island strong, inc.

146 highland avenue
patchogue, new york 11772

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 16, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4473756

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - ISLAND STRONG, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • What to Pack for a Galápagos Trip
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Snorkeling gear, a day pack and a sun hat are musts for a visit to the islands.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Subway Delays, Again, Disrupt Commutes; L.I.R.R. Will Offer Some Discounts
    By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    In what has become a seemingly weekly ritual, a series of problems cropped up across the city during the morning rush, including signal issues and a train with mechanical problems.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Shelter Island: A Long Island Vacation Destination
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    Shelter Island—an 8,000-acre island wedged between Long Island’s North and South Forks that can only be reached by boat or private plane—draws a moneyed crowd in search of a more laid-back vibe. Photo: Dorothy Hong for The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Worth It
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • Home Buyers Flock to Shelter Island
    Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    A five-minute ferry ride from the Hamptons, the 8,000-acre island offers a rich history, scant traffic and gentler prices.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Lifestyle
  • The elusive millennials: are they worth chasing?
    Monday Dec 5, 2016

    Ah, millennials—they’re the constantly SnapChatting young people with attention spans that shorten every day. (I’m allowed to say this because I’m one of them!) As millennials make up more and more of the workforce and their buying power increases, organizations are obsessing about how to get them to care about their cause—and ultimately how to get them to give.

    This obsession has led to tons of research about the generation, and after doing a little digging, I noticed that the research doesn’t always match up. For instance, MobileCause said millennials give to causes, rather than specific organizations or brands, but Inc. 500 found millennials to be extremely brand loyal compared to other generations.

    So what’s the deal? Do millennials care about a specific organization or not? And how does that affect their likelihood to give? Big Duck’s new market research tool, the Brandraising Benchmark, also digs into questions like these, and our June survey returned some interesting results about young people:

    1. 18-34 year olds had some of the highest levels of awareness of participating organizations. This means they were more likely than other, older age groups to claim that they’d heard of a participating organization. This was true for nonprofits large and small, and across a variety of sectors.
    2. When asked about the importance of participating organizations’ mission statements, 18-34 year olds were more likely than any other age group to say the mission was very or extremely important. Again, true for nonprofits of all sizes and a variety of sectors.
    3. When asked about their likelihood to donate in the future, 18-34 year olds were more likely than all other age groups to say they probably or definitely would donate. Again, true for organizations large and small, and across sectors.

    So perhaps all the obsession over millennials is warranted: they’re aware of what’s going on in the nonprofit sector and excited about donating. What’s more, they seem to be aware of specific organizations (not just the issues behind them), so they may pay more attention to your brand than you might expect.

    My biggest takeaway about all of this is that developing a brand that inspires connection is more important than ever. Think Nike or Old Spice, and think fast because this age group has a lot of organizations vying for their attention.

    If you want to know what millennials (and other demographics) think of your organization specifically, sign up for our Brandraising Benchmark.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits