contributor, NetworkComputing - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Organizations that implement microservices often adopt the architectural style alongside complementary technologies, including the seven in this slideshow.

    Source: Information Week
  • Don’t make it harder to get the attention you deserve
    Thursday Nov 3, 2016

    Even organizations with a well-developed and up-to-date brand sometimes overlook one essential element of a strong communications strategy: brand architecture.

    Brand architecture is the name we give to the complicated network of roles and relationships between your organization’s programs, initiatives, events, publications, spaces—all the things that you do, own, and are known for. You might refer to them as “brands” or “sub-brands.” Perhaps you don’t think of them as distinct entities with identities of their own. But your audiences often do.

    Most nonprofits have grown their brand architecture  in an ad hoc way—a clever event name here, an interesting icon there, a legacy group maintained from a merger. It may all seem like small stuff, but eventually it adds up to a big problem: a brand that lacks a coherent, purposeful narrative and fails to make a powerful and focused impression.

    Evidence of brand architecture problems pops up in the conversations you have with your team every day.

    “Should we put our logo on our Walk t-shirts?”

    When you have clear and purposefully maintained brand architecture, questions like this won’t be up for debate. If your event is closely branded with the overall organization, the logo will be thoughtfully incorporated into the visual standards you’ve established. If the event has a completely separate brand designed to reach a completely separate audience, the main organization logo won’t be appropriate—and everyone will be clear about that ahead of time.

    Either way, clear brand architecture saves you time, spares you headaches, AND ensures that the choices you’re making on the ground reflect a smart strategy. Win-win-win.

    “We need a separate website for this program.”

    Setting up lots of unique websites is usually a sign that your team has a tendency to think and communicate in siloes. When you maintain separate sites for each program or event, you give each one a distinct identity—and discourage people from seeing your work as many parts making up a coherent whole. You’ll have to work even harder to help them see the other great work you do and feel inspired support your organization overall.

    [Side note: this issue could also be a sign that it’s time to redo your website.]

    “Our gala is coming up in a few months: time to start thinking about a logo.”

    Sound the alarm! If your team is in the habit of making logos and coming up with names for lots of events or programs or initiatives, odds are good that you’re creating unnecessary confusion and weakening your overall brand impression.

    That’s not to say that you can’t have special treatments for certain programs or a distinct look and feel for your big event—but it’s important to be strategic about it. Well-developed brand architecture strategy usually includes clear criteria for when it’s appropriate to stretch your brand and how far (e.g., a customized name or theme might be okay—but not a separate logo).

    When you allow key programs to take on lives (and messages and audiences) of their own without thoughtfully connecting them to your organization’s overall brand, you’re missing an opportunity—and you’re making it all too easy to stay lost in the shuffle of great causes. Strategic brands with clear hierarchy, a consistent look, and a unified message have a leg up in a messy and inconsistent world.

    Any of these challenges sound familiar? If so, it might be time to step back and consider whether you have a problem with your brand architecture (it happens to the best of us—check out this helpful piece by fellow Duck Ally Dommu on some of the causes of brand architecture issues).

    On November 11, Sarah Durham, Big Duck's CEO, and Debi Goldberg, The Union for Reform Judaism's Director of Communications, will be speaking about brand architecture and sharing an in depth case study with tips. Details are online here, or just let us know if you can't make it and we'll share the resources.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits