mericel academy, inc.

1019 jericho turnpike
new hyde park, new york 11040

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 31, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4438652

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - MERICEL ACADEMY, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • At Walmart Academy, Training Better Managers. But With a Better Future?
    By MICHAEL CORKERY - Tuesday Aug 8, 2017

    A new program for store supervisors and department managers may make them better employees but may not help them reach the middle class.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • For 18 Hours, Cabbie Sat Dead in Front Seat
    By KIM BARKER - Monday Aug 14, 2017

    A driver parked his taxi to take a break in SoHo. He died behind the wheel. Then, for nearly a day, New Yorkers went about their lives — just feet from his body.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Meet the Graduates of Walmart Academy
    By MICHAEL CORKERY - Tuesday Aug 8, 2017

    Our reporter explains how a story about the retailer’s training program didn’t turn out as he expected — instead he learned about the trainees themselves.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Neighborhoods That Play Hard to Get
    By STEFANOS CHEN - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    In some New York neighborhoods, the housing stock is great, but turnover is so low, word of mouth is the best search engine.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • New York Today: New York Today: New Subway Clocks
    By JONATHAN WOLFE - Monday Aug 7, 2017

    Monday: Rolling out new subway clocks, the Corkscrew Theater Festival, and National Lighthouse Day.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • New science fiction and fantasy books
    By Michael Berry - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    In their new book, “The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.,” Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland devise a premise that feels both familiar and fresh, mixing magic and science to pleasurable effect.When Melisande Stokes, an adjunct professor in Harvard’s Department of Ancient and Classical Linguistics, meets Tristan Lyons, she has no inkling that he is a military intelligence operative who will change not only her life but the very course of history.The texts hint that magic is real and was once practiced widely — up until 1851, to be exact, when all the world’s technologies were brought together for the Great Exhibition in London’s Hyde Park.In her journal, Melisande writes, “Tristan’s hypothesis therefore held that this coming together, this conscious concentration of technological advancement all in one point of space-time, had dampened magic to the point where it fizzled out for good.”All he needs is to build a device known as an Ontic Decoherence Cavity and find a practitioner of magic (i.e. a witch) to travel in it.Unfortunately, once they succeed, neither he nor Mel anticipate all the paradoxical complications attendant upon moving individuals through time and space, from being stranded in San Francisco during the Gold Rush to unleashing a band of marauding Vikings on a Walmart to causing disastrous tears in the fabric of reality.Stephenson has many sterling qualities — a playful sense of humor, a willingness to tackle big subjects with accuracy and rigor, a facility with thriller plots that contain well-hidden surprises.Gabe Hudson’s new novel is much like its title character and teen narrator — goofy, eager-to-please and a bit annoying.Hatched on Earth but now an inhabitant of the Planet Blegwethia, Gork, the Terrible, is a dragon unlike the ones featured in “Beowulf” and “The Hobbit.”“Gork” takes place on Crown Day, when each male member of the senior class at WarWings Academy must win the love of a female dragon and make her his Queen for EggHarvest.A former editor at large for McSweeney’s and the author of the story collection “Dear Mr. President,” Hudson seems to be taking cues from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels and Douglas Adams’ “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” with perhaps a smattering of Kurt Vonnegut, Joseph Campbell and Mark Twain thrown in for good measure.Anyone who has ever sat through a teenage rom-com can chart the arc of this narrative, but the fun is in the gonzo, sci-fi/fantasy details.Short in terms of word count, the slim volume by the author of “Fog & Car” and “The Strangers” is stuffed with more complex ideas than many books three times its size.“Dear Cyborgs” is structured as a series of sometimes nesting, sometimes interrupting monologues, the speakers of which aren’t always clearly identified.The shifting perspectives allow Lim to switch moods, subjects and topics abruptly, lending the book a sense of unsettling unpredictability.In the framing narrative, two Asian American teens — one named Vu, the other with his given name unspecified — bond over comic books in suburban Ohio.Late in the book, one member of the superhero posse talks about his participation in a riot in San Francisco’s Presidio, where Google buses were overturned and torched.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Entertainment News
mericel academy inc new hyde park ny