jahment holistic studies inc.

76-05 roosevelt avenue
jackson heights, new york 11372

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JUNE 28, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4424282

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - JAHMENT HOLISTIC STUDIES INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Do your supporters support you—or just one thing you do?
    Tuesday May 2, 2017

    Building a strong supporter base is one of the most important tasks for any nonprofit—arguably second only to achieving your mission. Without people to donate, volunteer, or take action, a nonprofit’s ability make a difference is severely limited.

    But exactly how you recruit new supporters can lead to problems down the road. Especially when nonprofits run campaigns around specific issues—or have a set of programs that address different problems but work toward a common goal—supporters can come to identify with the campaign or program they first encountered, rather than with your organization as a whole.

    This is an issue for a couple of reasons: First, any content you send these supporters that doesn’t focus on the work they have a connection to may feel irrelevant. And, as found in a recent study from Abila, a high number of donors say they may stop giving because of irrelevant content. It might feel like a sensible response to segment supporters so they only receive content you know will be of interest. But, few nonprofits have the resources to maintain this kind of communications strategy.  

    Besides, a supporter who cares about your overall mission is likely to have a much higher lifetime value. Here are a few strategies for building holistic relationships with your constituents:

    Build a solid house
    If you read this blog regularly, you probably know that Big Duck has been thinking a lot about brand architecture—a strategy for organizing and expressing the hierarchy of your brand. Too often, nonprofits fall into a habit of developing distinct visual identities or catchy names for their programs or campaigns. While making your initiatives stand out on their own isn’t always a bad thing, having distinct sub-brands makes it much easier for a supporter to identify with a program or campaign in a way that isn’t easily transferrable. This is of particular danger if these sub-brands differ in a significant way from your primary brand. If this sounds like you, it may be time to simplify how your initiatives are presented.

    Take them step by step
    The “ladder of engagement” is a communications framework we commonly use to think through strategies and tactics for getting the attention of someone who isn’t yet aware of your organization, converting them to become a supporter, and deepening their relationship until they are a true advocate for your cause. But this exercise can be helpful in achieving a variety of more specific communications goals, from how to connect the people you serve to a new program to how to identify and cultivate new board members to—you guessed it—how to bridge the gap between support for an initiative to support for your organization. Take a single afternoon to map out what you need to take supporters who don’t know your larger organization, make sure they’re aware of the bigger picture, and deepen their relationship until they’re eager to get out there and help broaden your community. Think through their motivations, what they’re looking for, and how you can reach out to them in ways that appeal to them—and, presto, you’ll have a roadmap for achieving your goal.

    Keep it together
    When you’re in the weeds at a nonprofit every day, it can be easy to forget how content may appear for someone who’s first encountering your organization. It may feel obvious how an initiative relates to your mission, or you may not think to mention your organization’s name because, well, the logo’s at the top-left corner, right? When developing content (even a new program name) it’s ideal to keep in mind how it will be understood to the least informed, most distracted reader. Making a point to always put your organization front and center and clearly explain how the initiative relates back to your mission will help you avoid a highly fragmented audience. For an example of this done well, take a look at the Food Bank For New York City’s financial empowerment services. The name, Food & Finances, tells you immediately that the program relates directly to hunger, and the landing page makes the connection more explicit in the second sentence.

    Get them when they’re paying attention
    Some people just aren’t going to take the time to explore your organization beyond the initiative they’ve engaged with. Sometimes you just have to go where they are and put the bigger picture right in front of them. Always referencing the organization name and connection to your mission is one way to do this, but it can take a bigger effort to get people to absorb your messages. When constituents take an action, they are highly primed to pay closer attention to what you have to say next. If there are events, volunteer opportunities, or advocacy actions associated with specific campaigns or programs, consider using the confirmation page and email to connect them with other initiatives or to your overall mission. Think about creating an online welcome series—a set of emails that are are automatically sent based on the date constituents take an online action. Include content that finds a dynamic way to explain your overall mission and how your various initiatives fit together. Or, if you have the bandwidth, build out a system of welcome series that are specific to the action in order to explicitly address how one program or campaign is in service of a bigger picture.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • The Need For A Holistic And Custom-built CRM In Health Care
    Wednesday May 3, 2017

    From retail to banking to hospitality, progressive industries are embracing advanced customer relationship (CRM) technologies to create positive and personalized experiences for consumers. Due to its overwhelming success, particularly in recent years, the CRM industry is booming with no sign of slowing down. In fact, according to Gartner, the CRM software market is expected to reach $36.5 billion this year, up from $26.3 billion in 2015.

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Health
  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • 'NY Times' Finally Joins Snapchat Discover
    Monday Apr 24, 2017

    Does The New York Times joining Snapchat Discover lend an air of respectability to a new platform, and breathe new life into an aging publisher? That's obviously what the partners are planning -- but only time will tell.

    Source: Media Post: MoBlog
  • IPC Media Now To Be Known As Time Inc. UK
    Thursday Sep 4, 2014

    IPC Media will undergo a rebrand by parent company Time Inc. to become Time Inc. UK, the company has announced. According to Time Inc. chairman and CEO Joe Ripp, the move will allow the company to better leverage its global presence. IPC Media counts more than 60 brands among its portfolio, including Country Life, What's on TV and Woman.

    Source: Media Post: Online Media Daily Europe
  • Time Inc. Cuts 300 Jobs
    Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    Time Inc., the nation's largest magazine publisher, announced a new round of layoffs and buyouts, affecting 300 positions or around 4% of the company's total headcount. Its shrinking headcount has been a bellwether for the travails of legacy print publishers as ad dollars shifted to digital media over the last decade.

    Source: Media Post: MediaDailyNews
  • Study Finds Two In Three Consumers Trust Branded Content More Than Traditional Advertising
    Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    A new study by Time Inc. reveals that two in three consumers trust branded content more than traditional advertising. With the study, Time Inc. sought to understand how GenZ, Millennials and GenX consumers respond to and engage with branded native and branded content and referred to both as "custom content."

    Source: Media Post: Video Daily
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page