hudson valley ice hockey officials group inc.

21 east hill road
woodbury, connecticut 06798

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 09, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4401246

County
DUTCHESS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - HUDSON VALLEY ICE HOCKEY OFFICIALS GROUP INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Living the Urban Life Upstate
    By KIM VELSEY - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    A New York couple who prefer to rent in the thick of things, even in a Hudson Valley town.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Fighting for the Right to Serve Ice Cream
    Wednesday Apr 4, 2012

    San Francisco is notorious for making it difficult to open and run small businesses. For Juliet Pries, who just opened The Ice Cream Bar in Cole Valley, it meant months of red tape and rent to realize her goal. Maggie Beidelman reports.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: SF Bay Area
  • Devils Take Nico Hischier No. 1, Defying N.H.L. Draft Predictions
    By JEFF ARNOLD - Saturday Jun 24, 2017

    Hischier, surprised that the Devils picked him over Nolan Patrick, becomes the first Swiss-born player to be selected first over all in the draft.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Needham Joins Final Nike/USL HSG Top 25 With Upset of Longmeadow
    By mschneider - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine
  • Silicon Valley Investors Flexed Their Muscles in Uber Fight
    By KATIE BENNER - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Start-up financiers have deferred boardroom control to founders in recent years. Travis Kalanick’s ouster indicates that could be changing.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Malls Struggle From Demise of Borders
    Tuesday Jun 12, 2012

    The collapse of Borders Group is not just bad news for bookworms, it is also an unwelcome development for investors in suburban shopping centers that used to be anchored by the bookstore. Kris Hudson has details on The News Hub. Photo: Kris Hudson/The Wall Street Journal.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Real Estate
  • State of the Art: Uber’s Lesson: Silicon Valley’s Start-Up Machine Needs Fixing
    By FARHAD MANJOO - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Travis Kalanick, who stepped down as Uber’s C.E.O., had many enablers who turned a blind eye to the company’s faults because it was growing quickly.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Attention, Affluent Marketers: Please Watch Out For The Gap Between Millennials And Luxury
    Wednesday May 3, 2017

    Based on recent questions we have received about what’s really going on with Millennial consumers and their viewpoints on luxury and upscale products and services, werecently conducted a qualitative research study, “Millennials: Their Current and Future Need for Luxury,” in collaboration with The Luxury Marketing Council of Connecticut –Hudson Valley.  

    The exploratory study’s primary purpose was to lay the foundation for a more comprehensive understanding of Millennials' luxury-related passions, values,and buying habits in significant luxury and upscale markets. This study included both an online survey of 46 respondents and an in-depth, 90-minute focus group discussion with five accomplishedMillennials (all from the eastern United States), concentrating on the following two topics: 

    • How Millennials describe luxury 
  • Their current and future need for luxury products and services and their rationale for their outlook

More so than in the past, this keyaffluent demographic, upscale Millennials, described the word “luxury” using such negative terms as “expensive” and “unnecessary.” Also, some key attributes ofluxury in the minds of the older generations — Gen-Xers and Boomers — such as “exclusive” and “designer” were not as important, if at all, to many of theMillennials. 

Given this scenario, brands that market to affluent and luxury consumers had better pay close attention to how Millennials view upscale and luxury products andservices. And when these less-than-positive descriptions come from Millennials — the future affluent consumers — how do they impact prospects for the affluent and luxury goods and servicesmarketplaces in the future?

This challenge is even more daunting since most Millennials in this exploratory study, when asked about their need for luxuries, answered that theydon’t need them. There were a few exceptions, as some respondents cited “quality” and “designer” as positive attributes of luxury. In addition, Chanel, Hermès, andRolls-Royce were all mentioned as notable and recognized luxury brands, so there is at least some name brand awareness among this younger generation. 

Notably, though, in thissurvey, not one American brand was mentioned as being among the top luxury brands. That said, this overall lukewarm interest in luxury is a clear warning shot across the bow of the affluent and luxuryworlds, and its implications call for more innovative approaches to making a case for upscale and luxury products and services among Millennials … or that case may well be closed.

Source: Media Post: Engage:Affluent