homeless veterans transition center, inc.

150 colonie street
albany, new york 12210

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 27, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4451209

County
ALBANY

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - HOMELESS VETERANS TRANSITION CENTER, INC.









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Help homeless, keep people housed, create more housing
    By Libby Schaaf, Ed Lee and Sam Liccardo - Sunday Jun 25, 2017

    Mayors of Oakland, San Francisco and San Jose have vowed to help homeless, keep people housed, create more housing While we work to transition unsheltered residents into supportive and permanent housing, the city is improving cleanups in and around encampments and adding health and hygiene services on site. Based on the lessons we learned from the Compassionate Communities pilot program, we are adding a dedicated encampment cleaning crew, as well as providing serviced portable toilets and trash pickup. The city is expanding outreach to those living on the streets and suffering from mental illness or addiction. [...] centers offer low-barrier-to-entry facilities with services that help homeless residents transition to self-sufficiency. A second Navigation Center will allow the city to bring an additional 300 residents a year into safe, supportive housing, doubling the number of residents we serve. While the new Navigation Center is being built, the city is working to identify an appropriate site to offer a Safe Haven Outdoor Navigation Center — an outdoor site with security, sanitation and intensive services to facilitate access to permanent housing and other supports. Thanks to two new voter-approved bonds, Oakland will have 12 times more money to create protected affordable housing than two years ago. Property owners subject to rent control now must petition the city to raise rents above the annual allowable increase tied to the federal Consumer Price Index. [...] every resident struggling with disabilities, mental illness or addiction deserves to be treated with dignity and care. The surge of opiate abuse and addiction on the street, decreasing support from the federal government for affordable housing programs and the generational lack of home building has placed the Bay Area in the position we are today. Last July, I created the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing, which has a singular focus of ending homelessness for every individual it touches. [...] we launched our Encampment Resolution Teams, whose mission is to move individuals from unsanitary living conditions to safe, stable situations. Among those will be the first Navigation Center tailored for individuals experiencing mental health issues and addiction. For families experiencing homelessness, we are adding nearly $2 million to open a new shelter and $3 million in rapid re-housing subsidies to avoid displacement. By the end of this year, we have vowed to end chronic homelessness among military veterans, and by 2019 we are committed to finding housing for 800 families experiencing homelessness through our Heading Home campaign. San Jose struggles to find dollars to build affordable housing in the nation’s most expensive construction market. Beyond the horrific human toll, we can quantify the cost: $62,473 per individual a year to house just 10 percent of the biggest consumers of fire and police response, emergency rooms and jails. After years of nonprofit and public agencies tripping over each other, we’ve found that a focused, coordinated approach to getting chronically homeless individuals housed benefits all. In 2015, the city of San Jose required market-rate developers to include affordable housing in their new developments and pay impact fees that will generate $20 million annually for the city. Housing Trust Silicon Valley leverages millions of dollars in philanthropy to finance affordable housing.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Opinion pieces
  • Philanthropy (Not Fundraising) Ends Veteran Homelessness in Montgomery County
    By Katrina VanHuss and Otis Fulton - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    Recently, I had a conversation with Debbie Ezrin, director of development and communications of the Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless. Debbie had commented on one of my blogs in such a thoughtful way that I simply had to get to know her...

    The post Philanthropy (Not Fundraising) Ends Veteran Homelessness in Montgomery County appeared first on NonProfit PRO.

    Source: Tactical Leadership Strategy for the Modern NonProfit
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • New Jersey Transit Train Derails at Penn Station in New York
    By MATTHEW HAAG and MAYA SALAM - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    There was no immediate indication that the derailment had caused any injuries or damage, but all New Jersey Transit and Amtrak trains were delayed at the station.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • BART directors’ day at the troubled Powell Street station
    By Michael Cabanatuan - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Near the end of Thursday’s BART Board of Directors meeting, the transit system’s elected leaders found themselves in the unusual position of staring at something not listed on the agenda: a small, fresh puddle of urine. BART directors usually meet twice a month in a clean, quiet, windowless board chamber in Oakland, but this time they took a field trip to Powell Street station to view its “challenges” — homeless people sleeping in hallways, intravenous drug users, rundown conditions, dirty floors and elevators and escalators used regularly as restrooms. “You can see, there’s fluid at the bottom,” said Paula Fraser, assistant chief transportation officer for BART’s San Francisco and Peninsula lines. Maintenance workers try to clean up soiled elevators as quickly as possible, Fraser said, but the problem is so pervasive that they’d need to post a janitor at the elevators full time to ensure their constant cleanliness. Thursday’s tour was attended by 50 or so people, who strolled out of the station’s Hallidie Plaza exit past a panhandler on crutches, and up the escalator to Market Street, where they viewed the nearby Decaux public toilet and heard about city plans to move more portable Pit Stop toilets near BART stations. [...] they heard from merchants and tourism experts who said the Powell Street station’s deteriorated conditions are a drag on business. Jessica Lum, of the Hotel Council of San Francisco, said guests often comment on the station’s lack of cleanliness and feeling of safety, and that they don’t see police officers at the station. Later in the tour, they strolled down a hallway lined with people sprawled out and sleeping on the floor, and then gathered in the center of the station to listen to a talk about homelessness. Experts discussed plans that BART has to work with Muni and the city to help homeless people find the help they need, and eventually find a better place to sleep. “We’ll talk with them, work with them,” said Scott Walton, manager of emergency outreach and services for the city’s Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. Another speaker was explaining a program to help keep low-level drug offenders out of jail, when a BART rider interrupted. Police Chief Carlos Rojas told him BART’s police department plans to increase its visibility in stations and on trains. Selhorst said later that he and his co-workers talk about how unsafe BART feels with aggressive panhandlers on trains and recent stories of robberies by gangs of youths.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Bay Area News
  • “It’s Shame On Us If We Blow It”: Highlights From NY Seizes the Momentum
    By Ben Fidler - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Mike Foley, a drug industry veteran and director of the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, has a pointed message for the New York life sciences industry: Don’t waste the moment. Changing the course of New York biotech has been a saga that dates back to the 1990s, and as Xconomy has detailed, progress has been made […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
homeless veterans transition center inc albany ny