life of reilley distilling and wine company LLC

4550 lincklaen road
cazenovia, new york 13035

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 12, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4457932

County
MADISON

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - LIFE OF REILLEY DISTILLING AND WINE COMPANY LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • A toast to love
    By Louise Rafkin - Thursday Sep 10, 2015

    Alan Kropf, a sommelier and director of education at Anchor Distilling Company, was undaunted by the notion of crafting a beverage metaphor about his new bride: “If Ashley were a beverage, she’d be a bottle of vintage Champagne: bubbly and bright, simple on the surface but infinitely complex,” he said. The couple met in 2010 when Ashley, now 36, arranged an interview for Alan, also the founder of Mutineer Magazine, which covers the beverage industry, with one of her clients. [...] when Alan, then living in Calaveras County, showed up, she remembers being struck that he was like the guy in high school who was “cool, alternative and outgoing.” “Most wine journalists aren’t cute young men,” she said. To snag him, she thought she’d wow him with her knowledge of Napa wineries. Nothing came of that first meeting, but a few months later, Alan noticed Ashley on Facebook and pinged her. [...] throughout their early courtship, Ashley faced an emotional challenge; her mentor, notable PR maverick Pam Hunter, was very sick. Over those first months, it became clear that Alan, in some ways a vagabond and rolling stone, was truly, inside, a rock. Close friends Steven and Claire Stull volunteered their private home as the venue, and the couple combined their culinary and beverage chops to curate an event that told the story of their courtship and relationship. World-class wines were served that echoed those that the couple had consumed on their path to the altar; food was prepared by celebrated chef Todd Humphries of Kitchen Door, a venue the couple frequent often. “Wedding beverages are overlooked because of cost, but we were able to provide great pairings for reasonable prices,” said Alan. With spirits from Anchor Distilling, they made four signature cocktails served by Napa bartender Jason Withrow. Throughout the party, the couple delivered handwritten letters to each guest telling their story and how those in their community had contributed to their lives. Weddings are about your partner, but also include the friends who are going to be there for both of us for our life together. Direct and sweet, with a good acid bite that pairs well with spicy food,” she said, “Alan is a perfect balance between sweet and warm, fiery and bright. Chef Todd Humphries of Kitchen Door

    Source: SFGATE.com: Union Squared
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Martha Stewart Launches a Wine Company
    Friday Apr 28, 2017

    Martha Stewart's empire now includes wine. WSJ's Charles Passy and Tanya Rivero discuss Stewart's new wine company and take a sip from her collection. Photo: Martha Stewart Wine Co.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Food & Drink
  • Perfecting Pinot at Clos de la Tech
    By Matt Kettmann - Thursday Aug 10, 2017

    Right now, on very small blocks of his vineyards, which ride the ridge between Half Moon Bay and Woodside, underground probes are monitoring water absorption rates and radioing that information to a central computer, which then relays it to irrigation valves powered by thumbnail-size solar panels.“In a typical vineyard, you can find plants that are dying for water and undercropping, and you can find plants that are waterlogged and producing poor-quality fruit,” said Rodgers.The resulting technology — which Rodgers is starting to sell through his startup company WaterBit Inc. — is likely to conserve water and ensure more evenly dispersed and ripened grapes.The Waterbit technology will be a boon for large commercial grape growers and other fruit and vegetable farmers, who also use their irrigation systems to distribute fertilizers, called “fertigation.”“My propensity is to do everything 100 percent without any compromise,” explained Rodgers, who began reading academic journals on wine, started tinkering with ways to control and monitor fermentation temperatures, and even built his own press.In 2000, they took the brand commercial and bought two more pieces of vineyard property closer to the ridgetop, including the steeply sloped, ocean-facing property above La Honda where they built their winery into underground caves.Clos de la Tech was developing technology along a similar path, so he reached out, toured the vineyard (“one of the most meticulous”) and winery (“almost like Disneyland”), and gave his spiel about how valuable it would be to collect these aromas and then sell them to large commercial producers whose wines needed better bouquets.“The next thing I know, they’re flying me out there to talk about the aroma collection and utilization project,” said Goldfarb, who returned to work the 2012 harvest at Clos de la Tech and was then taught how to manage the vineyards by the renowned viticulturist Rex Geitner, who died in 2013.While the aromatic capture project is currently caught in a regulatory limbo — despite wide interest, it’s unclear whether the feds would treat it as distilling, and arcane state laws need some tweaking — Goldfarb, Massey and Rodgers continue to test the scalability of their integrated fermentation control system with UC Davis.Being surrounded by a commitment to making the best wine possible, and the intelligence creativity, and mind power that’s fueling the operation is really exciting and motivating.“If you bring that kind of scientific inquisitiveness to winemaking, where you throw in a living thing, from the ground to the grapes to the microorganisms, the complexity goes up by a factor of thousands,” said Rodgers, who can explain tannin molecule differences, anthocyanin ratios and quercitin creation at the deepest of levels.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Wine
  • Shareholders Demand More Drastic Shifts at Nestlé
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    The changes requested by the Third Point hedge fund underscore the idea that legacy food brands must radically shake up their portfolios to remain profitable.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
life of reilley distilling and wine company llc cazenovia ny