nft good memories, LLC

1 sadore lane
4t
yonkers, new york 10710

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 05, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4572432

County
WESTCHESTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - NFT GOOD MEMORIES, LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

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    Source: NYT > Home Page
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    Source: Media Post: MAD SF
  • How to reset your Mac's NVRAM, PRAM, and SMC
    By Joe Kissell - By Joe Kissell - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    When your Mac starts acting up, you’ll probably run through some common troubleshooting procedures, such as restarting it, running Disk Utility, and perhaps performing a Safe Boot. Your repair repertoire should also include a couple of additional procedures that can occasionally eliminate otherwise inscrutable problems—zapping the NVRAM and resetting the SMC.

    Zap the NVRAM (or PRAM)

    Back in the day, the standard list of quick fixes for random Mac ailments always included “zap the PRAM.” The P in PRAM stood for parameter (the RAM was just RAM—random access memory), and it referred to a small amount of special, battery-backed memory in every Mac that stored information the computer needed before it loaded the operating system. If the values in this memory got out of whack for one reason or another, your Mac might not start up correctly, or might exhibit any of numerous odd behaviors afterward. So you could press a key sequence at startup to reset (or “zap”) the PRAM, returning it to default, factory values.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Source: Macworld
  • Understanding The Fickle Adult Beverage Consumer
    Monday May 8, 2017

    Many of us will head to the grocery store for Memorial Day to pick up a few items and, inevitably, that includes grabbing beer, wine or a spirit product. We have our list in hand and a pretty goodidea of what we're going to buy. But something happens to 21% of us while in the store: We change our mind.

    Source: Media Post: Engage:Boomers
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    By JENNIFER SENIOR - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Gerda Saunders tries to analyze her dementia as dispassionately as possible in her new book.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Memorial Day
    By Tom Belford - Monday May 29, 2017

    Roger and I are taking the day off; it’s the end of  Memorial Day weekend in the States.   Since my coming of age in the Sixties, the US has fought wars and engaged in military actions some of which I actively opposed, but nothing should detract from paying honor to those who have given their lives in […]

    Source: The Agitator
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    Photons store themselves in ions that bob up and down in a sea of light.

    Source: Ars Technica