identify your opportunities inc

9 nicklesburg rd #212
monroe, new york 10950

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
NOVEMBER 15, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4487740

County
ORANGE

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - IDENTIFY YOUR OPPORTUNITIES INC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Listing of the Day: New York
    Friday Jul 21, 2017

    The colonial-style home in Westchester, New York played host to the wedding of Marilyn Monroe and playwright Arthur Miller.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Most Popular
  • Ray Nutt Named CEO of Fathom Events
    By Reid Nakamura, provided by
    - Thursday Jul 20, 2017

    Owned by AMC Entertainment Inc., Cinemark Holdings Inc. and Regal Entertainment Group, Fathom Events is a domestic distributor of event cinema, including live performances, sporting events and classic films.“As CEO of Fathom Events, I look forward to growing Fathom’s existing program verticals and identifying programming opportunities that will bring new and exciting cinematic experiences to the big screen for our Fathom fans and benefit our content providers, all exhibitor partners, employees and shareholders,” Nutt said in a statement.“Just as movie theatres provide the best consumer experience for enjoying a movie, theatres can be a fantastic venue for other content,” said Adam Aron, AMC CEO and President.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • Man Killed in 9/11 Attacks Is Identified by DNA Testing
    By ASHLEY SOUTHALL - Monday Aug 7, 2017

    The man, whose name was withheld by officials at his family’s request, was the first Sept. 11 victim to be identified in more than two years.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • The Must-Do First Step in Creating a Profitable Fundraising Plan
    By Gail Perry - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    A fundraising assessment. A development office audit. A SWOT of your fundraising program.

    What are these things?

    They're the first step to creating a killer fundraising strategy that can unlock your fundraising potential.

    No kidding.

    Before you can create a strategy and a plan of execution, you have to step back and assess where you are.

    This is time to calmly, dispassionately take stock, examine what you have to work with, and evaluate how well things are working.

    A fundraising assessment gives you the opportunity to look at your fundraising program analytically.

    Without emotion. Without drama. No more crisis mode fundraising!

    A Fundraising Assessment can tell you a lot.

    • You can identify current successes and where you can build them up.
    • You can identify where the easy money might be that you are missing.
    • You can identify unproductive time wasters like certain fundraising events, that are not worth the trouble.

    5 Steps to a Thoughtful Fundraising Assessment

    1. Pull together your data.

    What does your data tell you?

    What are the trends?

    How about the numbers of current donors  - are they trending up or down?

    How about your donor renewal rates and donor attrition?

    Event attendees? How about the number of donors in your annual gift clubs?

    What about major gifts? Are you tracking Major Gift visits and asks?

    You know what I love about data? The numbers don't really lie. They are pretty straightforward, in black and white.

    Always start with the data when you want to make a plan. 

    2. Ask the tough questions.

    When you do a fundraising assessment you have permission to ask politically awkward questions.

    You can ask Cage Rattling Questions like:

    Can we be honest about what's working and what's not working?

    Are we wiling to ditch unproductive programs?

    You can get an entire list of "tough questions" to ask about your fundraising strategy in last week's post here.

    3. Assess each fundraising program's current results.

    Review all your various fundraising programs - mailings, events, major gifts, grants, corporate and foundation support, digital strategies. What results are you getting?

    • What's working well? What's working not so well?
    • What trends are on the rise?
    • What strategies are not paying off like they used to?

    You should be able to see where your opportunities might be if you shift your focus.

    You might be able to add resources somewhere and receive a significant jump up in revenue.

    Don't forget to assess other aspects that impact your fundraising success:

    It can be fun - and enlightening - to step back and evaluate everything.  Include your board in this discussion! 

    4. Identify your fundraising challenges.

    Yes, challenges are a part of life.

    If you want to know how much you can raise, you must be willing to acknowledge what's not working so well.

    • Are there people who are impediments to good fundraising?
    • What's NOT working? Where are you wasting time?
    • Are you losing too many donors each year?
    • Have you cut your fundraising budget and staff but not your fundraising expectations?
    • Is your staff totally run ragged?
    • Is your signature event losing steam?

    Just be realistic.

    Please.

    Wistful thinking is not going to raise your money!

    Being realistic will lead to smart decisions and planning.

    Being realistic will help you sleep at night too.

    Always try to turn your challenges into your opportunities!

    5. Identify your fundraising opportunities.

    Every organization has special opportunities. What are yours?

    Perhaps you have:

    • A great location in town.
    • A cause that is suddenly very popular.
    • Were you recently in the news?
    • A very popular gala or event.
    • A new CEO or leader.
    • New internet or social media talent joining your team.
    • Is your board suddenly interested in helping?

    Take a look around. You might find some surprises you can play up and run with.

    Sometimes amazing results can happen by building on opportunities.

    Can you form a coalition? Can you build on key relationships?

    Be alert. Be strategic. Be opportunistic, even.

    Maybe a key relationship can offer opportunities to catapult your organization to a whole new level.

    Pull it all together in your Fundraising Assessment.

    • How effective is our current fundraising plan?
    • Where can we increase your fundraising revenue streams?
    • Where do we need to focus time, energy and resources?
    • Where can we increase our efficiency?

    Bottom Line: What's holding YOU back from raising big money?

    I can help you answer these questions with my Highly Profitable Fundraising Planning Toolkit.

    You have a template to perform your own SWOT and Fundraising Assessment of your own program.

    You'll have a 10-Point set of checklists to help you determine where your best opportunities are.

    I'll help you step back from the weeds and look at how you can raise money in new and better ways.

    When you create a smart, strategic Fundraising Plan for the coming year, you'll be organized. You'll be happier. And your organization will raise more money!

    QUESTION: what are your challenges with your own Fundraising Assessment?

    Leave a comment and let us know!

     

    The post The Must-Do First Step in Creating a Profitable Fundraising Plan appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry
  • Identify Your Major Donors Today
    By Dan Shephard - Thursday Apr 27, 2017

    It’s no secret that major gifts impact the bottom line for small and emerging nonprofits. Even though major donors might make up a small segment of a nonprofit’s donor base, they account for a large percent of the total of gifts that come through the door. How do you define “major donor” or “major gift”?

    The post Identify Your Major Donors Today appeared first on Network for Good.

    Source: Nonprofit Fundraising Blog
  • Marine Corps Plane Crash: The Victims
    By THE NEW YORK TIMES - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Family members and friends have begun identifying many of the 16 American service members who died on Monday when their plane crashed in rural Mississippi.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
identify your opportunities inc monroe ny