mj-mc staff care agency, inc.

1575 east 19th street
2nd floor
brooklyn, new york 11230

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 03, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4398520

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - MJ-MC STAFF CARE AGENCY, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Cyclist Killed by Bus in New York’s First Citi Bike Fatality
    By MATTHEW HAAG and HANNAH ALANI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Dan Hanegby of Brooklyn fell under a bus’s tires in Chelsea. He worked for Credit Suisse and was once the top-ranked tennis player in Israel.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Martin Shkreli, ‘Pharma Bro,’ Prepares for Trial: ‘I’m So Innocent’
    By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    The former hedge fund manager, vilified by the public and politicians after increasing the price of a prescription drug, is facing eight counts of securities and wire fraud.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • With Health Law in Flux, Insurers Scramble to Meet Filing Deadline
    By REED ABELSON - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Anthem, a major player in the Obamacare exchanges, announced that it would withdraw from Wisconsin and Indiana next year, along with Ohio.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • New York City and James Blake Resolve Excessive-Force Claim
    By BENJAMIN MUELLER - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    As part of the deal with the former pro tennis player, the city will create a new position within the agency that investigates police misconduct.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Should you outsource your appeal writing this year-end season? Maybe, maybe not.
    Thursday Sep 29, 2016

    The year-end fundraising season is heating up! Time to sharpen your pencils and craft those appeals that will move your donors, right? But what if you’re swamped? Not a great writer? Outsourcing some aspects of your fundraising?

    Big Duck often works with nonprofits who need help with fundraising campaigns, but many organizations don’t have the budget to pass off every aspect of their campaign to a consultant, and others have great in-house capacity that’s smart to leverage, too.

    When should you keep the writing for your campaign in-house? When is it smarter to outsource to a writer or agency? Here’s what we’ve learned from helping our clients wrestle with these questions.

    When to use internal staff

    A nonprofit’s staff knows its mission, its language, its voice, and its community best. With all that already in their head, nonprofit communications staff may be able to knock out content that works well for your organization with relative ease.

    If you’re reading this and saying, “That’s sounds like my organization,” the next thing you should ask yourself is, “Are any of my staff truly writers?” And, “Are they the right kind of writers?” Many (most?) nonprofit staff wear a lot of different hats, some of which they are more suited to than others. That applies to different types of writing—someone who can craft great major donor asks or direct mail appeals may not have the skill set or expertise to write for email and social media, or to produce a cohesive multi-channel campaign with a strong narrative arc and theme that plays out across all components and channels.

    Further, producing effective fundraising copy takes a good amount of mental space and concentration. So, even if you have a good writer with the right kind of writing experience, it is worth considering if she will be able to dedicate the necessary time.  

    When to use a consultant

    Consultants will guarantee a certain quality because they use (or are) professional writers. They should dedicate the time your content needs because that is exactly what you’re paying them to do!

    An external writer or agency is also more likely than staff, who are in the weeds with your cause every single day, to find a surprising angle or add fresh new energy that will make your campaign more dynamic—and can even serve as a model to help re-energize your organization’s content beyond one campaign. And their ”outsider” perspective often helps them express your work in simpler terms that make it easier for donors to get it.

    Part of what external writers get paid for is to quickly build the expertise needed to produce strong appeals, so the level of intimacy they have at the outset with a nonprofit’s issues typically shouldn’t be a major roadblock. But if a nonprofit’s work and the issues it confronts are highly nuanced—and its audiences are the kind that will pay close attention to fine, even academic, points of its language—it may be important to find the right person or to make sure they will work closely with internal staff to get the details right.

    How to make the call

    The decision often comes down to two things, assuming budget isn’t an issue. First, whether you have a good writer on staff with the relevant experience and bandwidth needed to tackle the task, and how much you’re looking to push the way you communicate with this campaign.

    Depending on the specifics of your campaign, these questions may weigh on you differently. For example, if your campaign will consist of a single letter, it may be easy enough to just take care of it in-house, and bringing in a new perspective on one appeal might provide limited long-term value. But if you are producing a more complex multi-channel campaign, with multiple components that need to be versioned for a set of audience segments—it may be a gamechanger to work with an agency or other pro that is able to write for each context while weaving in a theme that helps make your case stronger with every appeal.

    Of course, the decision may not feel easy or obvious even if you easily fit into one of these scenarios, and in the end the choice is often something of a leap of faith. But, the issues outlined here will help you weigh the pros and cons, and come to the decision that feels best for you.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits