montour coffee house and wine bar LLC

208 n monroe st
watkins glen, new york 14891

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 22, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4610226

County
SCHUYLER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - MONTOUR COFFEE HOUSE AND WINE BAR LLC









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Former Army Ranger Glen Coffee eyes NFL comeback 7 years after retiring - Dallas Cowboys' Lucky Whitehead says stolen dog is 'home safely'
    By foxnewsonline@foxnews.com (Fox News Online) - Tuesday Jul 18, 2017

    Source: Fox News
  • Coffee recalled for containing Viagra-like ingredient
    By Fox News - Thursday Jul 20, 2017

    A company based in Texas has recalled a coffee product after a substance found in a drug used to treat erectile dysfunction was found in the product, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) confirmed. Bestherbs Coffee LLC has recalled all of its “New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Herbs Coffee” after the FDA said it found...

    Source: New York Post: News
  • Former Army Ranger Glen Coffee eyes NFL comeback 7 years after retiring
    Tuesday Jul 18, 2017

    Former Army Ranger Glen Coffee abruptly left the NFL in 2010, citing his faith -- but now he’s ready to get on the gridiron again.

    Source: Fox News Sports
  • One Day, One Place: On the water in the Windy City
    By Spud Hilton - Wednesday Jul 12, 2017

    Improvements in recent decades to the city’s water-related attractions — lakefront trails, Navy Pier renovation, the long overdue Chicago Riverwalk, an increase in water taxis — have made the waters here more of a destination the other 364 days of the year. From your hotel, get some breakfast — you can’t swing a Cubs jersey without hitting a coffee shop or cafe downtown — and find the Chicago Riverwalk, a manicured waterfront promenade that should have been built decades ago. Follow the Riverwalk toward Lake Michigan until you get to Urban Kayaks and get out on the water, either as part of a tour or by yourself (after proving basic skills). (Remember that there are plenty of water taxis and tour boats that have to navigate here, so pay attention to Urban Kayaks’ instructions and rules.) There’s an “intro paddle” every hour for beginning kayakers. Check out a bike-share Divvy Bike — or take the free shuttle — out to the Navy Pier, not just for the maritime history here, but because it’s a convenient jumping off point for lake-based cruises. Whether or not you stop at the museums — the Field Museum is worth exploring, but could take most of a day — pedal the bike back toward Riverwalk along the Lakefront Trail, a pleasant, flat bike and foot path that is a little cooler in summer if there’s a breeze off the lake. Bike back into town along the Riverwalk, drop off the bike and get a window seat (when possible) at the Kitchen, a hip, rustic “American bistro” with picture windows facing the river. have lunch and watch the boats passing below. Head for the Chicago Water Taxi dock below the Kitchen (or across the river on the Riverwalk at Clark Street), taking time to admire some of the bridge tender houses, the multistory cubicles at the ends of bridges that were lookout post and home for tenders paid to watch the bridges. Not only is there a baffling variety of architectural styles, but most have some form of historical plaque or art, including dramatic relief sculptures on the DuSable Bridge by Henry Hering and James Earle Fraser. If there’s time, the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum inhabits one of the houses — the door is on the Riverwalk at Michigan Avenue. Chinatown here isn’t quite as concentrated as in some cities, so stay on the water taxi back toward downtown and get off at the Riverwalk Clark dock. Conveniently, you’re steps from City Winery, a popular weekend and after-work wine bar that faces out onto a wide part of the Riverwalk that’s ideal for chilling on warm evenings. On Thursday evenings from now until Aug. 17 is the city’s Unifest on the River, an event that highlights the music, food and wine of Chicago’s sister cities around the world. If you haven’t had your fill of boats, Shoreline Sightseeing offers a few nighttime cruises, including trips for comedy and wine tasting that run from 8 to 9:30 p.m. Even if the comedy or wine isn’t great, the nighttime views of the city from the water are the attraction.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • One Day, One Place: Covering the waterfront, Monterey style
    By Mark C. Anderson - Friday Jun 2, 2017

    Monterey enjoys a lot of California’s firsts: its first newspaper, its first government building, its first theater and its first public school.Old Fisherman’s Wharf can now claim 103 years in existence, and there’s no shortage of sea lions to ogle, whales to watch and chowder samples to taste.The futuristic (and stylish) tea-and-coffee shop enjoys a great harborside deck, state-of-the-art $50,000 Alpha Dominche steeping chambers for the tea and an Italian masterpiece of a $20,000 La Marzocco machine for the Monterey joe.A short walk down the Coastal Recreation Trail skirts the same side of the harbor Water +Leaves overlooks, and delivers visitors to the best-kept historical — and scenic — secret by the bay: 25.3-acre Lower Presidio Park, part of the Defense Language Institute and a superlative place for stunning views, wide lawns and a museum.Illuminating State Park-guided tours of Old Monterey’s most interesting old buildings happen summer Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 and 2 p.m., and can include a look at the last whalebone sidewalk west of Mississippi.The Pacific House is where the tours start, near the same spot Commodore John Drake Sloat raised the American flag in 1846 and the oldest government building in California, the Custom House, a.k.a. state historical landmark No. 1.The Pacific House and its adobe walls invite wanders through the memorable museum that occupies part of the upstairs and the entire downstairs — with a grizzly bear that roars, American Indian artifacts, hide-and-tallow education, and a short movie on early Monterey history centering on the California Constitution (signed up the street at Colton Hall).Next door there’s a must-see, borrowed-from-another-era Memory Garden (behind the Pacific House), designed by Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., whose father was one of the designers of New York’s Central Park.The former Osio Adobe now hosts the best indie film house in Monterey County, and its conjoined sister spot, snappy-fresh and progressive Cafe Lumiere, serves craft beer and coffee that can be toted in to movies.Next door at the Crown and Anchor Pub, the decor is vintage maritime and dripping with character via randy-sea-faring-quote wallpaper in the bathrooms and polished brass and wood everywhere else.Wharf Marketplace, a relatively new multipurpose hub, was a landmark train station back when Monterey was a getaway for San Franciscans to visit the Del Monte Hotel (now part of the Naval Postgraduate School).After much City Council discussion, the station has been reborn as a open-layout space featuring a fresh produce section with goods grown almost entirely by its owners (Tanimura and Antle farm), a cafe (with locally adored Acme coffee, pastries and panini such as the popular Cuban), fresh juices and a prolific stash of hyperlocal cheeses, beers and wines, plus a tasting bar and barbecues on the weekend.Alvarado Street Brewery now occupies one of the oldest buildings in downtown, a former movie theater and men’s lodge, transforming a rotting space into a gleaming shrine to Great American Beer Fest medal-winning craft creations.[...] Restaurant 1833 famously enjoys more history — and ghosts — than any nightlife option, in a sprawling and intoxicating converted home of the same year, with Josh Perry styling intuitive tonics in the apothecary-style bar over a glowing onyx surface.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • The Dogpatch winery that is making synthetic wine
    By Esther Mobley - Thursday May 4, 2017

    [...] according to the government, it isn’t a winery. The startup, housed in a Dogpatch warehouse, produces synthetic wine: a petri-dish cocktail of ethanol, water, sugar and various chemical compounds, made not in a vineyard but in a lab. “We could make a Cab here that smells like a Moscato d’Asti,” says Alec Lee, a co-founder of Ava, as he takes me through the lab. The lab is divided into two rooms: one for data collection, one for data execution. In the first, samples of “real” wine are put through machines that perform gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to isolate and identify their chemical makeup. At $2.7 million, the lead investor in Ava’s seed round was Horizons Ventures, a Hong Kong venture firm that is also a major funder of Impossible Foods, of plant-based burger fame, and Modern Meadow, which biofabricates leather. Both Impossible Foods and Modern Meadow are proposing solutions to a fairly obvious issue: the ethics of how we use animals. [...] displayed behind a glass case, was Mike Grgich’s famous 1973 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay, winner of the Judgment of Paris. [...] they’re tackling Moscato. Synthetic wine would seem at odds with the belief systems of many sommeliers, and ironically, Decolongon had worked at a natural wine bar before joining Ava. “Going into this project I was scared of revealing it to my wine friends,” says Decolongon, who holds a sommelier certification and a level 4 diploma from the Wine and Spirits Education Trust. Lee talks about creating the ultimate delicious flavor profile — what he calls “digitally optimizing wines.” Is this Moscato, saccharine and untoned, what Americans want to drink? “There’s a snobbery in wine that doesn’t correspond with people’s actual taste,” he says. Ava can use an estimated 10 to 100 times less water than a traditional winery would, for starters, but the larger environmental issue is climate change. [...] Ava makes the case for replicating wines — re-creating and sharing specific, famous bottles like the 1973 Montelena. The goal will never be to make counterfeit wines — not pretending to be the ‘Mona Lisa,’ but printing ‘Mona Lisa’ posters. Eventually, Lee and Chua want to create synthetic versions of other luxury food products that, like wine, are resource-intensive, geographically limited and expensive. With just one wine expert on staff, I wonder if Ava can’t understand that the whole reason why people like me like wine in the first place is because it conveys a sense of place in a nuanced and mysterious way — we love it because we can’t fully understand it.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Wine
montour coffee house and wine bar llc watkins glen ny