mg2013, LLC

2 cindy lane
stone ridge, new york 12484

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 01, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4466411

County
ULSTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - MG2013, LLC









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Trump’s Tough Talk on North Korea Puts Japan’s Leader in Delicate Spot
    By JONATHAN SOBLE - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    North Korea’s accelerating military advances — and President Trump’s volatile response — could complicate Japan’s close alliance with the United States.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • ‘Smallville’s’ Erica Durance to Replace Laura Benanti on ‘Supergirl’
    By Carli Velocci, provided by
    - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    “Unfortunately Laura, who Greg and I have worked with for years going back to ‘Eli Stone,’ was unable to continue in the role due to work commitments in NY,” executive producer Andrew Kreisberg said in a statement.Benanti played Kara’s mother Alura In-Ze, who died in the infamous Krypton explosion, but lives on as a computer that gives Kara advice.Durance played Clark Kent’s love interest and intrepid reporter for 141 episodes of the long-running Superman coming-of-age story.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • “Hacksaw Ridge” at the Venice Film Festival
    By Mick LaSalle - Sunday Sep 4, 2016

    “Hacksaw Ridge” is Mel Gibson’s Hollywood redemption, and on his own weird, twisted, neurotic, bloody, gory, violence-obsessed terms. I saw it this morning at the Venice Film Festival, and it’s a terrific movie — in every sense of the word terrific. It’s the story of Desmond Doss, who was either the first or the only

    Source: SFGATE.com: Maximum Strength Mick Blog
  • Watch Sharon Stone’s ‘Basic Instinct’ audition tape
    By Fox News - Thursday Aug 10, 2017

    The 59-year-old actress shared it for Wayback Wednesday.

    Source: New York Post: Entertainment
  • Uncork a perfect weekend in Anderson Valley
    By Tim Teichgraeber - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    When you finally pull into Cloverdale and take a hard left-hand turn onto Highway 128 toward Boonville, it feels as if you’re diving into a rabbit hole.Surrounded by heavily forested hillsides on both sides, Anderson Valley is a narrow conduit between the warm inland reaches of Mendocino County and the chilly, pristine Mendocino Coast.Champagne Louis Roederer bought a big property near Philo in 1982, raising many eyebrows and giving the region a massive surge of credibility for growing cool-climate Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Alsace varieties such as Pinot Gris and Riesling.Restaurants like the Bewildered Pig, homey locals’ hangout Lauren’s and artisanal pizza restaurant Stone and Embers all have raised the dining bar in recent years.What had been a rough-and-tumble logging community has transitioned into precious California wine country.[...] folks at Williams Selyem, Ted Lemon from Littorai, and Goldeneye developed some notoriety for Anderson Valley Pinot Noir, says Goldeneye’s Vice President of Winemaking Neil Bernardi.In 1996, Dan (Duckhorn) wanted to plant a flag in Anderson Valley, to invest in a group of estate vineyards up and down the valley, and to control quality from the ground up.Goldeneye is one of the benchmark producers in the valley these days, making lavish, refined Pinot Noirs that command $50 a bottle to more than $100 a bottle.A seated wine tasting at Goldeneye will run about $15 per person.Many of the other tasting rooms in Anderson Valley charge only $5 per person.Compared with some other destinations, a couple can save enough in tasting room fees to pay for a hotel room, either at a B&B on the Mendocino coast, or somewhere in the valley, such as the Madrones in Philo or the chic Boonville Hotel.[...] when you sidle up to the tasting room bar, you may well be talking to a founder of the winery.Kristy Charles’ parents planted some grapevines in 2001, right before she headed to San Luis Obispo for college, where she met her future husband, and Foursight winemaker, Joe Webb.Foursight’s estate-bottled wines are made in a sleek fashion that has become a common thread in Anderson Valley winemaking.Some of those young winemakers were bootstrappers looking to stake a claim, others were just hoping to catch a wave at someone else’s winery.Jason and Molly Drew moved to Mendocino County in 2004, buying a 26-acre apple orchard in the high-altitude Mendocino Ridge AVA that overlooks Anderson Valley.Sourcing grapes from both Anderson Valley and the Mendocino Ridge regions, Drew makes about six cool-climate, small-production Pinot Noirs and Syrahs (hundreds of cases of each), generally always under 14 percent alcohol that offer an insightful survey of the region’s elegant wines.Another up-and-comer in Anderson Valley is Baxter, a small production brand that has a charming tasting room in Philo.Balo, just across the highway from Goldeneye, is also a worthy stop, for great wines, the bocce courts and the laid-back atmosphere.Michelle and Tim Mullins broke ground on the estate in 2003, released their first wines in 2009, and opened their own winery and custom crush facility in 2012.Back then, at the annual Pinot Noir festival in May, you would go from table to table and there were good wines and not-so-good ones.There has been a sea change in the quality of fruit, and a lot of growers have transitioned to organic or biodynamic farming, says Mullins.The wines are just too good to ignore, and the independent spirit of the place sets it apart.Nine guest quarters in a Mediterranean-style residence that includes Stone and Embers restaurant and tasting rooms.An inn with 15 contemporary rooms (some detached) and Table 128, a modern roadhouse.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Hiking and biking County Mayo, Ireland’s Wild West
    By Larry Habegger - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Just 15 minutes earlier, I’d been abandoned by my wife and two teenage daughters, who refused to join me on our afternoon bike ride when the heavy sky began spitting rain. County Mayo is the kind of place that visitors imagine when they think of rural Ireland: whitewashed stone houses in impossibly green fields dotted with sheep; rolling hills that tumble into the sea or break off in sheer cliffs; narrow winding roads that lead to villages with pubs and fish markets; residents with an admirable patience who are happy to take a moment to chat; small towns with cozy cafes and restaurants serving local fare. We strolled around Westport, a thriving town with shops that ably serve both the community and visitors, and enjoyed the cafes and tearooms. [...] mostly because of dumb luck, we climbed Ireland’s holy mountain Croagh Patrick on the annual pilgrimage day when tens of thousands of people make the ascent, some of them barefoot as a way to do penance. [...] you don’t have to be a pilgrim to join the conga line slithering up the holy mountain. A statue of St. Patrick marks the starting point to the climb, but to get there we had to run the gantlet of souvenir stands selling rosaries, candles, portraits of the pope, images of Catholic saints, prayer books and various trinkets. A welcoming sign read, PREPARE TO MEET THY GOD. Dozens of people milled about apparently contemplating just that while gazing up at the rocky trail sprinkled with confetti-colored specks that turned out to be distant hikers. Strangers called out words of encouragement as stones clattered under our boots and nylon rustled against nylon. Within minutes, the view opened up over the pastures and hills; islands dotted the silver sea below. Teams of paramedics relaxed around first-aid tents, ready for the inevitable injuries. Some say the annual rite began in the Stone Age 5,000 years ago when people climbed to mark harvest season; others say it started 1,500 years ago. Up and up we went, slower than some, faster than others, and stopped after an hour for a snack on a ridge, preparing for the next hour, which would be a steep climb up unstable scree to the summit. Clouds drifted in and partially obscured the view, but we could see the trail thick with people climbing, descending, passing each other along the way. On the steep climb, the rocks shifted with every step, and it would be easy to twist an ankle, especially in the crowd. Step by step we made our way up with our many fellow climbers, and before we knew it we were at the top, where groups posed for photos and in the chapel a priest was saying Mass at a window above the throng. A cloud had settled on us, and we waited in the chill, snacking again, congratulating ourselves and others, hoping to get the full summit view. [...] 15 minutes later, the sun broke out and I was skimming along the paved path through the pastures with the wild sky above and shimmering Clew Bay below. Later, when I decided I didn’t need to wear my rain pants anymore, I stopped to take them off and shoot a few photos. The Greenway opened in April 2010 through the efforts of the Mayo County Council and the agreement of the landowners whose property the Greenway crosses. Even though the right of way followed the defunct rail line of Midlands Great Western Railway, the county needed their permission. Since it opened, statistics show a peak of about 1,000 people per day using the path, with an overall average of about 250 people per day in the June-August high season. The Greenway has produced some 130 seasonal and 60 off-season jobs, 7 bike rental companies, and several cafes and restaurants in Newport, Westport and Mulranny. The county has plans to restore a railroad station at the Mulranny Park Hotel, create an interpretive center, improve the pathway surface in some places, and restore old railway cottages as shelters with toilets and refreshments. Just before Newport, it skirted then crossed an inlet from the sea over the arched stone Burrishoole Bridge, and I coasted downhill in glorious sunshine into town for coffee at the Blue Bicycle Tea Rooms. If the rain came, I’d be just another fool let loose on the wind, but I’d dry out in no time by the turf fire in our cottage, a cup of tea in hand and the green pastures and glistening sea outside the window. In the town center, Willow Cafe Tea Room serves simple meals of soups, salads, sandwiches, quiches and lots of baked goods along with excellent coffee and teas. Kelly’s Kitchen serves full Irish breakfast and lunches with locally sourced meats from the adjacent butcher (all in the family), who’s been serving the community for decades.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
mg2013 llc stone ridge ny