li service connect inc.

3 somers court
farmingville, new york 11738

NYS Entity Status
INACTIVE - Dissolution (Jun 26, 2014)

NYS Filing Date
JULY 02, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4426010

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - LI SERVICE CONNECT INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • How Google Cloud is transforming Japanese businesses
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    This week, we welcomed 13,000 executives, developers, IT managers and partners to our largest Asia-Pacific Cloud event, Google Cloud Next Tokyo. During this event, we celebrated the many ways that Japanese companies such as Kewpie, Sony (and even cucumber farmers) have transformed and scaled their businesses using Google Cloud. 

    Since the launch of the Google Cloud Tokyo region last November, roughly 40 percent of Google Compute Engine core hour usage in Tokyo is from customers new to Google Cloud Platform (GCP). The number of new customers using Compute Engine has increased by an average of 21 percent monthly over the last three months, and the total number of paid customers in Japan has increased by 70 percent over the last year.

    By supplying compliance statements and documents for FISC — an important Japanese compliance standard — for both GCP and G Suite, we’re making it easier to do business with Google Cloud in Japan.

    Here are a few of the exciting announcements that came out of Next Tokyo:

    Retailers embracing enterprise innovation  

    One of the biggest retailers in Japan, FamilyMart, will work with Google’s Professional Services Organization to transform the way it works, reform its store operations, and build a retail model for the next generation. FamilyMart is using G Suite to facilitate a collaborative culture and transform its business to embrace an ever-changing landscape. Furthermore, it plans to use big data analysis and machine learning to develop new ways of managing store operations. The project, — dubbed “Famima 10x” — kicks off by introducing G Suite to facilitate a more flexible work style and encourage a more collaborative, innovative culture. 

    Modernizing food production with cloud computing, data analytics and machine learning

    Kewpie, a major food manufacturer in Japan famous for their mayonnaise, takes high standards of food production seriously. For its baby food, it used to depend on human eyes to evaluate 4 - 5 tons of food materials daily, per factory, to root out bad potato cubes — a labor-intensive task that required intense focus on the production line. But over the course of six months, Kewpie has tested Cloud Machine Learning Engine and TensorFlow to help identify the bad cubes. The results of the tests were so successful that Kewpie adopted the technology.

    Empowering employees to conduct effective data analysis

    Sony Network Communications Inc. is a division of Sony Group that develops and operates cloud services and applications for Sony group companies. It converted from Hive/Hadoop to BigQuery and established a data analysis platform based on BigQuery, called Private Data Management Platform. This not only reduces data preparation and maintenance costs, but also allows a wide range of employees — from data scientists to those who are only familiar with SQL — to conduct effective data analysis, which in turn made its data-driven business more productive than before.

    Collaborating with partners

    During Next Tokyo, we announced five new Japanese partners that will help Google Cloud better serve customers.

    • NTT Communications Corporation is a respected Japanese cloud solution provider and new Google Cloud partner that helps enterprises worldwide optimize their information and communications technology environments. GCP will connect with NTT Communications’ Enterprise Cloud, and NTT Communications plans to develop new services utilizing Google Cloud’s big data analysis and machine intelligence solutions. NTT Communications will use both G Suite and GCP to run its own business and will use its experiences to help both Japanese and international enterprises.

    • KDDI is already a key partner for G Suite and Chrome devices and will offer GCP to the Japanese market this summer, in addition to an expanded networking partnership.

    • Softbank has been a G Suite partner since 2011 and will expand the collaboration with Google Cloud to include solutions utilizing GCP in its offerings. As part of the collaboration, Softbank plans to link GCP with its own “White Cloud” service in addition to promoting next-generation workplaces with G Suite.

    • SORACOM, which uses cellular and LoRaWAN networks to provide connectivity for IoT devices, announced two new integrations with GCP. SORACOM Beam, its data transfer support service, now supports Google Cloud IoT Core, and SORACOM Funnel, its cloud resource adapter service, enables constrained devices to send messages to Google Cloud Pub/Sub. This means that a small, battery-powered sensor can keep sending data to GCP by LoRaWAN for months, for example.

    Create Cloud Spanner instances in Tokyo

    Cloud Spanner is the world’s first horizontally-scalable and strongly-consistent relational database service. It became generally available in May, delivering long-term value for our customers with mission-critical applications in the cloud, including customer authentication systems, business-transaction and inventory-management systems, and high-volume media systems that require low latency and high throughput. Starting today, customers can store data and create Spanner instances directly in our Tokyo region.

