long memory consulting LLC

160 buckland ave
rochester, new york 14618

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
DECEMBER 16, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4501050

County
MONROE

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
KENNETH RAMME
160 BUCKLAND AVE
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, 14618

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - LONG MEMORY CONSULTING LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Welcome to the softer side of gutted Sears stores
    By John Biggs - Monday Jun 12, 2017

     If there is any indication of the cultural import and effect of the “millennials” – a term I dislike for reasons I will explain later – look no further than America’s malls. The Baby Boomer hubris and NIMBYism that sent malls into further and further orbits from city centers has come home to roost and it promises to change the face of retail in a big way. First,… Read More

    Source: TechCrunch
  • Stonewall Inn Project to Preserve Stories Behind a Gay Rights Monument
    By SARAH MASLIN NIR - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    A $1 million grant will go toward conserving the oral histories of those who lived through the 1969 riots.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Distilled entanglement brings long-distance quantum communication closer
    By Chris Lee - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Send plus resend followed by careful measurement results in better entanglement.

    Source: Ars Technica
  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Books of The Times: In ‘Memory’s Last Breath,’ Remembering Life, Before It’s Too Late
    By JENNIFER SENIOR - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Gerda Saunders tries to analyze her dementia as dispassionately as possible in her new book.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Subway Delays, Again, Disrupt Commutes; L.I.R.R. Will Offer Some Discounts
    By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    In what has become a seemingly weekly ritual, a series of problems cropped up across the city during the morning rush, including signal issues and a train with mechanical problems.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Memorial Day
    By Tom Belford - Monday May 29, 2017

    Roger and I are taking the day off; it’s the end of  Memorial Day weekend in the States.   Since my coming of age in the Sixties, the US has fought wars and engaged in military actions some of which I actively opposed, but nothing should detract from paying honor to those who have given their lives in […]

    Source: The Agitator