k mac realty, LLC

5 acorn lane
commack, new york 11725

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 21, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4580745

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - K MAC REALTY, LLC
2014 - K MAC REALITY, LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Get ready for 'spring cleaning' in foreclosures
    By podcast@wsj.com (MarketWatch.com) - Thursday Dec 11, 2014

    RealtyTrac sees foreclosures at pre-recession levels early next year, and banks gearing up for some "spring cleaning."

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: MarketWatch News Break
  • Target Display Mode not supported by new iMacs
    By Roman Loyola - By Roman Loyola - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    Target Display Mode is a useful feature for iMac owners who also own other Macs. It allows you to use the iMac’s display as an external screen for the other Mac.

    Unfortunately, Target Display Mode is no longer available in the recently released 2017 iMac. As first reported by AppleInsider, Apple confirmed that Target Display Mode has come to an end, and that future iMacs will not have the feature.

    Target Display Mode was actually discontinued by Apple on 2014. The 27-inch Retina 5K iMac released in October 2014 was the first model to not support the feature.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Source: Macworld
  • Teardown of New 4K 21.5-inch iMac Reveals Removable RAM and Modular CPU
    By Tim Hardwick - Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    iFixit has published a teardown of the new 4K 21.5-inch iMac, which reveals that – surprisingly – Apple's smallest all-in-one desktop machine has both removable RAM and a Kaby Lake processor that's not soldered onto the logic board.

    iFixit made the discovery by disassembling Apple's $1,299 mid-range 3.0GHz stock option, which includes 8GB of 2400MHz DDR4 memory, a Radeon Pro 555 graphics card with 2GB of VRAM, and a 1TB 5400-RPM hard drive.


    After slicing through the adhesive that secures the 4K display to the iMac's housing and removing the power supply, hard drive, and fan, iFixit discovered that the memory modules aren't soldered onto the logic board like previous models, but instead sit in two removable SO-DIMM slots.

    Similarly, after detaching the heatsink and removing the warranty voiding stickers on the backside of the logic board, iFixit found that the Intel SR32W Core i5-7400 Kaby Lake processor sits in a standard LGA 1151 CPU socket, making it possible to replace or upgrade the CPU without a reflow station.

    As iFixit notes, an upgradeable iMac is a big shift in direction from Apple. The last 21.5-inch iMac with expandable memory was the 2013 model, while the last to include a modular CPU came in 2012. iFixit speculates that the change to a socketed processor may be because Intel's desktop class Kaby Lake line-up currently lacks any permanently mountable chips, but it's conceivable Apple could have requested one if it so chose.


    It's important to note that Apple officially considers these parts non-user-replaceable, which is easy to see given the relative difficulty accessing them – compare the work involved in accessing the 21.5-inch iMac's RAM slots, with the external memory hatch found in the 27-inch iMacs, for example. That said, the fact that replacing these components is practically possible will come as music to the ears of tinkerers armed with the right tools and instructions.

    Despite the upgradeable RAM and CPU, iFixit awarded the 2017 21.5-inch iMac a 3 out of 10 for repairability (10 being easiest to repair) because of the challenge involved in accessing the components. Still, that's an improvement on the 2015 model, which was given a 1 out of 10 for repairability.

    Other minor changes of note discovered in the teardown include a single microphone below the iMac's LG-manufactured display (where previously there were dual mics), a replaceable CMOS battery, and an upgradeable 3.5-inch SATA hard drive, but no SSD connector.

    Check out the full teardown on the iFixit website.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • iMac and MacBook Early Reviews: Iterative Updates With Welcome Performance Boosts
    By Mitchel Broussard - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    At the WWDC keynote on Monday, Apple announced a collection of hardware refreshes for the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac, which users are already able to order on Apple.com. Across the line of Macs, Apple added faster Kaby Lake processors, faster SSD options, made a Fusion Drive standard in the iMac, introduced more maximum RAM in the iMac, and improved GPUs.

    Now, the company has allowed members of the press to test out both the MacBook and iMac refreshes to see how the computers stack up in comparison to the previous generation, as well as to Apple's competition. Below we'll round up opinions on the MacBook, 21.5-inch iMac, and 27-inch iMac. As many sites noted, first impressions and reviews for the all-new iMac Pro aren't expected to arrive until later in the year, ahead of the computer's December launch.

    12-inch MacBook


    Apple sent reviewers the base 1.2GHz Core m3 model ($1,299) of the new 12-inch MacBook, and CNET came away largely impressed by the slightly beefed up machine. The site noted that the biggest and most welcome addition was found in the new and improved keyboard with a second generation butterfly mechanism, which has been adopted from the same keyboard on the MacBook Pro line from last year.
    Now the 12-inch MacBook has adopted that improved second-gen butterfly mechanism from the Pro line. Even using it in just a few initial typing sessions, I can totally tell the difference -- there's a click and spring to the keyboard that was lacking before. As someone who has typed hundreds of thousands of words across both previous generations of the 12-inch MacBook, I'm very pleasantly surprised by how good this keyboard feels.
    Otherwise, CNET liked the default Intel Core m3 CPU in the MacBook, which remains fine for activities like web browsing and streaming video but still lacks any sort of power needed for heavy multitasking or high-end video editing. Upgraded configurations of the MacBook are available with 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 ($1,599) and dual-core Core i7 ($1,749), along with available RAM bumps from 8GB to 16GB ($200), but Apple has kept review units focused on the base tier. All versions retain the MacBook's slim 2.03lb body and Retina display.

