my time fitness in-home personal training LLC

33-31 167th street
flushing, new york 11358

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
NOVEMBER 25, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4492042

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
MARYELLEN TOCKAWSHEWSKY
33-31 167TH STREET
FLUSHING, NEW YORK, 11358

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - MY TIME FITNESS IN-HOME PERSONAL TRAINING LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • A Former Navy SEAL On The Hidden Influencers In Every Team
    By Chris Fussell - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    To spot who they are, have every new hire follow this rule for 90 days.

    In 2010, I was an executive officer in the Navy, splitting my time between U.S. headquarters and being deployed to an international location. This arrangement proved tricky as my responsibilities at headquarters grew, so I was authorized to hire a civilian to handle budget management, equipment maintenance, travel, and training coordination, among other functions.

    Read Full Story

    Source: Fast Company
  • 3 Key Takeaways From Sustainable Brands Conference
    Monday Jun 13, 2016

    By the time I saw the Metrolink train billboard, it was too late. I was already cheerfully guzzling natural resources and spitting out emissions along the 5 Freeway from L.A. to San Diego. I gaspedand shook my head at my stupidity and selfishness for driving to Sustainable Brands, which took place June 6 - 9. Conference check-in officials seemed to sense my crime and asked, "Did you take thetrain or are you a hypocritical fraud who drove? And are you sharing a hotel room or wasting resources in a room by yourself?"

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Green
  • Using your brand strategy everyday in everything
    Wednesday May 17, 2017

    If you’ve ever researched branding you’ve probably heard jargony terms like “brand proposition”, “brand promise”, ‘positioning”, “personality”, “voice”, or “unique selling proposition (USP)” tossed around. Any rigorous rebranding process typically starts by establishing a clear strategy, using at least one, if not many, of these approaches. There are a lot of approaches for developing brand strategy, any one of which can help your team get clear on what you’re trying to communicate.

    A well-developed brand strategy should help everyone see how your strategic plan or mission comes to life in day-to-day communications, both inside your organization and outside of it. But too often, nonprofits and businesses view their brand strategy as something that’s only useful when creating a new logo or tagline-- not as something that can help transform how everyone in your organization communicates every day. When folks criticize branding as “navel-gazing”, decorative, or extraneous, it’s usually because the team behind it has developed it in a vacuum. A solid nonprofit brand must originate from and be deeply tied to its vision, mission, and values, and bring them to life in dynamic ways that inspire the hearts and minds of people inside and outside of the organization.

    BIg Duck’s model for building strong nonprofit brands, which we call “brandraising”, uses two simple brand strategy concepts: Positioning and Personality. Both can help anyone on your staff– from your staff leadership and board to to your programs team and beyond– write, speak, and behave in ways that bring your mission to life and create a truly on-brand experience of your organization, head-to-toe.

    Positioning

    Positioning is the primary idea you want people to associate with your organization, and it’s a North Star everyone on your team can use to guide their actions daily. It’s closely related to your mission, but more focused on and oriented toward how you want to be perceived, not what you do.

    For example, Auburn’s mission is, “Auburn equips leaders with the organizational skills and spiritual resilience required to create lasting, positive impact in local communities, on the national stage, and around the world. We amplify voices and visions of faith and moral courage. We convene diverse leaders and cross-sector organizations for generative collaboration and multifaith understanding. And we research what’s working — and not — in theological education and social change-making.

    Walk into their office or meet with their team and you’ll see that mission is used rigorously to inform their work. But that language isn’t easy for staff to remember and use with every interaction. Their positioning—“Auburn is the premier leadership development center for the multifaith movement for justice.

    Publicly, Auburn shares and promotes its mission. Internally, its positioning statement gives staff a tool to express their big idea so they can be sure that everything they do supports and advances it.

    Positioning is often reductive: a simplification of what you actually do. It’s hard to get it right, but when you do, it’s a useful pocket-tool you can grab handily on the fly.

    When developing your organization’s positioning statement, make sure yours is simple, clear, and usefully distinguishing from others in your space. Remember, it’s not always something you state publicly, so you can get away with things like “the leading organization...”, for instance, which could be problematic in public-facing language.

    Got your positioning pinned down? Here’s a few ways it can be used inside your organization for maximum value.

    • Integrate an overview of your mission and positioning into your onboarding trainings for new staff and board members. Make sure everyone is clear what they are and how to use them. Consider developing a set of role plays that give them a chance to practice. 
    • Use positioning to guide how you write and speak. For example, give the positioning to the board member who’s going to speak at your upcoming event and frame it as the ‘cheat sheet’ for what they need to communicate about your organization.
    • Use positioning to help determine if new materials your vendors develop are on strategy. Does that new brochure or website, at a glance, support your positioning?

    Personality

    Personality is the tone and style your organization uses to communicate. It’s relatively easy to develop and can have a transformative effect; suddenly, everyone’s writing, speaking, and representing your organization consistently. (Read Farra’s article The Power of Brand Personality at your Nonprofit for more.)

    If positioning is a more perception, or communication-oriented way to think about your mission, than personality is a more perception or communication-oriented way to live and express your organization’s values for many (but not all) organizations.

    If you’ve ever taken a class at Soul Cycle you know their staff are dynamic examples of living the brand. No matter which location you visit, Soul Cycle staffers are unrelentingly friendly, helpful, and upbeat, no matter their role or level of seniority. Sure, they have bad days, but they are clearly trained to turn on the charm whenever a customer walks in. Wouldn’t it be nice if your staff were perceived that way by your donors, clients, and board members too? They can be-- but first you need to hire and train them to do so– otherwise, they’ll continue to do what most people do naturally, just be themselves, for better and for worse.

    Auburn’s personality is Loving, Entrepreneurial, Courageous, Multifaith, Progressive, and Respected. This list of guiding attributes is distinguishing and practically useful for writing, speaking, and other external communications.

    Some of my favorite organizational personalities have had words in them like, “menschy” and “fierce”– unexpected, memorable, and useful words that staff can connect with and that help differentiate.

    Once you’ve established a list of about five adjectives that reflect the personality you’d like your organization to express consistently, consider bringing it to life in these ways.

    • Integrate your personality into hiring practices and training programs. Want to establish your organization as welcoming, warm, and embracing? Doing so means you need to hire people who are, themselves, likely to be those things, or at least know how to act that way. 
    • Create on-personality spaces, events, and partnerships. Paint the walls and put up artwork in your public spaces that reflect your personality. Pick event venues and partners whose personalities are “on brand” for you. 
    • Celebrate in personality-centric ways. Each week, a staff member at Big Duck gets to annoint next week’s “Duck of the Week”, an honorary, celebratory title with no responsibilities at all. The Duck of the Week celebration, along with others we integrate into our weekly Team Time, help us live our friendly personality trait. Similarly, sharing industry research, great case studies, and other resources each week keeps our team on our toes and better able to live our smart personality trait.
    • Use personality to guide which social media channels you use and how you use them. Is your organization inclusive, perhaps you should convene an online community. Do you want to get your supporters to see you as energetic and gutsy? Consider hosting a takeover of your Instagram or Twitter accounts. Intellectual and inquisitive? Ask questions and moderate spirited debates via comments or Facebook Live.


    Ready to get started putting positioning and personality into action? Read more on how to create a winning brand strategy on Big Duck’s blog or in my book, “Brandraising”, learn how we brought Auburn’s brand strategy to life, or give us a call.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • 7 Ways to Keep Your Nonprofit Development Team Intact
    Wednesday Apr 19, 2017

    Once you’ve hired experienced communications staff, how do you keep them happy and productive? Leading fundraising consultant, Amy Eisenstein, shares simple recommendations to strengthen relationships with your expert communicators and advice for keeping them on your team for the long haul.

    In my last video, I talked about the importance of development staff staying at their jobs and not job hopping. Today’s video is directed more at Executive Directors in an effort to help you keep your development staff members longer.

    Attention Executive Directors

    As you may know from experience, there’s no worse feeling than when a staff member quits or you need to fire them.

    Today I want to talk about how to prevent both of those things, so that you can keep your development staff for years or even decades.

    The reason this is important is that fundraising is really about relationships. Every time a development staff member leaves, you need to start over. All the relationships that person developed while working at your nonprofit are compromised. Your organization suffers, your donors suffer, and you lose precious fundraising ground.

    If you like your development director and believe they are doing a good job, you should do everything in your power to keep them.

    7 Ways to Retain Your Nonprofit Development Staff

    Here are 7 ways to keep your development staff (in no particular order). Best of all, most of these are low or no cost.

    1. Give more gratitude.
    Everyone loves to be appreciated. How often do you say “thank you” and “great job” to your development staff members? Those two words said often and with sincerity go a long way to keep your team happy.

    2. Provide a raise.
    Yes, there’s no getting around it. Many development directors leave for a higher salary. You may not think you can afford to pay them more, but just think about how much it will cost you when they leave. The fundraising ground you’ll lose… the donor relationships that are compromised.

    In addition, you’ll lose time and money from having a staffing void, you’ll need to retrain a new staff member, and spend money on the hiring process. Replacing a good fundraising staff person can cost anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 or more in lost fundraising revenue and costs associated with bringing on a new staff member.

    So why not save yourself the trouble and just give your existing staff members a raise?

    3. Allow for flex time.
    I realize you might be uncomfortable with flex time, but the reality is that most fundraising professionals work more than 40 hours per week. They’re expected to be available in the evenings and on weekends for events and meetings.

    So why not provide a little flex time so they can drop their kids off at school, take care of important personal tasks, or even just avoid some rush hour traffic.

    4. Be generous with time off.
    Around your events or busy times, offer a few extra days off. There’s no cheaper way to create good will and loyalty among staff members.

    Also, consider sending staff members home early or even at 5:00 (if they normally work later). Insist they leave to be with their families, get home in time to exercise, or even simply rest and relax. It will come back to you tenfold in hard work and loyalty in days and months to come.

    5. Encourage training and continuing education.
    Training and educational opportunities are a huge perk for most staff members. If you don’t have a large budget for training, offer to give staff paid time off to attend trainings on their own. Also, consider splitting the cost of training with them. After all, you’re both getting something out of it.

    Not only is staff training good for staff, but it’s good for you too. Research shows a significant return on investment for meaningful training opportunities like CFRE, multi-day conferences and college level courses. In fact, recent research found that meaningful major gift training yields an average of $37,000 in additional major gifts raised. That seems well worth the cost of a $2,000 or even $3,000 conference or course.

    6. Provide autonomy and room for growth.
    Don’t micromanage. Trust you development staff member to do a good job. Give them increasing levels of responsibility and trust them to work directly with board members and large donors. Then, simply check in and hold them accountable — but trust them to do their work on their own. They’ll be happier for it.

    7. Allow work from home.
    Have a great staff member or want to hire one you can’t afford? Consider a work-from-home arrangement. Maybe not full time, but one or two days per week to start.

    As someone who does work from home, I rarely work an 8 hour day. But I’m much more productive because I don’t have any colleagues interrupting me or impromptu meetings that keep me from getting the important stuff done.

    Remember — it’s not about the quantity of hours worked, it’s about quality of work done.

    Please also check out my recent post on how to create happy, healthy nonprofits.

    In the meantime, what else have you tried to keep your development staff members happy and productive? Leave a comment and share your ideas.

    Amy Eisenstein, ACFRE, is one of the country's leading fundraising consultants. She's raised millions of dollars for dozens of nonprofits through event planning, grant writing, capital campaigns, and major gift solicitations. She has a real talent for making fundraising simple and accessible for her clients and followers.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Using your brand strategy everyday in everything
    Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    If you’ve ever researched branding you’ve probably heard jargony terms like “brand proposition”, “brand promise”, ‘positioning”, “personality”, “voice”, or “unique selling proposition (USP)” tossed around.  Any rigorous rebranding process typically starts by establishing a clear strategy, using at least one, if not many, of these approaches. There are a lot of approaches for developing brand strategy, any one of which can help your team get clear on what you’re trying to communicate.

    A well-developed brand strategy should help everyone see how your strategic plan or mission comes to life in day-to-day communications, both inside your organization and outside of it. But too often, nonprofits and businesses view their brand strategy as something that’s only useful when creating a new logo or tagline-- not as something that can help transform how everyone in your organization communicates every day. When folks criticize branding as “navel-gazing”, decorative, or extraneous, it’s usually because the team behind it has developed it in a vacuum. A solid nonprofit brand must originate from and be deeply tied to its vision, mission, and values, and bring them to life in dynamic ways that inspire the hearts and minds of people inside and outside of the organization.

    Big Duck’s model for building strong nonprofit brands, which we call “brandraising”, uses two simple brand strategy concepts: Positioning and Personality. Both can help anyone on your staff– from your staff leadership and board to to your programs team and beyond– write, speak, and behave in ways that bring your mission to life and create a truly on-brand experience of your organization, head-to-toe.

    Positioning

    Positioning is the primary idea you want people to associate with your organization, and it’s a North Star everyone on your team can use to guide their actions daily. It’s closely
    related to your mission, but more focused on and oriented toward how you want to be perceived, not what you do.

    For example, Auburn’s mission is, “Auburn equips leaders with the organizational skills and spiritual resilience required to create lasting, positive impact in local communities, on the national stage, and around the world. We amplify voices and visions of faith and moral courage. We convene diverse leaders and cross-sector organizations for generative collaboration and multifaith understanding. And we research what’s working — and not — in theological education and social change-making.”

