li power systems inc.

561 old bridge road
northport, new york 11768

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 29, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4381232

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
SIDNEY BLAIR
561 OLD BRIDGE ROAD
NORTHPORT, NEW YORK, 11768

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - LI POWER SYSTEMS INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • LG to Unveil webOS-Powered TV
    By Min-Jeong Lee - Monday Dec 30, 2013

    South Korea’s LG Electronics Inc. will soon take the veils off a television model that will run on the webOS operating system, highlighting its ambition of creating a prominent operating system for so-called smart TVs.

    Source: All Things Digital
  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • How Google Cloud is transforming Japanese businesses
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • How Google Cloud is transforming Japanese businesses
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • A Slump in Tech Stocks That Leaves Some Investors Mystified
    By LANDON THOMAS Jr. - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    Shares of Netflix, Apple and other giant technology companies that have powered a market rally have taken an uncharacteristic pause.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Finding your nonprofit’s voice in the Trump era
    Tuesday Feb 7, 2017

    The last couple of weeks have been an emotionally draining and stressful time for so many of us who work in the nonprofit sector and are devoted to social justice and democratic values. Despite several alarming executive orders and appointees, it has been assuring to witness powerful and swift communications from nonprofit leaders of all types whose missions and values feel like they’re under attack (see Farra’s round-up of nonprofit leaders responding to the election). The fact is that the voices and actions of nonprofits are needed now more than ever, and it’s critical that organizations across all issues and areas seriously consider what role they can play in navigating through these uncertain political times.

    Some nonprofits whose missions are under threat but also have powerful advocacy programs and robust communications teams appear well equipped to respond to these crises and take the lead in mobilizing supporters to take action. Within moments of a new piece of breaking news from the White House, it seems like organizations like the ACLU and Planned Parenthood Federation of America have updated their websites with relevant content, urging their followers to take specific actions and donate.  

    Most nonprofits aren’t in the same position of power and capacity as the ACLU or Planned Parenthood to respond. Many nonprofits have missions that will be impacted more tangentially (or perhaps not at all) by national policies and politics. It can be hard to know how and what to communicate—what the next tweet should be, what statement to issue, how urgent to sound, what action to request. And it can be tempting—especially in such stressful and emotional times—to dial up all your communications, responding to every news announcement or headline. But such a reactive approach can spiral out of control fast, lead you to inflate your connection to a particular issue, and is just unsustainable for most communications teams running with limited staff and resources.

    Staying silent on current events that impact your communities may not be an option either. You might be perceived as out of touch, miss an opportunity to make a powerful statement about what you stand for, or leverage this moment for fundraising. What's the right communications approach for your nonprofit?

    Here are a few ideas to help your nonprofit make decisions now:

      • Brush up on your nonprofit’s guidelines for political activity: You probably already know if your nonprofit is a 501(c)(3) or a 501(c)(4), but now is a great time to remind yourself of the rules and guidelines associated with both, especially some of the limitations of a 501(c)(3) when it comes to politics. They’re a little murky, so read carefully, and consult with knowledgeable staff or lawyers to confirm. Here’s a resource to get the basics.
      • Get aligned on your stance: Figuring out how your organization responds to the political fire should be a shared decision. Hold a meeting among primary communicators, senior staff, and key board members to discuss your organization’s approach as well as roles and responsibilities.
      • Review your key organizational and communications goals: Keep your organization’s primary goals in mind (fundraising? systems change? education? recruitment?), determine how communications support them,and who you need to engage most to reach those goals. Have these priorities shifted as a result of this election? Was advocacy more of a secondary goal that’s now more primary? How do the results of this election influence your ability to reach these goals?
      • Consider your audience's point of view: Who are your audiences and what are their political views? Is your list made up of bleeding heart liberals? A mix of people from across the ideological spectrum? Craft your messages and actions with your audience's values and perspectives in mind.
      • Know how you can uniquely contribute: What can your nonprofit contribute to the conversation that’s different from other groups (e.g. putting a spotlight on real voices, issue expertise)? Prioritize issues that are most important for you to weigh in on. Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
      • Keep your brand in mind: It might be tempting to shift your organization’s tone and style now. But if you’re a social services organization and suddenly sound like a radical advocacy organization, it could be alarming and confusing to your audiences. Keep your tone in check and make sure you’re staying true to what your organization is all about. If your style is shifting, consider updating your brand’s voice alongside it. (We’ve got a brand check-up process that can help.

    How is your nonprofit navigating communications in the Trump era? We’d love to hear from you.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • The elusive millennials: are they worth chasing?
    Monday Dec 5, 2016

    Ah, millennials—they’re the constantly SnapChatting young people with attention spans that shorten every day. (I’m allowed to say this because I’m one of them!) As millennials make up more and more of the workforce and their buying power increases, organizations are obsessing about how to get them to care about their cause—and ultimately how to get them to give.

    This obsession has led to tons of research about the generation, and after doing a little digging, I noticed that the research doesn’t always match up. For instance, MobileCause said millennials give to causes, rather than specific organizations or brands, but Inc. 500 found millennials to be extremely brand loyal compared to other generations.

    So what’s the deal? Do millennials care about a specific organization or not? And how does that affect their likelihood to give? Big Duck’s new market research tool, the Brandraising Benchmark, also digs into questions like these, and our June survey returned some interesting results about young people:

    1. 18-34 year olds had some of the highest levels of awareness of participating organizations. This means they were more likely than other, older age groups to claim that they’d heard of a participating organization. This was true for nonprofits large and small, and across a variety of sectors.
    2. When asked about the importance of participating organizations’ mission statements, 18-34 year olds were more likely than any other age group to say the mission was very or extremely important. Again, true for nonprofits of all sizes and a variety of sectors.
    3. When asked about their likelihood to donate in the future, 18-34 year olds were more likely than all other age groups to say they probably or definitely would donate. Again, true for organizations large and small, and across sectors.

    So perhaps all the obsession over millennials is warranted: they’re aware of what’s going on in the nonprofit sector and excited about donating. What’s more, they seem to be aware of specific organizations (not just the issues behind them), so they may pay more attention to your brand than you might expect.

    My biggest takeaway about all of this is that developing a brand that inspires connection is more important than ever. Think Nike or Old Spice, and think fast because this age group has a lot of organizations vying for their attention.

    If you want to know what millennials (and other demographics) think of your organization specifically, sign up for our Brandraising Benchmark.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • The Must-Do First Step in Creating a Profitable Fundraising Plan
    By Gail Perry - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    A fundraising assessment. A development office audit. A SWOT of your fundraising program.

    What are these things?

    They're the first step to creating a killer fundraising strategy that can unlock your fundraising potential.

    No kidding.

    Before you can create a strategy and a plan of execution, you have to step back and assess where you are.

    This is time to calmly, dispassionately take stock, examine what you have to work with, and evaluate how well things are working.

    A fundraising assessment gives you the opportunity to look at your fundraising program analytically.

    Without emotion. Without drama. No more crisis mode fundraising!

    A Fundraising Assessment can tell you a lot.

    • You can identify current successes and where you can build them up.
    • You can identify where the easy money might be that you are missing.
    • You can identify unproductive time wasters like certain fundraising events, that are not worth the trouble.

    5 Steps to a Thoughtful Fundraising Assessment

    1. Pull together your data.

    What does your data tell you?

    What are the trends?

    How about the numbers of current donors  - are they trending up or down?

    How about your donor renewal rates and donor attrition?

    Event attendees? How about the number of donors in your annual gift clubs?

    What about major gifts? Are you tracking Major Gift visits and asks?

    You know what I love about data? The numbers don't really lie. They are pretty straightforward, in black and white.

    Always start with the data when you want to make a plan. 

    2. Ask the tough questions.

    When you do a fundraising assessment you have permission to ask politically awkward questions.

    You can ask Cage Rattling Questions like:

    Can we be honest about what's working and what's not working?

    Are we wiling to ditch unproductive programs?

    You can get an entire list of "tough questions" to ask about your fundraising strategy in last week's post here.

    3. Assess each fundraising program's current results.

    Review all your various fundraising programs - mailings, events, major gifts, grants, corporate and foundation support, digital strategies. What results are you getting?

    • What's working well? What's working not so well?
    • What trends are on the rise?
    • What strategies are not paying off like they used to?

    You should be able to see where your opportunities might be if you shift your focus.

    You might be able to add resources somewhere and receive a significant jump up in revenue.

    Don't forget to assess other aspects that impact your fundraising success:

    It can be fun - and enlightening - to step back and evaluate everything.  Include your board in this discussion! 

    4. Identify your fundraising challenges.

    Yes, challenges are a part of life.

    If you want to know how much you can raise, you must be willing to acknowledge what's not working so well.

    • Are there people who are impediments to good fundraising?
    • What's NOT working? Where are you wasting time?
    • Are you losing too many donors each year?
    • Have you cut your fundraising budget and staff but not your fundraising expectations?
    • Is your staff totally run ragged?
    • Is your signature event losing steam?

    Just be realistic.

    Please.

    Wistful thinking is not going to raise your money!

    Being realistic will lead to smart decisions and planning.

    Being realistic will help you sleep at night too.

    Always try to turn your challenges into your opportunities!

    5. Identify your fundraising opportunities.

    Every organization has special opportunities. What are yours?

    Perhaps you have:

    • A great location in town.
    • A cause that is suddenly very popular.
    • Were you recently in the news?
    • A very popular gala or event.
    • A new CEO or leader.
    • New internet or social media talent joining your team.
    • Is your board suddenly interested in helping?

    Take a look around. You might find some surprises you can play up and run with.

    Sometimes amazing results can happen by building on opportunities.

    Can you form a coalition? Can you build on key relationships?

    Be alert. Be strategic. Be opportunistic, even.

    Maybe a key relationship can offer opportunities to catapult your organization to a whole new level.

    Pull it all together in your Fundraising Assessment.

    • How effective is our current fundraising plan?
    • Where can we increase your fundraising revenue streams?
    • Where do we need to focus time, energy and resources?
    • Where can we increase our efficiency?

    Bottom Line: What's holding YOU back from raising big money?

    I can help you answer these questions with my Highly Profitable Fundraising Planning Toolkit.

    You have a template to perform your own SWOT and Fundraising Assessment of your own program.

    You'll have a 10-Point set of checklists to help you determine where your best opportunities are.

    I'll help you step back from the weeds and look at how you can raise money in new and better ways.

    When you create a smart, strategic Fundraising Plan for the coming year, you'll be organized. You'll be happier. And your organization will raise more money!

    QUESTION: what are your challenges with your own Fundraising Assessment?

    Leave a comment and let us know!

     

    The post The Must-Do First Step in Creating a Profitable Fundraising Plan appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry