lessmore foundation center of hope and opportunity inc

110 madison st
mastic, new york 11950

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 22, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4625746

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - LESSMORE FOUNDATION CENTER OF HOPE AND OPPORTUNITY INC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Stonewall Inn Project to Preserve Stories Behind a Gay Rights Monument
    By SARAH MASLIN NIR - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    A $1 million grant will go toward conserving the oral histories of those who lived through the 1969 riots.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Miley Cyrus, Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez at Robin Hood Foundation’s Gala
    By VALERIYA SAFRONOVA - Wednesday May 17, 2017

    The annual antipoverty benefit, held at the Javits Center, raised more than $54 million and drew 3,700 attendees.

    Source: New York Times
  • The High Value of Your Nonprofit’s Values
    Wednesday Jan 25, 2017

    I was delighted to participate as a steering committee in the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s inaugural Spark Prize, an exciting new grantmaking initiative. I was truly impressed with how the Foundation integrated its values into every aspect of this project and leveraged them as a strategic decision-making tool in the grant review process, so I asked their fabulous DIrector of Communications, Liane Stegmaier, to write about it.  - Sarah Durham

    This month, Brooklyn Community Foundation marks the third anniversary of Brooklyn Insights—an extensive Brooklyn-wide community engagement project launched shortly after our President Cecilia Clarke joined the Foundation, which ultimately produced a bold grantmaking strategy that has since garnered national recognition.

    And coincidentally, on this anniversary we are announcing the recipients of our new Spark Prize—one of the Foundation’s highest-profile grantmaking efforts to date, awarding 5 outstanding Brooklyn nonprofits with no-strings-attached grants of $100,000 each in recognition of their service to Brooklyn, commitment to equity and justice, strong organizational values, and dynamic vision for the future.

    While we’re often asked about the major themes surfaced through our 1,000-plus Brooklyn Insights’ community conversations, the core grantmaking strategies we’ve since focused on, or our new institution-wide Racial Justice Lens—in this blog, we’re going to focus on the set of values that emerged during Brooklyn Insights that not only helped the Foundation determine our new direction, but continue to guide us and inform new initiatives like the Spark Prize.

    Of course, we knew three years ago that creating a community-led strategy might also lead us to change our mission statement and vision. But what we didn’t fully appreciate at the time was that while mission and vision are critical for moving us forward, strong institutional values are necessary to define who we are as an institution and how we hold ourselves accountable to these pursuits each and every day.

    Over the six months of listening to Brooklynites tell us about the challenges they faced in their communities, the opportunities they saw for change, and the roles we as their Community Foundation could play, we also heard loud and clear a call for us to be a different kind of institution: one that wears its values on its sleeve, keeps the doors open, and always positions community voices at the fore of its work.

    This call led us to articulate five new values for Brooklyn Community Foundation:

    • Courage. We believe in fearlessly identifying barriers to change and we fight for solutions that help overcome injustice.

    • Creativity. We believe that the power of imagination is greater than the challenges we face. We celebrate what works. We pursue the new. We learn as much from failure as we do from success.

    • Honesty. We are committed to being open and trustworthy in all we do and seek partners who share our values.

    • Collaboration. We believe in creating solutions together, harnessing the diversity of Brooklyn, and partnering with the community to spark change and produce results.

    • Respect. We believe in every resident’s dignity and basic human rights, and honor diversity of race, gender and background.

    We’ve come to refer to these values at every test in our decision-making, we talk about them in our Board meetings, staff meetings, and annual staff reviews, and they’ve informed our ongoing racial justice and equity trainings.

    And with the new Spark Prize, we are spotlighting the importance of strong values, and celebrating 5 Brooklyn nonprofits for their exemplary values-driven work. The first-ever recipients of the Spark Prize are Audre Lorde Project, Common Justice, Make the Road New York, MoCADA, and Neighbors Together.

    A committee of approximately 30 Brooklyn civic, business and philanthropic leaders (including Big Duck’s own Sarah Durham!) selected the 5 organizations from an applicant pool of over 150. They were chosen on the basis of a 1,000 word essay, followed by in person interviews where each spoke to the role their values play in their organization and how they align with the Foundation’s values.

    In their application, Audre Lorde Project stated that their values are rooted in transparency, wellness, transformation, cultural work and coalition building. “Collaboration with other social justice organizations is central to ALP’s intersectional, movement-building work.”

    Make the Road wrote that their values are why their 19,000+ members shape all of their campaigns: “Our youth challenge oppression by naming the disparate treatment of black and brown, LGBTQ and immigrant young people …. Their passionate advocacy has resulted in huge movement victories.”

    MoCADA isa museum founded on principles of justice, equity, and inclusion….courage, creativity and collaboration are the key elements of our mission, vision and values.”

    Neighbors Together’s work isgrounded in our belief in the dignity and potential of each person to be a vital part of creating a more just society” and its members have the courage “to fight for real and lasting solutions to overcome injustice.”

    And last but not least, Common Justice highlighted each of their values in their application—demonstrating a deep connection between their values and the unique nature of their healing work between victims and perpetrators of violence:

    • Accountability. We are responsible for our actions, our words, our power, and our impacts. We know that accountability affirms the dignity and humanity both of those responsible and of those harmed, and we hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold others. 

    • Transparency. We are transparent about our actions, our intentions, our options, and our decisions. We communicate with clarity and consistency with those impacted by what we do. 

    • Transformation. We believe in the potential of all human beings to transform, heal, grow, change, and be resilient. We believe we all deserve individuals, communities, and institutions that support us in being our best selves. 

    • Respect. We believe in the inherent worth, importance, rights, culture, and strengths of all people, and work to reflect and honor that in the way we behave toward others. 

    • Purpose. We uphold the responsibilities and boundaries of our work because we are ambitious, hopeful, and outcomes-driven. 

    These 5 values send a powerful message, and are a primary reason Common Justice is receiving the Spark Prize in our inaugural year.

    As nonprofit communicators, we are all very familiar with the adage “Show, Don’t Tell.”

    Mission tells us what you do; values show who you are.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Alexandria Debuts NY’s Latest Bio Incubator With 13 Startups in Tow
    By Ben Fidler - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    A new startup incubator has just opened in Manhattan this morning, adding to a growing list of facilities meant to help support seedling New York City biotechs. LaunchLabs, first announced by Alexandria Real Estate Equities a year ago, officially opened its doors and revealed the 13 startups that will grow there. LaunchLabs is a 15,000-square-foot […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • Alexandria Debuts NY’s Latest Bio Incubator With 13 Startups in Tow
    By Ben Fidler - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    A new startup incubator has just opened in Manhattan this morning, adding to a growing list of facilities meant to help support seedling New York City biotechs. LaunchLabs, first announced by Alexandria Real Estate Equities a year ago, officially opened its doors and revealed the 13 startups that will grow there. LaunchLabs is a 15,000-square-foot […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Precision Steps: Can Loxo Drug Help Broaden Use of Cancer DNA Tests?
    By Ben Fidler - Saturday Jun 3, 2017

    When the FDA last week approved Merck’s cancer drug pembrolizuamb (Keytruda) for tumors with a specific genetic signature, regardless of what body part they originated in, it was a watershed moment for oncology and a victory for the concept of precision medicine. But Merck isn’t alone; others are following suit with similar plans, and their […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits