north america wellness corp

11145 76th dr apt b6
forest hills, new york 11375

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 09, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4470813

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - NORTH AMERICA WELLNESS CORP









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Listing of the Day: Toronto Forest Hill
    Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The sprawling steel-frame and concrete mansion sits in Toronto's most prestigious and affluent neighborhoods.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • Exploring peaceful peaks and rugged beauty of Gangwon
    By Spud Hilton - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    When the tethered log finally strikes the massive bronze bell, it’s as if all other noises on Odaesan Mountain take a breath. Slowly, as the achingly pure tone fades, other sounds return, including the gentle clamor of branches and leaves slapping together in the wind. The sprawling, throbbing metropolis of Seoul — and its symphony of industry, traffic, construction, markets and K-Pop music — dominate perception. The Taebaek Mountains are the thorny, forest-covered spine that runs up the east side of the Korean Peninsula, including well into North Korea. Despite averaging about 3,000 feet (topping out in Gangwon at 5,600 feet) the Taebaek Mountains are home to many of the country’s ski resorts and winter sports parks — which will play a starring role in February when the 2018 Winter Olympics are in Pyeongchang, just down the road from Odaesan National Park. The rest of the year, however, Gangwon is a mix of laid-back mountain and coastal towns — a refuge for urban dwellers seeking a slower pace, and a sightseeing spot for tourists (mostly Korean) planning to wander among the natural wonders. The province, which is about the same land area as New Jersey, has its share of man-made oddities — including a strangely comprehensive museum in Gangneung dedicated to Thomas Edison and the Gramophone — but I’m here to see the original scenery and explore what used to be considered skyscrapers before there was steel and glass. The first night at Woljeongsa Temple, I watched the rain for an hour, surprised at how quickly I didn’t miss TV, Instagram or email when facing a mountain forest outside the wood-frame paper doors. Woljeongsa offers a temple-stay program; visitors seeking insight, serenity or just affordable, zero-frills accommodations are allowed to bed down for the night in guest housing. Except there isn’t really a bed so much as a comfy pad, a thick blanket and a heated cement floor. The program offers varying levels of participation in prayers, rituals and duties, but I chose the option that offered time and freedom to explore Odaesan park and the other temples that seem as much a part of nature as the rocks and trees. Meals are included, which gave me a chance to get familiar with a more natural vegetarian fare, mostly vegetables, soup, rice, various forms of tofu and, of course, kimchi. There are subtle reminders that this is a working temple, not just a static shrine — among them the dining hall, a brightly lit cafeteria with kitchen and a cleaning station where diners, including temple-stay guests, do their own dishes. The trail to Jeongmyeolbogung is a dauntingly steep switchback path that climbs through the forest — and is lined the entire way with the volleyball-size, brightly colored Buddha lanterns that fill temple courtyards and line many of the park’s hiking trails. While I passed Sajaam Temple, a multistory structure with tiered roofs that followed the profile of the hillside, it began to sink in how much the Buddhism and the land are intertwined in this national park. Closer to the top, the forest thinned and the horizon — rows of rolling peaks and hills — popped into view, carpeted in 20 shades of green. The woman at the information hut offered the requisite paper cup with hot tea that smelled of fig, and some sweet bean-curd pieces that they give to all visitors who reach the mountaintop Jeongmyeolbogung, a shrine of Woljeongsa Temple that shelters a relic of the the Buddha himself, one of the few in Korea. [...] she checked to see if anyone was watching and quickly dug out the junk food — two packages of chocolate-coated “creme cookies.” On first approach to Seoraksan National Park, the sheer volume of tourists arriving on buses was worrisome. During a detour to Pyeongchang, the county hosting the 2018 Winter Olympics, I had found the “natural beauty” heavily developed at the two sprawling ski resorts of Alpensia and Yongpyong, where most of the events will be. While I was glad that TV viewers would see a side to South Korea other than urban Seoul, I also was glad I hadn’t planned to spend time there. [...] after I entered the park and as the broad valley opened up, some of the greatest hits of the Taebaek Mountains came into view, and the crowds dissipated. After what seemed like more stairs than in a Seoul skyscraper, I walked out on a ledge to see the rest of Ulsan Bawi, an oversized jagged wall, seemingly built to defend against invading armies or monsters. Crews are working to complete the high-speed rail line from Seoul to Pyeongchang in time for the 2018 Winter Olympics, which will make Gangwon more accessible. If driving, most car rentals (especially to Western tourists, apparently) come with a GPS unit. United Airlines and Korean Air fly regular nonstops from San Francisco to Seoul, starting around $800 round-trip.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Quebec a Canadian haven for quirky hotels
    By Margo Pfeiff - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    The handful of remaining elderly nuns then donated the building to a nonprofit organization that, after renovations, opened it in 2015 as a luxury 65-room hotel, retreat and wellness center. Once home to over 200 nuns, the elegant and unusual hotel is a blend of old and new, the no-frills monastery style converting well into a chic minimalist design with whitewashed walls, exposed wooden beams and floors, and wide hallways lined with portraits and statues leading to quiet retreats for meditation. The secular hotel’s mission is to carry on the Augustine philosophies of rejuvenating and healing its guests, now through meditation, aromatherapy, massage, yoga, holistic workshops and healthy food. For a true historical experience, I stay in one of Le Monastere’s 33 “authentic” rooms, simple former nuns’ quarters with Augustinian furniture and a single bed. An organic breakfast is served in the bright dining room in silence, according to monastery tradition, and I feel myself starting to unwind. Stepping down worn and creaky steps, I explore the hospital and Augustine museum with over 40,000 artifacts on the main floor, then head downstairs again into the massive new archives with more than half a mile of original manuscripts. The modern hotel celebrates indigenous connections, from rooms artfully decorated with fox and beaver pelts to the subtle flavors of wild herbs from the boreal forest on the lunch and dinner plates of their restaurant. Guests can join the daily Labrador tea ceremony in the lobby, learn how to make bannock, go dog sledding, strap on snowshoes to track caribou or sleep in the longhouse with a modern hotel room as a backup for convenience. In La Traite restaurant, renowned Quebec chef Martin Gagné offers multicourse tasting menus to highlight his creative takes on traditional native cuisine. The food is seasonal and might feature elk tartare, smoked eel, Quebec scallops with sea urchin butter, wild cattails with spicy birch syrup, red deer osso buco perfumed with bog myrtle or a fillet of seal. Quebec’s provincial park service — SEPAQ — has always dreamed up inspired ways to help people enjoy the wilderness with various levels of comfort in their 23 parks and nine wildlife reserves. The 320-square-foot studio layout of blond wood has a sleek Scandinavian feel and includes a well-equipped kitchen and compact bathroom with shower. There is electricity, hot water, wallboard heating, bean bag chairs for lounging in front of a small wood-burning stove, and a welcoming hammock swinging inside a screened porch. The cabins are available year round, and before I leave I’m already planning an EXP cross-country ski and snowshoe excursion when the snowflakes start falling. Just 30 minutes north of the city, North America’s only Ice Hotel since 2001 has 44 rooms and suites, each themed with different super-clear ice sculptures. The dazzling grand lobby and its chandelier, the chapel where you can tie the knot with the bride wearing a white fur coat, the three bars — and even the glass from which I sip local ice cider — are all made of ice. There’s also a modern hotel where every Ice Hotel guest has a backup room for modern conveniences. After a warm-up sauna and hot tub I head to my ice bed in a spectacular room with icebergs, polar bears and seals swimming along icy blue walls that can be up to four feet thick. Though the inside temperature is 41 F, the wooden frame and thermal mattress atop my ice bed and a weapons-grade down sleeping bag keep me warm throughout the night, dreaming about living atop an ice floe. Longhouse overnight package from $560 per night for a minimum of four people includes the cultural experience, a hotel room for modern conveniences and breakfast. Various packages and promotions might include activities from dog sledding to access to the adjacent Valcartier theme park complex including an indoor water park. www.valcartier.com/en/winter-playground Sleep in a suspended spheres or a glass geodesic dome in forest alongside Saguenay Fjord, 2 hours and 45 minutes northeast of Quebec City. Mont Tremblant Treehouses: 5000, ch. du Lac-Caribou, Saint-Faustin-Lac-Carré, Québec, 1-819 681-4994; www.refugesperches.com/en/our-treehouses Selection of tree houses in the Laurentian Mountains 1 hour 45 minutes north of Montreal. Three, four and six-course tasting menus often featuring unconventional First Nations’ ingredients prepared in an elegant fine dining restaurant by renowned Quebec chef, Martin Gagné.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Marine Corps Plane Crash: The Victims
    By THE NEW YORK TIMES - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Family members and friends have begun identifying many of the 16 American service members who died on Monday when their plane crashed in rural Mississippi.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Final 2017 Top 25 College Baseball Rankings
    By Teddy Cahill - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    National champion Florida finishes the season at No. 1.

    The post Final 2017 Top 25 College Baseball Rankings appeared first on BaseballAmerica.com.

    Source: Baseball America
north america wellness corp forest hills ny