mechanical design and installation limited liability company

118 state route 34
matawan, new jersey 07747

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 25, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4612549

County
RICHMOND

Jurisdiction
NEW JERSEY

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - MECHANICAL DESIGN AND INSTALLATION LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • What A Tangled Web
    Tuesday Feb 7, 2017

    The great physicist Richard Feynman famously said, "If you think you understand quantum mechanics, then you don't understand quantum mechanics." The same might be said of today's inter-relationshipsin healthcare. It was complex enough when there were merely companies, agencies, HCPs, hospitals, and a limited number of media platforms.

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Health
  • DimensionalMechanics Joins Rush to Bring A.I. to All
    By Benjamin Romano - Friday Jun 9, 2017

    When he was 13, Rajeev Dutt, inspired by science-fiction authors such as Isaac Asimov, envisioned a world with ubiquitous artificial intelligence. His startup, DimensionalMechanics, is one of many companies large and small trying to deliver on that vision. The company has built a set of software tools meant to make it easier for non-experts to […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Supreme Court Further Limits Plaintiffs' Venue Shopping
    Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The Supreme Court dealt a blow to consumer plaintiffs by limiting where lawsuits against companies with business in multiple states can be heard.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: U.S. Business
  • Subway Delays, Again, Disrupt Commutes; L.I.R.R. Will Offer Some Discounts
    By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    In what has become a seemingly weekly ritual, a series of problems cropped up across the city during the morning rush, including signal issues and a train with mechanical problems.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • iMac and MacBook Early Reviews: Iterative Updates With Welcome Performance Boosts
    By Mitchel Broussard - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    At the WWDC keynote on Monday, Apple announced a collection of hardware refreshes for the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac, which users are already able to order on Apple.com. Across the line of Macs, Apple added faster Kaby Lake processors, faster SSD options, made a Fusion Drive standard in the iMac, introduced more maximum RAM in the iMac, and improved GPUs.

    Now, the company has allowed members of the press to test out both the MacBook and iMac refreshes to see how the computers stack up in comparison to the previous generation, as well as to Apple's competition. Below we'll round up opinions on the MacBook, 21.5-inch iMac, and 27-inch iMac. As many sites noted, first impressions and reviews for the all-new iMac Pro aren't expected to arrive until later in the year, ahead of the computer's December launch.

    12-inch MacBook


    Apple sent reviewers the base 1.2GHz Core m3 model ($1,299) of the new 12-inch MacBook, and CNET came away largely impressed by the slightly beefed up machine. The site noted that the biggest and most welcome addition was found in the new and improved keyboard with a second generation butterfly mechanism, which has been adopted from the same keyboard on the MacBook Pro line from last year.
    Now the 12-inch MacBook has adopted that improved second-gen butterfly mechanism from the Pro line. Even using it in just a few initial typing sessions, I can totally tell the difference -- there's a click and spring to the keyboard that was lacking before. As someone who has typed hundreds of thousands of words across both previous generations of the 12-inch MacBook, I'm very pleasantly surprised by how good this keyboard feels.
    Otherwise, CNET liked the default Intel Core m3 CPU in the MacBook, which remains fine for activities like web browsing and streaming video but still lacks any sort of power needed for heavy multitasking or high-end video editing. Upgraded configurations of the MacBook are available with 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 ($1,599) and dual-core Core i7 ($1,749), along with available RAM bumps from 8GB to 16GB ($200), but Apple has kept review units focused on the base tier. All versions retain the MacBook's slim 2.03lb body and Retina display.

    Image via CNET

    Both The Verge and CNET noted that power users will remain disappointed with the MacBook, which still only has one USB-C port. But for everyday tasks and low-power activities, anyone who can get over the port and power limitations should still find a lot of usage out of the 12-inch MacBook in its third generation.

    The Verge:
    The big question a lot of people are asking is whether the little MacBook is finally over that power hump that’s kept users from switching over to it. I sadly cannot answer that for you, but my hunch is that the basic calculus isn’t going to change. If you need speed, get a MacBook Pro or a Windows PC or maybe even a MacBook Air.
    CNET:
    The improved keyboard and the faster CPU options feel like a real step forward, although the system is still not quite as updated as we'd like.

    You're still stuck with the same not-great 480p webcam, and there's just that single USB-C port for all your power and connectivity needs, which will be a deal-breaker for many. But if you can work with those limitations, this is the best version of the 12-inch MacBook yet.

    21.5-inch and 27-inch iMac


    For the refreshed iMacs, Apple sent out the top-of-the-line 4K stock configuration of the 21.5-inch iMac, with a 3.4GHz Core i5 processor, 8GB of RAM, and a 4GB Radeon Pro 560 GPU ($1,499). Engadget noted the slight speed advantage over previous generation iMacs when launching apps like Slack and Chrome, and called the inclusion of Apple's Fusion Drive "both overdue and still not enough," particularly on iMacs with 4K and 5K Retina displays.


    Additionally, Engadget appreciated the ultra-bright 500 nits display, two Thunderbolt 3 ports (which support USB-C), and Magic Keyboard with number pad (a $30 cost addition in the configuration screen). Otherwise, the site noted that users can expect the same aluminum design on the refreshed iMacs, and categorized the 21.5-inch iMac, particularly the lower-end configuration ($1,099), as a sweet spot for mainstream users who require a reliable machine.
    Really, it's only mainstream consumers and creative types with more-limited needs (or means) who can safely buy an all-in-one now. But for their purposes, I have no doubt that the iMac offers more generous specs than before for the money.
    The Verge tested the new 27-inch iMac with an Intel Core i7 4.2 GHz chip, 500GB of SSD storage, and 16GB of RAM ($2,899), and said that the difference between previous generation iMacs -- in regards to editing 4K video and large photo files -- was "instantly evident."

    The Verge wished that the iMac's screen was slightly less reflective

    To put the high-end iMac through its paces, the site described an editing test that used Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 with previews on max render quality, no external SSD support, with After Effects and Lightroom open at the same time, as well as about 15 Safari tabs. After all of this, The Verge still described the editing process as a "joy" and said that it was "flawless."
    That said, editing photos on this computer was a joy. The processing speed and accurate colors also helped, making it a fun experience. Seeing the changes happen almost instantaneously helped accelerate the editing process, but it also just made me experiment with photos more, which for a creative type does make a difference. It’s worth nothing I haven’t calibrated the monitor and have used the default color space “iMac,” which I’m assuming most of you will use anyway, and you won’t regret it.
    Mashable tested out the lower-specced 27-inch iMac model with an Intel Core i5 3.4 GHz chip and 8GB of DDR4 RAM ($1,799), and appreciated the richer colors and added brightness of the new display, stating that on the screen, "images move a giant step closer to reality." One design difference Mashable noted was a change to the Shift key on the new Magic Keyboard with number pad, which led to a few accidental single quote key presses. Still, small gripes like that didn't hurt the site's overall opinion of the computer.
    What matters is day-to-day performance on critical tasks in demanding apps like Photoshop, AutoCAD, and Strata 3D. Based on the numbers I saw and even my minute-to-minute experiences with the 27-inch iMac, I’d say it will handle all those jobs with ease.

    I did a bunch of other, more mundane tasks on the system, like Safari browsing, email, photo manipulation, and uploading. There were no issues and everything worked as it did before.
    With the first batch of iMac, MacBook, and MacBook Pro orders expected to arrive as soon as later this week or early next week, more opinions on the newly refreshed computers should be shared online in the coming days. For more impressions on Apple's just-announced products, check out a roundup of opinions regarding Apple's new smart speaker HomePod.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • When your communications plateau, think like a clock restorer
    Tuesday Apr 25, 2017

    In the hit podcast S-Town, listeners follow the story of John B. McLemore, an eccentric genius living in rural Alabama. John is a horologist, someone who specializes in the scientific study of time. He has a deep expertise in making and fixing elaborate clocks.

    Most clock repairers approach their work tactically—they can manage to get an old timepiece working again by tinkering with a couple of its parts. The clock might start ticking like new, but it probably won't last too long. By contrast, the best, most sought after horologists, like John, are able to gain an understanding of the whole apparatus—reviving the full machine back to life as originally designed.

    The majority of nonprofit communicators approach their work tactically—like clock restorers who tinker with a few pieces at a time hoping to get the machine ticking. Many nonprofits hit plateaus with their communications efforts because they approach their work in this fashion. They tend to work on “one-off” projects as needed, rather than envisioning their organization’s communications as an interconnected system that should be optimized to reach its goals and support the mission. This might mean working on a new brochure without thinking about how it relates to the website or managing social media without considering how these platforms fit into their broader goals for engagement.

    More nonprofit communicators need to be able to think like expert clock restorers: able to see, build, and fix the whole machine. Approaching communications as a strategic mechanism comprised of interrelated tactics takes effort and investment upfront, but generates stronger results in the end. The website, emails, social media, and print collateral should all be part of an ecosystem of efforts that reinforce and support each other.

    Math For America (MƒA) is a great example of the benefits of building an integrated communications machine for recruitment purposes. MƒA’s fellowships for public school STEM teachers enable educators to hone their skills, collaborate with peers, and access leadership opportunities—all on a generous stipend. But ad-hoc marketing—a brochure, flyer, or email here and there—for their programs wasn’t filling the pipeline with qualified teachers. They had hit a plateau in recruiting qualified educators even though their program was almost too good to be true.

    Limited expertise in marketing theory and strategy meant that staff were creating promotional materials (ads, brochures, flyers, etc.) tactically instead of strategically. Limited knowledge about their audiences meant that Math for America didn’t know how they were being perceived by teachers or what was holding back candidates from applying (and which benefits would motivate them to).

    After researching to uncover what the opportunities and barriers might be from the educators’ point of view, we worked with MƒA to build an informed and motivating machine for their communications efforts. After a year, Math for America’s fellowship programs went from being under-enrolled to over enrolled. They saw a 358%(!) increase in applications for their Master Teacher Fellowship. And because MƒA’s communications team began to think of their marketing as a machine, they shifted away from tinkering with the tactical toward strategic approaches that offer a far greater return on investment.

    If you want to see greater results from your communications efforts, take time to assess (or build) your communications machine. Your best bet is to approach your work like a clock restorer specialist—methodical, strategic, and looking at the whole picture. Chances are you’ll have to tackle some big questions first and put more time in upfront to develop a strategy and plan that is uniquely designed for your nonprofit’s goals and audiences. But it will pay off in the end.

    Are your communications efforts hitting a plateau? Take a look at the whole machine.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • SF Start-up "Social Teeth" Gains Political Bite
    Tuesday Aug 28, 2012

    Elaine Chang's latest venture is an online platform called Social Teeth, billed as a sort of Kickstarter for political ads. The San Francisco-based site is designed to showcase TV spots fromindependent advocacy groups and candidates that need funding for campaigns. There is a mechanism for supporters to donate funds via Stripe on the site.

    Source: Media Post: MAD SF
  • Tenement Museum in New York Names Its New President
    By JOSHUA BARONE - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    Kevin Jennings, a former nonprofit leader and Obama official, plans to expand the museum’s reach through virtual and augmented reality.

    Source: NYT > Home Page