image responsive design architecture p.c.

9 bernstein boulevard
center moriches, new york 11934

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 22, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4639739

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - IMAGE RESPONSIVE DESIGN ARCHITECTURE P.C.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Architects of Social Responsibility: Views of Humanitarian Architecture in Practice
    By Jason Schneiderman - Tuesday Jun 6, 2017

    What is the role of architecture in civil society, and how has the field’s involvement in humanitarian work changed the profession?

    The post Architects of Social Responsibility: Views of Humanitarian Architecture in Practice appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • Opinion Journal: London Bridge Attack: A Tipping Point?
    Monday Jun 5, 2017

    Editorial Page Editor Paul Gigot on Prime Minister Theresa May’s un-PC response to the latest terror atrocity. Photo credit: Getty Images.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Opinion
  • Don’t make it harder to get the attention you deserve
    Thursday Nov 3, 2016

    Even organizations with a well-developed and up-to-date brand sometimes overlook one essential element of a strong communications strategy: brand architecture.

    Brand architecture is the name we give to the complicated network of roles and relationships between your organization’s programs, initiatives, events, publications, spaces—all the things that you do, own, and are known for. You might refer to them as “brands” or “sub-brands.” Perhaps you don’t think of them as distinct entities with identities of their own. But your audiences often do.

    Most nonprofits have grown their brand architecture  in an ad hoc way—a clever event name here, an interesting icon there, a legacy group maintained from a merger. It may all seem like small stuff, but eventually it adds up to a big problem: a brand that lacks a coherent, purposeful narrative and fails to make a powerful and focused impression.

    Evidence of brand architecture problems pops up in the conversations you have with your team every day.

    “Should we put our logo on our Walk t-shirts?”

    When you have clear and purposefully maintained brand architecture, questions like this won’t be up for debate. If your event is closely branded with the overall organization, the logo will be thoughtfully incorporated into the visual standards you’ve established. If the event has a completely separate brand designed to reach a completely separate audience, the main organization logo won’t be appropriate—and everyone will be clear about that ahead of time.

    Either way, clear brand architecture saves you time, spares you headaches, AND ensures that the choices you’re making on the ground reflect a smart strategy. Win-win-win.

    “We need a separate website for this program.”

    Setting up lots of unique websites is usually a sign that your team has a tendency to think and communicate in siloes. When you maintain separate sites for each program or event, you give each one a distinct identity—and discourage people from seeing your work as many parts making up a coherent whole. You’ll have to work even harder to help them see the other great work you do and feel inspired support your organization overall.

    [Side note: this issue could also be a sign that it’s time to redo your website.]

    “Our gala is coming up in a few months: time to start thinking about a logo.”

    Sound the alarm! If your team is in the habit of making logos and coming up with names for lots of events or programs or initiatives, odds are good that you’re creating unnecessary confusion and weakening your overall brand impression.

    That’s not to say that you can’t have special treatments for certain programs or a distinct look and feel for your big event—but it’s important to be strategic about it. Well-developed brand architecture strategy usually includes clear criteria for when it’s appropriate to stretch your brand and how far (e.g., a customized name or theme might be okay—but not a separate logo).

    When you allow key programs to take on lives (and messages and audiences) of their own without thoughtfully connecting them to your organization’s overall brand, you’re missing an opportunity—and you’re making it all too easy to stay lost in the shuffle of great causes. Strategic brands with clear hierarchy, a consistent look, and a unified message have a leg up in a messy and inconsistent world.

    Any of these challenges sound familiar? If so, it might be time to step back and consider whether you have a problem with your brand architecture (it happens to the best of us—check out this helpful piece by fellow Duck Ally Dommu on some of the causes of brand architecture issues).

    On November 11, Sarah Durham, Big Duck's CEO, and Debi Goldberg, The Union for Reform Judaism's Director of Communications, will be speaking about brand architecture and sharing an in depth case study with tips. Details are online here, or just let us know if you can't make it and we'll share the resources.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Huawei Matebook X review: The cost of a Windows PC with a MacBook design
    By Valentina Palladino - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    Good in many ways, but you’re really paying for the Apple-like design.

    Source: Ars Technica
  • Brand Architecture: Our case study with the Union for Reform Judaism and other resources
    Wednesday Nov 9, 2016

    One of the big nonprofit communications topics that keeps surfacing this year is brand architecture. Midsize and larger organizations, in particular, are working harder than ever to connect the dots between myriad programs, events, and initiatives that have been too disjointed so they can communicate more clearly and cohesively.

    If this is a topic that’s surfacing at your organization, these blogs might be useful too:

    Don’t hesitate to give us a shout if you’re struggling to communicate cohesively across multiple programs and initiatives.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Listing of the Day: Mount Kisco
    Friday Jun 23, 2017

    Original architectural features of the 1927 house include hardwood floors, high ceilings, a grand center-hall staircase, crown moldings and five working fireplaces.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • A Winning Design for a New York Monument to Gay and Transgender People
    By JOSHUA BARONE - Sunday Jun 25, 2017

    Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that the artist Anthony Goicolea had been selected to design the monument in Hudson River Park in Manhattan.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • ArtCenter College of Design Receives $2 Million Gift
    By webmaster@philanthropynewsdigest.org (Kyoko Uchida) - Sunday Jun 11, 2017

    The gift from the Lowell Milken Family Foundation will bolster the work of the Hoffmitz Milken Center for Typography....

    Source: Philanthropy News Digest (PND)