    Image via CNET

    Both The Verge and CNET noted that power users will remain disappointed with the MacBook, which still only has one USB-C port. But for everyday tasks and low-power activities, anyone who can get over the port and power limitations should still find a lot of usage out of the 12-inch MacBook in its third generation.

    The Verge:
    The big question a lot of people are asking is whether the little MacBook is finally over that power hump that’s kept users from switching over to it. I sadly cannot answer that for you, but my hunch is that the basic calculus isn’t going to change. If you need speed, get a MacBook Pro or a Windows PC or maybe even a MacBook Air.
    CNET:
    The improved keyboard and the faster CPU options feel like a real step forward, although the system is still not quite as updated as we'd like.

    You're still stuck with the same not-great 480p webcam, and there's just that single USB-C port for all your power and connectivity needs, which will be a deal-breaker for many. But if you can work with those limitations, this is the best version of the 12-inch MacBook yet.

    21.5-inch and 27-inch iMac


    For the refreshed iMacs, Apple sent out the top-of-the-line 4K stock configuration of the 21.5-inch iMac, with a 3.4GHz Core i5 processor, 8GB of RAM, and a 4GB Radeon Pro 560 GPU ($1,499). Engadget noted the slight speed advantage over previous generation iMacs when launching apps like Slack and Chrome, and called the inclusion of Apple's Fusion Drive "both overdue and still not enough," particularly on iMacs with 4K and 5K Retina displays.


    Additionally, Engadget appreciated the ultra-bright 500 nits display, two Thunderbolt 3 ports (which support USB-C), and Magic Keyboard with number pad (a $30 cost addition in the configuration screen). Otherwise, the site noted that users can expect the same aluminum design on the refreshed iMacs, and categorized the 21.5-inch iMac, particularly the lower-end configuration ($1,099), as a sweet spot for mainstream users who require a reliable machine.
    Really, it's only mainstream consumers and creative types with more-limited needs (or means) who can safely buy an all-in-one now. But for their purposes, I have no doubt that the iMac offers more generous specs than before for the money.
    The Verge tested the new 27-inch iMac with an Intel Core i7 4.2 GHz chip, 500GB of SSD storage, and 16GB of RAM ($2,899), and said that the difference between previous generation iMacs -- in regards to editing 4K video and large photo files -- was "instantly evident."

    The Verge wished that the iMac's screen was slightly less reflective

    To put the high-end iMac through its paces, the site described an editing test that used Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 with previews on max render quality, no external SSD support, with After Effects and Lightroom open at the same time, as well as about 15 Safari tabs. After all of this, The Verge still described the editing process as a "joy" and said that it was "flawless."
    That said, editing photos on this computer was a joy. The processing speed and accurate colors also helped, making it a fun experience. Seeing the changes happen almost instantaneously helped accelerate the editing process, but it also just made me experiment with photos more, which for a creative type does make a difference. It’s worth nothing I haven’t calibrated the monitor and have used the default color space “iMac,” which I’m assuming most of you will use anyway, and you won’t regret it.
    Mashable tested out the lower-specced 27-inch iMac model with an Intel Core i5 3.4 GHz chip and 8GB of DDR4 RAM ($1,799), and appreciated the richer colors and added brightness of the new display, stating that on the screen, "images move a giant step closer to reality." One design difference Mashable noted was a change to the Shift key on the new Magic Keyboard with number pad, which led to a few accidental single quote key presses. Still, small gripes like that didn't hurt the site's overall opinion of the computer.
    What matters is day-to-day performance on critical tasks in demanding apps like Photoshop, AutoCAD, and Strata 3D. Based on the numbers I saw and even my minute-to-minute experiences with the 27-inch iMac, I’d say it will handle all those jobs with ease.

    I did a bunch of other, more mundane tasks on the system, like Safari browsing, email, photo manipulation, and uploading. There were no issues and everything worked as it did before.
    With the first batch of iMac, MacBook, and MacBook Pro orders expected to arrive as soon as later this week or early next week, more opinions on the newly refreshed computers should be shared online in the coming days. For more impressions on Apple's just-announced products, check out a roundup of opinions regarding Apple's new smart speaker HomePod.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Apple Seeds Second Beta of macOS High Sierra to Developers
    By Juli Clover - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Apple today seeded the second beta of an upcoming macOS High Sierra update to developers for testing purposes, a little over two weeks after introducing the new software and releasing the first beta at its 2017 Worldwide Developers Conference.

    The new beta can be downloaded from the Apple Developer Center, and once installed, subsequent betas will be available through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store.

    Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

    macOS High Sierra introduces new core storage, video, and graphics technology. The update supports the new Apple File System (APFS) and High Efficiency Video Codec (HEVC), plus it introduces an updated version of Metal with support for VR and external GPUs.

    Photos is being updated with a new sidebar that makes it easier to access editing tools and albums, and there are new editing options like Curves and Selective Color. It also supports external editing apps like Photoshop and Pixelmator, saving changes made in those apps.

    Improvements to Safari are coming, including speed enhancements and a new feature that puts a stop to data tracking. Siri in macOS High Sierra has expanded music capabilities and a new, more natural voice, and Spotlight supports flight status information. There are also improvements to iCloud, FaceTime, Messages, and Notes.

    macOS High Sierra is available only for registered developers, but Apple plans to make a public macOS High Sierra beta available later this summer, giving public beta testers a chance to try out the software before it sees a public release in the fall.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Hands-On With iOS 11: New Control Center, Redesigned App Store, Files App and More
    By Juli Clover - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Following Monday's keynote event, Apple released its newest iPhone operating system, iOS 11, to developers.

    iOS 11 won't be available for public beta testers until June and the general public will need to wait until the fall, but if you want to get a quick taste of what's coming in the update, check out our hands-on video below.

    Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

    There are subtle design changes throughout iOS 11, with a focus on bolder fonts and borderless buttons. One of the most significant design changes can be seen in the Control Center, which has been entirely overhauled with a new look, deeper functionality, and better customization.

    An entirely new App Store has been developed for iOS 11, and for the first time, apps and games are split out into their own sections. There's a "Today" view that's updated on a daily basis with recommendations, developer stories, and more.

    Files, a new app, mimics the Finder in macOS and makes it easier to manage files on iOS devices, and Siri has a new, more natural voice. Messages has a new app drawer to make it easier to use stickers and apps, and there's a new built-in person-to-person Apple Pay feature for sending money to friends.

    Maps includes indoor maps for malls and airports in select cities, and a Do Not Disturb While Driving feature is designed to keep users safe in the car. Apple Music features friend sharing, Photos includes new Live Photo editing options, and Notes supports handwriting recognition.

    Along with these new features, there are several changes that are specific to the iPad. A new bottom Dock has been added, for example, and that dock is accessible from anywhere with a simple swipe up from the bottom of the display. A new App Switcher on the iPad (accessed with a double swipe) shows a tiled view of all the open apps to make switching faster and more Mac-like.

    We'll have more videos covering iOS 11 features over the course of the week, so make sure to stay tuned to MacRumors.com.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Report Reveals In-App Purchase Scams in the App Store
    By Tim Hardwick - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    An investigation into App Store developer pay-outs has uncovered a scamming trend in which apps advertising fake services are making thousands of dollars a month from in-app purchases.

    In a Medium article titled How to Make $80,000 Per Month on the Apple App Store, Johnny Lin describes how he discovered the trend, which works by manipulating search ads to promote dubious apps in the App Store and then preys on unsuspecting users via the in-app purchase mechanism.

    I scrolled down the list in the Productivity category and saw apps from well-known companies like Dropbox, Evernote, and Microsoft. That was to be expected. But what's this? The #10 Top Grossing Productivity app (as of June 7th, 2017) was an app called "Mobile protection :Clean & Security VPN".

    Given the terrible title of this app (inconsistent capitalization, misplaced colon, and grammatically nonsensical "Clean & Security VPN?"), I was sure this was a bug in the rankings algorithm. So I check Sensor Tower for an estimate of the app's revenue, which showed… $80,000 per month?? That couldn't possibly be right. Now I was really curious.
    To learn how this could be, Lin installed and ran the app, and was soon prompted to start a "free trial" for an "anti-virus scanner" (iOS does not need anti-virus software thanks to Apple's sandboxing rules for individual apps). Tapping on the trial offer then threw up a Touch ID authentication prompt containing the text "You will pay $99.99 for a 7-day subscription starting Jun 9, 2017".


    Lin was one touch away from paying $400 a month for a non-existent service offered by a scammer.
    It suddenly made a lot of sense how this app generates $80,000 a month. At $400/month per subscriber, it only needs to scam 200 people to make $80,000/month, or $960,000 a year. Of that amount, Apple takes 30%, or $288,000?—?from just this one app.
    Lin went on to explain how dishonorable developers are able to take advantage of Apple's App Store search ads product because there's no filtering or approval process involved. Not only that, ads look almost indistinguishable from real results in the store, while some ads take up the entire search result's first page.

    Lin dug deeper and found several other similar apps making money off the same scam, suggesting a wider disturbing trend, with scam apps regularly showing up in the App Store's top grossing lists.

    It's unclear at this point how these apps managed to make it onto the App Store in the first place given Apple's usually stringent approval process, or whether changes to the search ads system in iOS 11 will prevent this immoral practice from occurring in future. We'll be sure to update this article if we hear more from Apple.

    In the meantime, users should report scam apps when they see them and inform less savvy friends of this scamming trend until something is done to eradicate it.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors