li kickboxing, inc.

92-13 102 street
richmond hill, new york 11418

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 04, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4383584

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - LI KICKBOXING, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • On Golf: Golfer Known as ‘Beef’ Has PB&J and No Complaints
    By KAREN CROUSE - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    Andrew Johnston, who was two under par after two rounds at the United States Open, has endeared himself to fans with his good-natured personality.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Yahoo Completes Sale Of Business To Verizon
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Yahoo on Tuesday said it completed the sale of its operating media business to Verizon Communications for approximately $4.48 billion. As previously announced, on June 16, 2017, the remaining part ofYahoo will change its name to Altaba Inc. Verizon will combine Yahoo with AOL properties to create Oath.

    Source: Media Post: Search Marketing Daily
  • Yahoo Completes Sale Of Business To Verizon
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Yahoo on Tuesday said it completed the sale of its operating media business to Verizon Communications for approximately $4.48 billion. As previously announced, on June 16, 2017, the remaining part ofYahoo will change its name to Altaba Inc. Verizon will combine Yahoo with AOL properties to create Oath.

    Source: Media Post: MediaDailyNews
  • Mid-Level Donors = Low Hanging Fruit?
    By Gail Perry - Friday Apr 7, 2017

    Mid-Level Donors.

    We're all talking about these lovely folks in your data base who are already giving significantly - and the potential they offer.

    But what to do with them, when you are already practically burdened by too much to do??

    Today, here's a clear 5-step plan upgrade your mid-donors and take them to new giving heights.

    We'll follow the basic, fundamental principles of fundraising:

    • Know who to ask.
    • Know their interest in what you do.
    • Have a compelling case for your work.
    • Make an ask for a specific amount.
    • Meaningful acknowledgement and appreciation of their support.

    And we'll apply these fundamentals to the “middle donors” in your database who have capacity to give more.

    Here are five steps to start transforming your mid-level donors into major gift donors.

    1. Good Data and Segmentation.

    All good fundraising starts or stops here - with your data.

    You need good reports and information about donors in your database records.

    If you can’t create reports and segment your donors by first gift, last gift, largest gift, and cumulative giving, stop what you are doing today and fix your data management (Email us, we can help).

    WHO are your mid-level donors?

    Look on your reports for where your donors tend to group. It could be $100-$200, $500-$1,000, or higher.

    Identify your mid-donor range and start reviewing your lists for capacity.

    Look for:

    • Cumulative giving (Indicates level of commitment to the organization)
    • Largest gift (for example, $100 every year but 4 years ago gave $1,200)
    • Other simple research to ID giving potential:
      • Gifts to other organizations
      • Political giving (opensecrets.org)
      • Home value (zwillow.com)

    One of the best investments you can make is to bring in a create a college intern or a volunteer to help research donors.

    I’ve done this multiple times and they discovered invaluable information that was so helpful.

    2. Know Your Mid-Level Donors.

    Try these steps:

    • Start with the top donors - the highest identified capacity.
    • Work your way down the list.
    • Set aside time every week for calls and meetings to say thank you.
    • Ask them: “Why do you support our organization?”

    This simple question will start to tell you how to move your $100 donor to $1,000, your $500 donor to $5,000, and up. Maybe use a volunteer to make thank you phone calls to them.

    Be sure to record the info a donor shares in their database record.

    That information gives you the basis create a solicitation plan - either one-on-one cultivation, or an upgrade appeal letter.

    You choose.

    But do make a plan for each capacity donor that will lead to a either an in-person or an appeal Ask.

    3. Ask Organizational Questions

    Before you create a plan to upgrade middle donors, ask these important questions internally:

    • What would our organization do with additional revenue?
    • What mission objectives will be achieved?
    • How will it appeal to the reasons donors have shared about why they support our organization?

    The answers to these questions will guide all of your communications and all the upgrade appeals you send to middle donors.

    Of course, you must be specific when ask for an upgrade.

    So you let donors know what your organization wants to accomplish, how much it will cost, and how their gift at a certain level will make a difference. 

    4. Create a Project Plan for Mid-Level Donors.

    Now you have:

    • Data that outlines your mid-donor potential,
    • Feedback from the donors themselves,
    • Some research on your top identified prospects.

    NOW . . . . . it’s time for a PLAN.

    It's time to start treating your middle donors like major donors and upgrade their giving.

    A basic plan for ANY Mid-Level Donor Program.

    1. Assign top mid-level prospects for one-on-one cultivation and solicitation.

    2. Review your data often on your mid-donor segments. (there's always "juicy" potential there!)

    3. Send customized communications and upgrade appeals. Send them to segmented donor groups based on steps 2 and 3 above.

    4. Create a new mid-level donor recognition program, or expand your existing giving society to include these donors. Then it's easy to give them special communications, recognition at events, include them in special publications and on website, etc.

    5. Find a Matching Gift to help launch your mid-donor program.  A matching gift is easy to solicit.  Donors love seeing their gift multiplied!

    5. Work the Plan and Manage Your Time.

    Prioritize time for you and your team to execute your mid-donor plan.

    To stay organized, I create a weekly work plan that includes the priority tasks to execute all annual development plan activities that must be done.

    Anything else that needs to get done that week will have to fit in the open time, or it gets moved back. (You can do this, right??)

    Don’t let the busy get in the way of the necessary.

    Keep an eye on use of staff time and ROI for your middle donor efforts.

    If you can create and effectively manage this kind of plan, it can have a major impact on what your organization can achieve overall.

    You'll develop closer relationships and retention of these important middle donors.

    AND you'll expand your major gift prospect pipeline and gifts.

    Bottom Line: What is your middle donor success story? Let us hear what’s worked for you.

    Need help planning and implementing a mid-level donor program? Email us, we can help.

    This is a guest post by our new fabulous new Fired-Up Fundraising colleague, Dan Bruer.

    Dan Bruer has over 18 years experience in fundraising and nonprofit management, developing and leading comprehensive fundraising programs and capital campaigns for regional and national non-profit organizations and universities, including University of Missouri-Columbia, UNC-Chapel Hill, American Red Cross, and major national conservation organizations. He specializes in major gift and midlevel donor programs. We are thrilled to welcome him to our team.

    The post Mid-Level Donors = Low Hanging Fruit? appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry
  • Suggested reading for nonprofit communicators
    Thursday Apr 6, 2017

    Every Fall, I teach a course on strategic communications at New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service (and Sarah teaches in the Spring!) It will likely come as no surprise the the core textbook for the class is Brandraising: How Nonprofits Raise Visibility and Money Through Smart Communications (Jossey-Bass, 2009).  The seven-week courses provides an overview of branding and communications concepts, helping students approach communications in a way that builds commitment to their organization’s mission, increases trust, creates ambassadors, and strengthens impact. We dig into case studies, interview guest speakers, watch TED talks and more.

    Because I teach the class once/year, I like to revisit the curriculum, bring in new materials and assignments, phase out materials that didn’t work, and generally strive to make it better. In this attempt to improve the readings, I asked friends and colleagues for their recommendations on LinkedIn and Facebook. The resulting list was incredible. Take a look at these great books  and feel free to add your own in the comments. My hope is that you too can use it to learn, share, and grow.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits