north america wellness corp

11145 76th dr apt b6
forest hills, new york 11375

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 09, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4470813

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - NORTH AMERICA WELLNESS CORP









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Listing of the Day: Toronto Forest Hill
    Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The sprawling steel-frame and concrete mansion sits in Toronto's most prestigious and affluent neighborhoods.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • Yosemite’s south entrance closed because of wildfire
    By Kurtis Alexander - Wednesday Aug 30, 2017

    Yosemite National Park’s southern entrance was shut down Wednesday because of a fast-moving wildfire that burned seven structures and prompted authorities to close Highway 41 just outside the park. The Railroad Fire, which ignited Tuesday afternoon north of Oakhurst, had charred 1,200 acres of foothills in and around the Sierra National Forest as of Wednesday evening, according to the U.S. Forest Service. High temperatures and strong winds were expected to fuel further growth, officials said. The cause of the fire was under investigation. Mandatory evacuations were in place for the small community of Sugar Pine, close to the fire’s origin, as well as nearby Sugar Pine Camp and Fish Camp.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Bay Area News
  • Exploring peaceful peaks and rugged beauty of Gangwon
    By Spud Hilton - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    When the tethered log finally strikes the massive bronze bell, it’s as if all other noises on Odaesan Mountain take a breath. Slowly, as the achingly pure tone fades, other sounds return, including the gentle clamor of branches and leaves slapping together in the wind. The sprawling, throbbing metropolis of Seoul — and its symphony of industry, traffic, construction, markets and K-Pop music — dominate perception. The Taebaek Mountains are the thorny, forest-covered spine that runs up the east side of the Korean Peninsula, including well into North Korea. Despite averaging about 3,000 feet (topping out in Gangwon at 5,600 feet) the Taebaek Mountains are home to many of the country’s ski resorts and winter sports parks — which will play a starring role in February when the 2018 Winter Olympics are in Pyeongchang, just down the road from Odaesan National Park. The rest of the year, however, Gangwon is a mix of laid-back mountain and coastal towns — a refuge for urban dwellers seeking a slower pace, and a sightseeing spot for tourists (mostly Korean) planning to wander among the natural wonders. The province, which is about the same land area as New Jersey, has its share of man-made oddities — including a strangely comprehensive museum in Gangneung dedicated to Thomas Edison and the Gramophone — but I’m here to see the original scenery and explore what used to be considered skyscrapers before there was steel and glass. The first night at Woljeongsa Temple, I watched the rain for an hour, surprised at how quickly I didn’t miss TV, Instagram or email when facing a mountain forest outside the wood-frame paper doors. Woljeongsa offers a temple-stay program; visitors seeking insight, serenity or just affordable, zero-frills accommodations are allowed to bed down for the night in guest housing. Except there isn’t really a bed so much as a comfy pad, a thick blanket and a heated cement floor. The program offers varying levels of participation in prayers, rituals and duties, but I chose the option that offered time and freedom to explore Odaesan park and the other temples that seem as much a part of nature as the rocks and trees. Meals are included, which gave me a chance to get familiar with a more natural vegetarian fare, mostly vegetables, soup, rice, various forms of tofu and, of course, kimchi. There are subtle reminders that this is a working temple, not just a static shrine — among them the dining hall, a brightly lit cafeteria with kitchen and a cleaning station where diners, including temple-stay guests, do their own dishes. The trail to Jeongmyeolbogung is a dauntingly steep switchback path that climbs through the forest — and is lined the entire way with the volleyball-size, brightly colored Buddha lanterns that fill temple courtyards and line many of the park’s hiking trails. While I passed Sajaam Temple, a multistory structure with tiered roofs that followed the profile of the hillside, it began to sink in how much the Buddhism and the land are intertwined in this national park. Closer to the top, the forest thinned and the horizon — rows of rolling peaks and hills — popped into view, carpeted in 20 shades of green. The woman at the information hut offered the requisite paper cup with hot tea that smelled of fig, and some sweet bean-curd pieces that they give to all visitors who reach the mountaintop Jeongmyeolbogung, a shrine of Woljeongsa Temple that shelters a relic of the the Buddha himself, one of the few in Korea. [...] she checked to see if anyone was watching and quickly dug out the junk food — two packages of chocolate-coated “creme cookies.” On first approach to Seoraksan National Park, the sheer volume of tourists arriving on buses was worrisome. During a detour to Pyeongchang, the county hosting the 2018 Winter Olympics, I had found the “natural beauty” heavily developed at the two sprawling ski resorts of Alpensia and Yongpyong, where most of the events will be. While I was glad that TV viewers would see a side to South Korea other than urban Seoul, I also was glad I hadn’t planned to spend time there. [...] after I entered the park and as the broad valley opened up, some of the greatest hits of the Taebaek Mountains came into view, and the crowds dissipated. After what seemed like more stairs than in a Seoul skyscraper, I walked out on a ledge to see the rest of Ulsan Bawi, an oversized jagged wall, seemingly built to defend against invading armies or monsters. Crews are working to complete the high-speed rail line from Seoul to Pyeongchang in time for the 2018 Winter Olympics, which will make Gangwon more accessible. If driving, most car rentals (especially to Western tourists, apparently) come with a GPS unit. United Airlines and Korean Air fly regular nonstops from San Francisco to Seoul, starting around $800 round-trip.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Marine Corps Plane Crash: The Victims
    By THE NEW YORK TIMES - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Family members and friends have begun identifying many of the 16 American service members who died on Monday when their plane crashed in rural Mississippi.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Trump not ruling out military retaliation against North Korea
    By Bruce Golding - Sunday Sep 3, 2017

    President Trump refused Sunday to rule out military retaliation against North Korea over its latest — and most potent — nuclear test, saying only, “We’ll see,” when asked if the US would strike the rogue nation. Hours later, the White House raised the specter of America’s own atomic arsenal, saying Trump had spoken with Japanese...

    Source: New York Post: News
  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
north america wellness corp forest hills ny