my lunch box inc.

2458 jericho tpke
garden city park, new york 11040

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
DECEMBER 02, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4494462

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - MY LUNCH BOX INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Five Sites of New York’s L.G.B.T. History
    Monday Jun 19, 2017

    Jacob Riis Park, a Manhattan church, the Bum Bum Bar and more. In 360 degrees, visit five sites that helped shape New York City’s L.G.B.T. community and its history.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Quebec a Canadian haven for quirky hotels
    By Margo Pfeiff - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    The handful of remaining elderly nuns then donated the building to a nonprofit organization that, after renovations, opened it in 2015 as a luxury 65-room hotel, retreat and wellness center. Once home to over 200 nuns, the elegant and unusual hotel is a blend of old and new, the no-frills monastery style converting well into a chic minimalist design with whitewashed walls, exposed wooden beams and floors, and wide hallways lined with portraits and statues leading to quiet retreats for meditation. The secular hotel’s mission is to carry on the Augustine philosophies of rejuvenating and healing its guests, now through meditation, aromatherapy, massage, yoga, holistic workshops and healthy food. For a true historical experience, I stay in one of Le Monastere’s 33 “authentic” rooms, simple former nuns’ quarters with Augustinian furniture and a single bed. An organic breakfast is served in the bright dining room in silence, according to monastery tradition, and I feel myself starting to unwind. Stepping down worn and creaky steps, I explore the hospital and Augustine museum with over 40,000 artifacts on the main floor, then head downstairs again into the massive new archives with more than half a mile of original manuscripts. The modern hotel celebrates indigenous connections, from rooms artfully decorated with fox and beaver pelts to the subtle flavors of wild herbs from the boreal forest on the lunch and dinner plates of their restaurant. Guests can join the daily Labrador tea ceremony in the lobby, learn how to make bannock, go dog sledding, strap on snowshoes to track caribou or sleep in the longhouse with a modern hotel room as a backup for convenience. In La Traite restaurant, renowned Quebec chef Martin Gagné offers multicourse tasting menus to highlight his creative takes on traditional native cuisine. The food is seasonal and might feature elk tartare, smoked eel, Quebec scallops with sea urchin butter, wild cattails with spicy birch syrup, red deer osso buco perfumed with bog myrtle or a fillet of seal. Quebec’s provincial park service — SEPAQ — has always dreamed up inspired ways to help people enjoy the wilderness with various levels of comfort in their 23 parks and nine wildlife reserves. The 320-square-foot studio layout of blond wood has a sleek Scandinavian feel and includes a well-equipped kitchen and compact bathroom with shower. There is electricity, hot water, wallboard heating, bean bag chairs for lounging in front of a small wood-burning stove, and a welcoming hammock swinging inside a screened porch. The cabins are available year round, and before I leave I’m already planning an EXP cross-country ski and snowshoe excursion when the snowflakes start falling. Just 30 minutes north of the city, North America’s only Ice Hotel since 2001 has 44 rooms and suites, each themed with different super-clear ice sculptures. The dazzling grand lobby and its chandelier, the chapel where you can tie the knot with the bride wearing a white fur coat, the three bars — and even the glass from which I sip local ice cider — are all made of ice. There’s also a modern hotel where every Ice Hotel guest has a backup room for modern conveniences. After a warm-up sauna and hot tub I head to my ice bed in a spectacular room with icebergs, polar bears and seals swimming along icy blue walls that can be up to four feet thick. Though the inside temperature is 41 F, the wooden frame and thermal mattress atop my ice bed and a weapons-grade down sleeping bag keep me warm throughout the night, dreaming about living atop an ice floe. Longhouse overnight package from $560 per night for a minimum of four people includes the cultural experience, a hotel room for modern conveniences and breakfast. Various packages and promotions might include activities from dog sledding to access to the adjacent Valcartier theme park complex including an indoor water park. www.valcartier.com/en/winter-playground Sleep in a suspended spheres or a glass geodesic dome in forest alongside Saguenay Fjord, 2 hours and 45 minutes northeast of Quebec City. Mont Tremblant Treehouses: 5000, ch. du Lac-Caribou, Saint-Faustin-Lac-Carré, Québec, 1-819 681-4994; www.refugesperches.com/en/our-treehouses Selection of tree houses in the Laurentian Mountains 1 hour 45 minutes north of Montreal. Three, four and six-course tasting menus often featuring unconventional First Nations’ ingredients prepared in an elegant fine dining restaurant by renowned Quebec chef, Martin Gagné.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Protesters Outside ‘Julius Caesar’ in Central Park, and Laughs Inside
    By EMILY PALMER and MAYA SALAM - Sunday Jun 18, 2017

    Just a day after the “Shakespeare in the Park” play was interrupted by protesters who rushed on stage, a few demonstrators picketed, and the production was adjusted to address the episode.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Charitybuzz Auctions Another Lunch With Eddy Cue at Apple's New Headquarters
    By Joe Rossignol - Monday Jul 10, 2017

    Charitybuzz today launched an auction in which the winning bidder will have lunch with Apple's services chief Eddy Cue at the company's newly constructed Apple Park headquarters in Cupertino, California.


    The auction has an estimated value of $50,000. Bids can be placed between now and Tuesday, July 25 at 12:01 p.m. Pacific Time, in support of non-profit organization Autism Movement Therapy, based in Van Nuys, California.

    Autism Movement Therapy works to provide expressive movement therapy and workplace readiness skills resulting in meaningful, dignified employment for individuals with autism and related disorders, according to Charitybuzz.

    Here's your chance to have lunch with Eddy Cue at the stunning new 175-acre Apple Headquarters in Cupertino, CA, where you will learn more about Apple's industry-leading content stores and online services. This is a rare opportunity to see "Apple Park" and engage in a one-on-one, in-depth conversation with one of the most innovative business minds of our generation.
    Cue offered a similar luncheon auction just a few weeks ago, raising $255,000 in support of the National Association of Basketball Coaches Foundation non-profit organization in Kansas City, Missouri.

    The private meet and greet will be scheduled at a mutually agreed upon date between August 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018. The winning bidder must be at least 18 or older. The cost of the meal and gratuity is included, but travel and accommodations are not. The experience cannot be resold, re-auctioned, or transferred.

    The lunch does not include a formal tour inside Apple Park facilities, and photography is not permitted, according to Charitybuzz.

    Cue, who is officially Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services, currently oversees the iTunes Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay, Siri, Apple Maps, iCloud, and Apple's iWork and iLife suites of productivity apps.

    Apple executives have participated in several Charitybuzz auctions over the years, with CEO Tim Cook most recently raising over $680,000 for the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Taste of Antigua: Mayan influence drives rising food scene
    By Margo Pfeiff - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    The morning sun has barely peeked up, but Antigua’s Mayan farmers’ market is already swarming with action, a chaotic kaleidoscope of vendors in vivid traditional clothing selling their produce. Guiding me through the Technicolor maze, chef Kenny Aldana points out neon-orange cashew fruit; avocados, mangoes and melons of all sizes and shapes; edible flowers; fresh fish; and meats including bizarre displays of dried iguanas. Bags filled, we return to the El Convento boutique hotel where Aldana holds court in the kitchen. At noon he delivers a market-sourced gourmet feast — chicken bathed in a luscious sauce of pepitoria (traditional roasted and ground squash seeds) with local izote flowers, baby zucchinis and a slice of jicama-like ichuntal lightly battered and fried, perched in a puddle of tomato puree with mild chile. Antigua, with its 18th century cobblestone streets and colonial Spanish architecture that earned it UNESCO World Heritage stature, has long been a cultural destination, charming and walkable with courtyards tucked off main avenues opening into lavish gardens, restaurants, bars and small hotels. “Guatemala is very diverse culturally, and cooks are starting to gain a sense of pride about it,” says New York and Argentina-trained local chef Rodrigo Aguilar, who specializes in pop up restaurants. Recently, a wave of younger cooks is showing our roots in a more globalized way, embracing change but respecting tradition by exploring the richness of our ingredients. The 5,029-foot altitude provides consistent temperatures between 76 and 82 degrees, an idyllic climate the early Spanish dubbed “eternal spring”, perfect for growing just about anything. After an insightful two-hour tour of the mountainside facilities, I sip the premium roast on the sunny dining terrace with a lively group of international caffeine enthusiasts. En route, church bells ring and horse-drawn carriages clatter across cobblestones beneath blossoming jacaranda trees raining mauve petals onto the sidewalk. Exotic hot pink and purple bursts of bougainvillea clamber over stone walls, and the air is filled with the smells of coffee, warm chocolate, tortillas, fresh bread and pastries. Frequent roof-rattling earthquakes that eventually persuaded the Spanish to move their capital to more stable Guatemala City have left picturesque remnants of convents, monasteries, churches, a prison and villas now repurposed as settings for pop-up restaurants, live music concerts, souvenir markets and movie screenings. Earthquakes are the growling side effect of three enormous steep-sided, often-active volcanoes that form the city’s backdrop. “The minerals in volcanic soil are responsible for our intensely flavorful produce,” explains Karin Rudberg of Caoba Farm, an organic farm/shop/learning center and cafe 20 minutes by foot from Antigua’s main square. Caoba also supplies many of Antigua’s best dining spots, and they are a diverse lot, from gourmet delis with innovative lunches like Epicure to traditional Guatemalan and European restaurants or those experimenting with various degrees of fusion. Sabe Rico — “tastes good” — is a welcoming warren of enterprise that includes a local deli, an on-site chocolateria, and a restaurant where fresh, healthy and often vegetarian takes on traditional dishes from enchiladas to chili rellenos are served amid a tropical garden. “I researched food vendors for six months, because I knew people wanted to try street food, but were afraid to get sick,” she says. Street food is actually illegal in Guatemala, but she guides guests to hole-in-the-wall mom-and-pop treasures and through the farmers’ market, where she whips out her Swiss Army knife for tasting bites. Prowling the shop-lined streets, I come across a chocolate museum and the remarkable Dulceria Doña María Gordillo, a landmark 1872 store decorated in religious relics and famous throughout Guatemala for its vast selection of artisan sweets made exactly as nuns did in the city for centuries to raise money. There are macaroons and marzipan, fig delights and candied squash in exquisite forms, but the addictive classic convent candy that will forever haunt me and many expat Guatemalans is canillitas de leche — literally “legs of milk” that melt in your mouth. Fat Cat lists a dozen ways you can have your coffee created, from French press and AeroPress to siphon and Chemex, along with an equally long list of local plantations from which beans are sourced. The coffee is so fresh and smooth that one day I couldn’t resist hitting three cafes, including La Parada and the Refuge, before heading to the rooftop Antigua Brewing Company bar for a craft beer to calm my caffeinated nerves with skyline views of volatile volcanoes. “Pour a little cusha on the floor for the dead,” Jose Mario Aguirre of La Cantina instructs me as a local crowd of hipsters settles into his funky, barn-board bar that, in the afternoon, morphs into an offbeat mixology workshop. The Mayan Drinks and Spirits School introduces keen liquor enthusiasts to cusha, a traditional and largely clandestine Mayan drink distilled from corn and fruit. “Usually we make pepian, tortillas, Guatemalan rice, a plantain desert and a corn flower drink called atol blanco,” says manager Anna Lena Hofmann. There are also frequent daily two-hour tours of the coffee plantations, processing facilities, roasters and including a tasting: $20. Garden cafe features farm-to-table cuisine for lunch and occasional dinners, often with live music.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
my lunch box inc garden city park ny