    Walk into their office or meet with their team and you’ll see that mission is used rigorously to inform their work. But that language isn’t easy for staff to remember and use with every interaction. Their positioning—“Auburn is the premier leadership development center for the multifaith movement for justice.”

    Publicly, Auburn shares and promotes its mission. Internally, its positioning statement gives staff a way to staff a tool to express their big idea so they can be sure that everything they do supports and advances it.

    Positioning is often reductive: a simplification of what you actually do. It’s hard to get it right, but when you do, it’s a useful pocket-tool you can grab handily on the fly.

    When developing your organization’s positioning statement, make sure yours is simple, clear, and usefully distinguishing from others in your space. Remember, it’s not always something you state publicly, so you can get away with things like “the leading organization...”, for instance, which could be problematic in public-facing language.

    Got your positioning pinned down? Here’s a few ways it can be used inside your organization for maximum value.

    • Integrate an overview of your mission and positioning into your onboarding trainings for new staff and board members. Make sure everyone is clear what they are and how to use them. Consider developing a set of role plays that give them a chance to practice.

    • Use positioning to guide how you write and speak. For example, give the positioning to the board member who’s going to speak at your upcoming event and frame it as the ‘cheat sheet’ for what they need to communicate about your organization.

    • Use positioning to help determine if new materials your vendors develop are on strategy. Does that new brochure or website, at a glance, support your positioning?

    Personality

    Personality is the tone and style your organization uses to communicate. It’s relatively easy to develop and can have a transformative effect; suddenly, everyone’s writing, speaking, and representing your organization consistently. (Read Farra’s article The Power of Brand Personality at your Nonprofit for more.)

    If positioning is a more perception, or communication-oriented way to think about your mission, than personality is a more perception or communication-oriented way to live and express your organization’s values for many (but not all) organizations.

    If you’ve ever taken a class at Soul Cycle you know their staff are dynamic examples of living the brand. No matter which location you visit, Soul Cycle staffers are unrelentingly friendly, helpful, and upbeat, no matter their role or level of seniority. Sure, they have bad days, but they are clearly trained to turn on the charm whenever a customer walks in. Wouldn’t it be nice if your staff were perceived that way by your donors, clients, and board members too? They can be-- but first you need to hire and train them to do so– otherwise, they’ll continue to do what most people do naturally, just be themselves,  for better and for worse.

    Auburn’s personality is Loving, Entrepreneurial, Courageous, Multifaith, Progressive, and Respected. This list of guiding attributes is distinguishing and practically useful for writing, speaking, and other external communications.

    Some of my favorite organizational personalities have had words in them like, “menschy” and “fierce”– unexpected, memorable, and useful words that staff can connect with and that help differentiate.

    Once you’ve established a list of about five adjectives that reflect the personality you’d like your organization to express consistently, consider bringing it to life in these ways.

    • Integrate your personality into hiring practices and training programs. Want to establish your organization as welcoming, warm, and embracing? Doing so means you need to hire people who are, themselves, likely to be those things, or at least know how to act that way.

    • Create on-personality spaces, events, and partnerships. Paint the walls and put up artwork in your public spaces that reflect your personality. Pick event venues and partners whose personalities are “on brand” for you.

    • Celebrate in personality-centric ways. Each week, a staff member at Big Duck gets to annoint next week’s “Duck of the Week”, an honorary, celebratory title with no responsibilities at all. The Duck of the Week celebration, along with others we integrate into our weekly Team Time, help us live our friendly personality trait. Similarly, sharing industry research, great case studies, and other resources each week keeps our team on our toes and better able to live our smart personality trait.

    • Use personality to guide which social media channels you use and how you use them. Is your organization inclusive, perhaps you should convene an online community. Do you want to get your supporters to see you as energetic and gutsy? Consider hosting a takeover of your Instagram or Twitter accounts. Intellectual and inquisitive? Ask questions and moderate spirited debates via comments or Facebook Live.

    Ready to get started putting positioning and personality into action? Read more on how to create a winning brand strategy on Big Duck’s blog or in my book, “Brandraising”, learn how we brought Auburn’s brand strategy to life, or give us a call.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • This Chatbot Therapist Is Goofy But Helpful 
    By Nick Douglas - Saturday Jun 10, 2017

    I’m very bad at processing my feelings alone. If I don’t want to spiral into anxiety, I need to process with a conversation partner: my wife, my friends, my therapist. But what do I do with all the bullshit little feelings that aren’t worth draining someone else’s time? I’m excited to try offloading this emotional…

    Read more...

    Source: Lifehacker
  • Google News Lab powers digital journalism training for Africa
    Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog