national association of distinguished professionals, inc.

15 north mill street
nyack, new york 10960

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 17, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4404907

County
ROCKLAND

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
CORPORATE CREATIONS NETWORK INC.
15 NORTH MILL STREET
NYACK, NEW YORK, 10960

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DISTINGUISHED PROFESSIONALS, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Listing of the Day: Nyack, New York
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Between the pool, the expansive views of the Hudson, and the home's private beach, everything is built around being near the water.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • What is the Most Important Thing a Donor Can Give You? … It’s Not What You Think It is.
    By Michael J. Rosen - Friday Feb 10, 2017

    What is the most important thing a donor can give you? If I were to ask that question at an Association of Fundraising Professionals conference, I suspect most members of the audience would respond by saying, “A big check!” If I were to pose the same question at a National Association of Charitable Gift Planners […]

    Source: Michael Rosen Says...
  • Ask the NY Giants: Socks with Sandals?
    Tuesday Sep 15, 2015

    Professional athletes like members of the New York Giants are the inspiration for the latest (counterintuitive) high-fashion trend: wearing socks with sandals. Photo: Stu Woo/The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • The Power of Brand Personality for Your Nonprofit
    Tuesday Feb 28, 2017

    We all have distinct personalities—some of us are outgoing and whimsical, while others are nerdy and creative. Your nonprofit is no different. We believe that defining and using your organization’s brand personality can be a useful communications tool. In fact, your personality, when coupled with your positioning (the big idea you hope others might associate with your organization), is the heart of your brand strategy and the key to defining or refining your brand identity and experience.

    First things first, what is brand personality? Brand personality is the tone and style you use to guide your communications. It is a set of adjectives that describe the overarching feelings you want your community to associate with your organization. Think about the most recent Target commercial you’ve seen and how it made you feel. You might describe the retail brand as fun, lovable, pleasant, and charming, and that’s brand personality in action.

    Elements of your personality should come through in the tone and style of all of your communications. Writing a blog post? Designing a brochure? Check out the adjectives that make up your brand personality and decide if the communications look, feel, and sound true to your personality.

    An effective brand personality will help your nonprofit distinguish itself from its peers because it’s a list of characteristics that are only true to you. Used consistently, personality will become a core part of your brand, and audiences will immediately associate certain feelings with your work.

    Not sure where to start? Imagine you were asking a board members to set your organization up on a blind date with their close friend, a generous potential donor. How would you want that board member to describe you to their friend? Sure, you hope they’d reference your mission or elevator pitch, but what adjectives would you want them to use to get that donor excited to meet you? Everyone would like a nice, professional, and credible organization, but what’s so special about you that someone couldn’t wait to meet you for dinner (or go to your next gala)?

    I want to help you discover and apply your brand personality to your nonprofit. Join me on March 21 at this free 90-minute workshop, Fish or fowl? Establishing your nonprofit's brand personality, at The Foundation Center in Washington, DC. We’ll talk about brand personality, look at some examples, and walk through exercises to help you determine the characteristics that describe your nonprofit on its best day.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Four ways a strong brand can drive corporate giving
    Thursday Feb 23, 2017

    A strong brand provides countless benefits for nonprofit fundraising programs. It helps organizations stand out from their peers, focuses fundraisers and other communicators on the messages they need to drive action, and provides the vision for a better future that inspires supporters to give.

    A strong brand can also give you the edge you need to attract corporate donors. With $24.5 billion donated by corporations last year, that’s no small consideration. Here are four ways that your brand can help support your corporate giving program:

    1. Trust
    A clearly defined brand will help your organization generate stronger, more trusting relationships with your supporters, a key ingredient in building engaged communities. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs want to do good, but they also want to promote their own brand and connect with consumers. If your audience is highly engaged, corporate donors can feel confident that their support will get noticed. Because people like to support companies that do good, a recognized connection with your organization can help them build trust and find new, loyal customers within your community.

    2. Reliability
    Corporate donors want to support good causes, but they also know that the nonprofit they choose to associate their brand with reflects back onto them. So, it is equally true that the values associated with a nonprofit brand will reflect on your corporate donors, and if your brand isn’t sufficiently professional or reliably expressed, you are starting at a disadvantage.

    3. Clarity
    CSR programs operate based on defined philanthropic priorities, which are typically selected based on the causes’ affinities with the company’s business interests. For example, Disney’s corporate citizenship program focuses on causes benefiting children. Other companies, like Google, that focus on organizations using technology to combat a range of issues, can get fairly niche. Having a clear mission statement—which is a core piece of your brand identity—as well as key messages articulated in concise language will help you appeal to a CSR team.

    4. Personality
    Well-defined brands, whether nonprofit or corporate, express a clear personality that helps them to distinguish themselves. Corporations prefer to support organizations that align with their brand’s personality, so having a distinct personality that aligns with a corporate brand can make your nonprofit more attractive.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Paving the Way: Nonprofit Professional of the Year
    By Nhu Te - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    Back in 2004, Michele Boston was at the height of her career. She was a CEO for Boston Health Care System, was previously was a director for Children Services in Illinois and was an associate professor at William Mitchell College of Law, where she taught mental health law...

    The post Paving the Way: Nonprofit Professional of the Year appeared first on NonProfit PRO.

    Source: Tactical Leadership Strategy for the Modern NonProfit
  • Stonewall Inn Project to Preserve Stories Behind a Gay Rights Monument
    By SARAH MASLIN NIR - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    A $1 million grant will go toward conserving the oral histories of those who lived through the 1969 riots.

    Source: NYT > Home Page