    Jamboard coming to Japan in 2018

    At Next Tokyo, businesses discussed how they can use technology to improve productivity, and make it easier for employees to work together. Jamboard, a digital whiteboard designed specifically for the cloud, allows employees to sketch their ideas whiteboard-style on a brilliant 4k display, and drop images, add notes and pull things directly from the web while they collaborate with team members from anywhere. This week, we announced that Jamboard will be generally available in Japan in 2018.

    Why Japanese companies are choosing Google Cloud

    For Kewpie, Sony and FamilyMart, Google’s track record building secure infrastructure all over the world was an important consideration for their move to Google Cloud. From energy-efficient data centers to custom servers to custom networking gear to a software-defined global backbone to specialized ASICs for machine learning, Google has been living cloud at scale for more than 15 years—and we bring all of it to bear in Google Cloud.

    We hope to see many of you as we go on the road to meet with customers and partners, and encourage you to learn more about upcoming Google Cloud events.

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • How Google Cloud is transforming Japanese businesses
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    This week, we welcomed 13,000 executives, developers, IT managers and partners to our largest Asia-Pacific Cloud event, Google Cloud Next Tokyo. During this event, we celebrated the many ways that Japanese companies such as Kewpie, Sony (and even cucumber farmers) have transformed and scaled their businesses using Google Cloud. 

    Since the launch of the Google Cloud Tokyo region last November, roughly 40 percent of Google Compute Engine core hour usage in Tokyo is from customers new to Google Cloud Platform (GCP). The number of new customers using Compute Engine has increased by an average of 21 percent monthly over the last three months, and the total number of paid customers in Japan has increased by 70 percent over the last year.

    By supplying compliance statements and documents for FISC — an important Japanese compliance standard — for both GCP and G Suite, we’re making it easier to do business with Google Cloud in Japan.

    Here are a few of the exciting announcements that came out of Next Tokyo:

    Retailers embracing enterprise innovation  

    One of the biggest retailers in Japan, FamilyMart, will work with Google’s Professional Services Organization to transform the way it works, reform its store operations, and build a retail model for the next generation. FamilyMart is using G Suite to facilitate a collaborative culture and transform its business to embrace an ever-changing landscape. Furthermore, it plans to use big data analysis and machine learning to develop new ways of managing store operations. The project, — dubbed “Famima 10x” — kicks off by introducing G Suite to facilitate a more flexible work style and encourage a more collaborative, innovative culture. 

    Modernizing food production with cloud computing, data analytics and machine learning

    Kewpie, a major food manufacturer in Japan famous for their mayonnaise, takes high standards of food production seriously. For its baby food, it used to depend on human eyes to evaluate 4 - 5 tons of food materials daily, per factory, to root out bad potato cubes — a labor-intensive task that required intense focus on the production line. But over the course of six months, Kewpie has tested Cloud Machine Learning Engine and TensorFlow to help identify the bad cubes. The results of the tests were so successful that Kewpie adopted the technology.

    Empowering employees to conduct effective data analysis

    Sony Network Communications Inc. is a division of Sony Group that develops and operates cloud services and applications for Sony group companies. It converted from Hive/Hadoop to BigQuery and established a data analysis platform based on BigQuery, called Private Data Management Platform. This not only reduces data preparation and maintenance costs, but also allows a wide range of employees — from data scientists to those who are only familiar with SQL — to conduct effective data analysis, which in turn made its data-driven business more productive than before.

    Collaborating with partners

    During Next Tokyo, we announced five new Japanese partners that will help Google Cloud better serve customers.

    • NTT Communications Corporation is a respected Japanese cloud solution provider and new Google Cloud partner that helps enterprises worldwide optimize their information and communications technology environments. GCP will connect with NTT Communications’ Enterprise Cloud, and NTT Communications plans to develop new services utilizing Google Cloud’s big data analysis and machine intelligence solutions. NTT Communications will use both G Suite and GCP to run its own business and will use its experiences to help both Japanese and international enterprises.

    • KDDI is already a key partner for G Suite and Chrome devices and will offer GCP to the Japanese market this summer, in addition to an expanded networking partnership.

    • Softbank has been a G Suite partner since 2011 and will expand the collaboration with Google Cloud to include solutions utilizing GCP in its offerings. As part of the collaboration, Softbank plans to link GCP with its own “White Cloud” service in addition to promoting next-generation workplaces with G Suite.

    • SORACOM, which uses cellular and LoRaWAN networks to provide connectivity for IoT devices, announced two new integrations with GCP. SORACOM Beam, its data transfer support service, now supports Google Cloud IoT Core, and SORACOM Funnel, its cloud resource adapter service, enables constrained devices to send messages to Google Cloud Pub/Sub. This means that a small, battery-powered sensor can keep sending data to GCP by LoRaWAN for months, for example.

    Create Cloud Spanner instances in Tokyo

    Cloud Spanner is the world’s first horizontally-scalable and strongly-consistent relational database service. It became generally available in May, delivering long-term value for our customers with mission-critical applications in the cloud, including customer authentication systems, business-transaction and inventory-management systems, and high-volume media systems that require low latency and high throughput. Starting today, customers can store data and create Spanner instances directly in our Tokyo region.

    Jamboard coming to Japan in 2018

    At Next Tokyo, businesses discussed how they can use technology to improve productivity, and make it easier for employees to work together. Jamboard, a digital whiteboard designed specifically for the cloud, allows employees to sketch their ideas whiteboard-style on a brilliant 4k display, and drop images, add notes and pull things directly from the web while they collaborate with team members from anywhere. This week, we announced that Jamboard will be generally available in Japan in 2018.

    Why Japanese companies are choosing Google Cloud

    For Kewpie, Sony and FamilyMart, Google’s track record building secure infrastructure all over the world was an important consideration for their move to Google Cloud. From energy-efficient data centers to custom servers to custom networking gear to a software-defined global backbone to specialized ASICs for machine learning, Google has been living cloud at scale for more than 15 years—and we bring all of it to bear in Google Cloud.

    We hope to see many of you as we go on the road to meet with customers and partners, and encourage you to learn more about upcoming Google Cloud events.

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • 29 Billion Connected Devices Projected; Video Leads The Way
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    More things are getting connected, which is driving more digital traffic.

    Mobile video traffic alone is expected to grow by 50% a year for the next five years, according to a new globalstudy.

    By that time, mobile video traffic will account for most (75%) of all mobile data traffic, according to the annual Ericsson Mobility Report.

    Global mobile data traffic isprojected to increase to eight times its current level by 2022. That will be the equivalent of a single subscriber streaming high definition video continuously for 4 million years, as one of the moreinteresting tidbits in the Ericsson report. It also would be the equivalent of 31 billion hours of continuous high definition video streaming.

    While video will lead the way, mobile datatraffic overall involves numerous other activities. Here’s the projected annual growth rate of each activity until 2022:

    • 50% -- Video
    • 38% -- Social networking
    • 34% -- Audio
    • 32% -- Software download
    • 22% -- Web browsing
    • 10% -- File sharing

    As yet another data stat, in 2022, monthly mobile data traffic peractive smartphone in North America will be reach a whopping 26 GB.

    The latest forecast is for 29 billion connected devices by 2022, of which about 18 billion will be related to the Internet ofThings.

    Connected IoT devices include connected cars, machines, sensors, point-of-sales terminals, consumer electronics and wearables.

    In the world of mobile, there now are moresubscriptions for smartphones than for basic phones, with the majority (55%) being smartphones, which also accounted for 80 of mobile phones sold in the first quarter of this year.

    The lengthystudy is filled with interesting stats. For example:

    • At the current rate of mobile broadband growth, 95% of the world’s population will have network coverage by 2022
    • More than 1 million new mobile broadband subscribers are being added every day through the end of 2022
    • There were 240 million new mobile broadband subscriptions in the first quarteralone
    • At the end of last year, there were 400 million IoT devices with cellular connections
    • There will be 1.5 billion IoT cellular connections by 2022

    The IoT trainhas long left the station.

     

     

     

    Source: Media Post: Video Daily
  • 29 Billion Connected Devices Projected; Video Leads The Way
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    More things are getting connected, which is driving more digital traffic.

    Mobile video traffic alone is expected to grow by 50% a year for the next five years, according to a new globalstudy.

    By that time, mobile video traffic will account for most (75%) of all mobile data traffic, according to the annual Ericsson Mobility Report.

    Global mobile data traffic isprojected to increase to eight times its current level by 2022. That will be the equivalent of a single subscriber streaming high definition video continuously for 4 million years, as one of the moreinteresting tidbits in the Ericsson report. It also would be the equivalent of 31 billion hours of continuous high definition video streaming.

    While video will lead the way, mobile datatraffic overall involves numerous other activities. Here’s the projected annual growth rate of each activity until 2022:

    • 50% -- Video
    • 38% -- Social networking
    • 34% -- Audio
    • 32% -- Software download
    • 22% -- Web browsing
    • 10% -- File sharing

    As yet another data stat, in 2022, monthly mobile data traffic peractive smartphone in North America will be reach a whopping 26 GB.

    The latest forecast is for 29 billion connected devices by 2022, of which about 18 billion will be related to the Internet ofThings.

    Connected IoT devices include connected cars, machines, sensors, point-of-sales terminals, consumer electronics and wearables.

    In the world of mobile, there now are moresubscriptions for smartphones than for basic phones, with the majority (55%) being smartphones, which also accounted for 80 of mobile phones sold in the first quarter of this year.

    The lengthystudy is filled with interesting stats. For example:

    • At the current rate of mobile broadband growth, 95% of the world’s population will have network coverage by 2022
    • More than 1 million new mobile broadband subscribers are being added every day through the end of 2022
    • There were 240 million new mobile broadband subscriptions in the first quarteralone
    • At the end of last year, there were 400 million IoT devices with cellular connections
    • There will be 1.5 billion IoT cellular connections by 2022

    The IoT trainhas long left the station.

     

     

     

    Source: Media Post: Mobile Marketing Daily
  • 29 Billion Connected Devices Projected; Video Leads The Way
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    More things are getting connected, which is driving more digital traffic.

    Mobile video traffic alone is expected to grow by 50% a year for the next five years, according to a new globalstudy.

    By that time, mobile video traffic will account for most (75%) of all mobile data traffic, according to the annual Ericsson Mobility Report.

    Global mobile data traffic isprojected to increase to eight times its current level by 2022. That will be the equivalent of a single subscriber streaming high definition video continuously for 4 million years, as one of the moreinteresting tidbits in the Ericsson report. It also would be the equivalent of 31 billion hours of continuous high definition video streaming.

    While video will lead the way, mobile datatraffic overall involves numerous other activities. Here’s the projected annual growth rate of each activity until 2022:

    • 50% -- Video
    • 38% -- Social networking
    • 34% -- Audio
    • 32% -- Software download
    • 22% -- Web browsing
    • 10% -- File sharing

    As yet another data stat, in 2022, monthly mobile data traffic peractive smartphone in North America will be reach a whopping 26 GB.

    The latest forecast is for 29 billion connected devices by 2022, of which about 18 billion will be related to the Internet ofThings.

    Connected IoT devices include connected cars, machines, sensors, point-of-sales terminals, consumer electronics and wearables.

    In the world of mobile, there now are moresubscriptions for smartphones than for basic phones, with the majority (55%) being smartphones, which also accounted for 80 of mobile phones sold in the first quarter of this year.

    The lengthystudy is filled with interesting stats. For example:

    • At the current rate of mobile broadband growth, 95% of the world’s population will have network coverage by 2022
    • More than 1 million new mobile broadband subscribers are being added every day through the end of 2022
    • There were 240 million new mobile broadband subscriptions in the first quarteralone
    • At the end of last year, there were 400 million IoT devices with cellular connections
    • There will be 1.5 billion IoT cellular connections by 2022

    The IoT trainhas long left the station.

     

     

     

    Source: Media Post: Social Media & Marketing Daily
  • The elusive millennials: are they worth chasing?
    Monday Dec 5, 2016

    Ah, millennials—they’re the constantly SnapChatting young people with attention spans that shorten every day. (I’m allowed to say this because I’m one of them!) As millennials make up more and more of the workforce and their buying power increases, organizations are obsessing about how to get them to care about their cause—and ultimately how to get them to give.

    This obsession has led to tons of research about the generation, and after doing a little digging, I noticed that the research doesn’t always match up. For instance, MobileCause said millennials give to causes, rather than specific organizations or brands, but Inc. 500 found millennials to be extremely brand loyal compared to other generations.

    So what’s the deal? Do millennials care about a specific organization or not? And how does that affect their likelihood to give? Big Duck’s new market research tool, the Brandraising Benchmark, also digs into questions like these, and our June survey returned some interesting results about young people:

    1. 18-34 year olds had some of the highest levels of awareness of participating organizations. This means they were more likely than other, older age groups to claim that they’d heard of a participating organization. This was true for nonprofits large and small, and across a variety of sectors.
    2. When asked about the importance of participating organizations’ mission statements, 18-34 year olds were more likely than any other age group to say the mission was very or extremely important. Again, true for nonprofits of all sizes and a variety of sectors.
    3. When asked about their likelihood to donate in the future, 18-34 year olds were more likely than all other age groups to say they probably or definitely would donate. Again, true for organizations large and small, and across sectors.

    So perhaps all the obsession over millennials is warranted: they’re aware of what’s going on in the nonprofit sector and excited about donating. What’s more, they seem to be aware of specific organizations (not just the issues behind them), so they may pay more attention to your brand than you might expect.

    My biggest takeaway about all of this is that developing a brand that inspires connection is more important than ever. Think Nike or Old Spice, and think fast because this age group has a lot of organizations vying for their attention.

    If you want to know what millennials (and other demographics) think of your organization specifically, sign up for our Brandraising Benchmark.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Words to Avoid—2017 Edition
    Thursday Mar 2, 2017

    It’s 2017 and we’ve emerged from our post-inauguration fog to get back to the business of what we do best: Guide nonprofits toward clear, conscious, and engaging communication habits to stand out in this noisy world.

    Yearly disclaimer: We offer this list as a friendly guide towards making stronger, more thoughtful word choices in your everyday communications. What you find below may be the right—or only—choice at times, and that’s fine. But, with a little extra consideration, a much better word can almost always be used in its place.

    ____-driven
    I’d love to be driven to as many places as I’ve seen services and programs described as “data-driven” or “research-driven.” Instead of suggesting influence, take your reader on the ride! What research shapes your programs? How exactly does data inform what you do?

    Untapped (potential)
    To describe individuals who have been excluded from resources, tools, or opportunities to succeed, the sentiment makes sense, but is vague and ubiquitous. The dictionary tells me that “untapped” is actually best used to describe natural resources that haven’t been exploited yet. I don’t think the true function of potential (or anything) is to be used up until it’s extinguished. What does your participants’ potential actually look like?

    Empower
    This word serves social, family, and feminist organizations exceptionally, but I feel uncomfortable about its implications. The idea of giving authority, opportunities, or dignity to people when they should (ideally) have access to those resources in the first place emphasizes the one who’s doing the giving (and owns the power). If your program is meant to help people learn enriching skills, cultivate confidence, or find mentorship, say so specifically.

    Cutting-edge
    Ow!

    Iterative
    If you look this word up in the dictionary, you’ll find a tautological definition, “relating to or involving iteration, especially of a mathematical or computational process,” which wouldn’t be an issue—if you were talking about a math problem. But this jargon comes up far too often in nonprofit context, and for what purpose? If a process, plan, or development is very complex or involves multiple trials, maybe it’s useful to talk about it in a way that’s less alienating.

    Comprehensive
    As a shortcut to say your organization does everything, comprehensive hurts more than helps. The idea of doing it all does a nonprofit little service in differentiating who they are. If you really are doing everything in your field, by all means, use this word, but please make sure it’s true first. Otherwise, define your objectives and mission clearly for potential participants, donors, and supporters so your audiences personally connect with your unique slice of the pie.

    A special tip: Hyphens (-), en dashes (–), and em dashes (—) are not the same.
    This isn’t technically a word to avoid, but a lesson in clarity. The differences among these three lines are subtle, and when used improperly, don’t drastically change a sentence’s meaning, but please take note:

      • The hyphen (often improperly stylized -- as an em dash) should only be used to connect words that work together to form a single concept, such as “year-end” or “community-led.” 
      • The en dash middle child connects things across distances like, January–March or 1994–2017. 
      • Use the em dash (—) to add a thought within a sentence—as I have attempted to do here (and be sure to close that thought with another em dash if it’s in the middle of a sentence).

    This level of grammatical detail isn’t absolutely necessary to get your message across, but will certainly ensure consistency and convey expertise.

    That’s all for 2017, and I hope it helps. What words would you like to remove from office this year? We’d love to hear your nominations in the comments!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits