love your uniqueness image and fashion consulting LLC

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 30, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4614715

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NEW YORK

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NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY RESERVATION

Name History
2014 - LOVE YOUR UNIQUENESS IMAGE AND FASHION CONSULTING LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Finding your nonprofit’s voice in the Trump era
    Tuesday Feb 7, 2017

    The last couple of weeks have been an emotionally draining and stressful time for so many of us who work in the nonprofit sector and are devoted to social justice and democratic values. Despite several alarming executive orders and appointees, it has been assuring to witness powerful and swift communications from nonprofit leaders of all types whose missions and values feel like they’re under attack (see Farra’s round-up of nonprofit leaders responding to the election). The fact is that the voices and actions of nonprofits are needed now more than ever, and it’s critical that organizations across all issues and areas seriously consider what role they can play in navigating through these uncertain political times.

    Some nonprofits whose missions are under threat but also have powerful advocacy programs and robust communications teams appear well equipped to respond to these crises and take the lead in mobilizing supporters to take action. Within moments of a new piece of breaking news from the White House, it seems like organizations like the ACLU and Planned Parenthood Federation of America have updated their websites with relevant content, urging their followers to take specific actions and donate.  

    Most nonprofits aren’t in the same position of power and capacity as the ACLU or Planned Parenthood to respond. Many nonprofits have missions that will be impacted more tangentially (or perhaps not at all) by national policies and politics. It can be hard to know how and what to communicate—what the next tweet should be, what statement to issue, how urgent to sound, what action to request. And it can be tempting—especially in such stressful and emotional times—to dial up all your communications, responding to every news announcement or headline. But such a reactive approach can spiral out of control fast, lead you to inflate your connection to a particular issue, and is just unsustainable for most communications teams running with limited staff and resources.

    Staying silent on current events that impact your communities may not be an option either. You might be perceived as out of touch, miss an opportunity to make a powerful statement about what you stand for, or leverage this moment for fundraising. What's the right communications approach for your nonprofit?

    Here are a few ideas to help your nonprofit make decisions now:

      • Brush up on your nonprofit’s guidelines for political activity: You probably already know if your nonprofit is a 501(c)(3) or a 501(c)(4), but now is a great time to remind yourself of the rules and guidelines associated with both, especially some of the limitations of a 501(c)(3) when it comes to politics. They’re a little murky, so read carefully, and consult with knowledgeable staff or lawyers to confirm. Here’s a resource to get the basics.
      • Get aligned on your stance: Figuring out how your organization responds to the political fire should be a shared decision. Hold a meeting among primary communicators, senior staff, and key board members to discuss your organization’s approach as well as roles and responsibilities.
      • Review your key organizational and communications goals: Keep your organization’s primary goals in mind (fundraising? systems change? education? recruitment?), determine how communications support them,and who you need to engage most to reach those goals. Have these priorities shifted as a result of this election? Was advocacy more of a secondary goal that’s now more primary? How do the results of this election influence your ability to reach these goals?
      • Consider your audience's point of view: Who are your audiences and what are their political views? Is your list made up of bleeding heart liberals? A mix of people from across the ideological spectrum? Craft your messages and actions with your audience's values and perspectives in mind.
      • Know how you can uniquely contribute: What can your nonprofit contribute to the conversation that’s different from other groups (e.g. putting a spotlight on real voices, issue expertise)? Prioritize issues that are most important for you to weigh in on. Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
      • Keep your brand in mind: It might be tempting to shift your organization’s tone and style now. But if you’re a social services organization and suddenly sound like a radical advocacy organization, it could be alarming and confusing to your audiences. Keep your tone in check and make sure you’re staying true to what your organization is all about. If your style is shifting, consider updating your brand’s voice alongside it. (We’ve got a brand check-up process that can help.

    How is your nonprofit navigating communications in the Trump era? We’d love to hear from you.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Ask the NY Giants: Socks with Sandals?
    Tuesday Sep 15, 2015

    Professional athletes like members of the New York Giants are the inspiration for the latest (counterintuitive) high-fashion trend: wearing socks with sandals. Photo: Stu Woo/The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • Google Finds Unique Method To Gather Map Data
    Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Jennifer Slegg, The SEM Post founder, reports that this Google test is a way to get information for Maps in organic search results after being tipped off by Frank Sandtmann, a sales consultant inHamburg.

    Source: Media Post: Search Marketing Daily
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Words to Avoid—2017 Edition
    Thursday Mar 2, 2017

    It’s 2017 and we’ve emerged from our post-inauguration fog to get back to the business of what we do best: Guide nonprofits toward clear, conscious, and engaging communication habits to stand out in this noisy world.

    Yearly disclaimer: We offer this list as a friendly guide towards making stronger, more thoughtful word choices in your everyday communications. What you find below may be the right—or only—choice at times, and that’s fine. But, with a little extra consideration, a much better word can almost always be used in its place.

    ____-driven
    I’d love to be driven to as many places as I’ve seen services and programs described as “data-driven” or “research-driven.” Instead of suggesting influence, take your reader on the ride! What research shapes your programs? How exactly does data inform what you do?

    Untapped (potential)
    To describe individuals who have been excluded from resources, tools, or opportunities to succeed, the sentiment makes sense, but is vague and ubiquitous. The dictionary tells me that “untapped” is actually best used to describe natural resources that haven’t been exploited yet. I don’t think the true function of potential (or anything) is to be used up until it’s extinguished. What does your participants’ potential actually look like?

    Empower
    This word serves social, family, and feminist organizations exceptionally, but I feel uncomfortable about its implications. The idea of giving authority, opportunities, or dignity to people when they should (ideally) have access to those resources in the first place emphasizes the one who’s doing the giving (and owns the power). If your program is meant to help people learn enriching skills, cultivate confidence, or find mentorship, say so specifically.

    Cutting-edge
    Ow!

    Iterative
    If you look this word up in the dictionary, you’ll find a tautological definition, “relating to or involving iteration, especially of a mathematical or computational process,” which wouldn’t be an issue—if you were talking about a math problem. But this jargon comes up far too often in nonprofit context, and for what purpose? If a process, plan, or development is very complex or involves multiple trials, maybe it’s useful to talk about it in a way that’s less alienating.

    Comprehensive
    As a shortcut to say your organization does everything, comprehensive hurts more than helps. The idea of doing it all does a nonprofit little service in differentiating who they are. If you really are doing everything in your field, by all means, use this word, but please make sure it’s true first. Otherwise, define your objectives and mission clearly for potential participants, donors, and supporters so your audiences personally connect with your unique slice of the pie.

    A special tip: Hyphens (-), en dashes (–), and em dashes (—) are not the same.
    This isn’t technically a word to avoid, but a lesson in clarity. The differences among these three lines are subtle, and when used improperly, don’t drastically change a sentence’s meaning, but please take note:

      • The hyphen (often improperly stylized -- as an em dash) should only be used to connect words that work together to form a single concept, such as “year-end” or “community-led.” 
      • The en dash middle child connects things across distances like, January–March or 1994–2017. 
      • Use the em dash (—) to add a thought within a sentence—as I have attempted to do here (and be sure to close that thought with another em dash if it’s in the middle of a sentence).

    This level of grammatical detail isn’t absolutely necessary to get your message across, but will certainly ensure consistency and convey expertise.

    That’s all for 2017, and I hope it helps. What words would you like to remove from office this year? We’d love to hear your nominations in the comments!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • We wear culture: Discover why we wear what we wear with Google Arts & Culture
    Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • We wear culture: Discover why we wear what we wear with Google Arts & Culture
    Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • Don’t Fall in Love With Me, She Said. He Wouldn’t Listen.
    By LOUISE RAFKIN - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    Time had not dissipated Devin Peralta’s yearning for the woman nicknamed Danger, his longtime friend, muse and future wife.

    Source: NYT > Home Page