highland place LLC

34 grove st.
sea cliff, new york 11579

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 10, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4386588

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - HIGHLAND PLACE LLC









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    The quiet community of Sea Ranch on California’s north coast offers many different styles of home, but none will compete with the beauty of the natural environment, with the ocean and gnarled trees bent in angles by the wind, with meadows and cliffs facing brilliant western sunsets. Still, a 1971 Charles Moore-designed abode could make

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  • Hiking and biking County Mayo, Ireland’s Wild West
    By Larry Habegger - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Just 15 minutes earlier, I’d been abandoned by my wife and two teenage daughters, who refused to join me on our afternoon bike ride when the heavy sky began spitting rain. County Mayo is the kind of place that visitors imagine when they think of rural Ireland: whitewashed stone houses in impossibly green fields dotted with sheep; rolling hills that tumble into the sea or break off in sheer cliffs; narrow winding roads that lead to villages with pubs and fish markets; residents with an admirable patience who are happy to take a moment to chat; small towns with cozy cafes and restaurants serving local fare. We strolled around Westport, a thriving town with shops that ably serve both the community and visitors, and enjoyed the cafes and tearooms. [...] mostly because of dumb luck, we climbed Ireland’s holy mountain Croagh Patrick on the annual pilgrimage day when tens of thousands of people make the ascent, some of them barefoot as a way to do penance. [...] you don’t have to be a pilgrim to join the conga line slithering up the holy mountain. A statue of St. Patrick marks the starting point to the climb, but to get there we had to run the gantlet of souvenir stands selling rosaries, candles, portraits of the pope, images of Catholic saints, prayer books and various trinkets. A welcoming sign read, PREPARE TO MEET THY GOD. Dozens of people milled about apparently contemplating just that while gazing up at the rocky trail sprinkled with confetti-colored specks that turned out to be distant hikers. Strangers called out words of encouragement as stones clattered under our boots and nylon rustled against nylon. Within minutes, the view opened up over the pastures and hills; islands dotted the silver sea below. Teams of paramedics relaxed around first-aid tents, ready for the inevitable injuries. Some say the annual rite began in the Stone Age 5,000 years ago when people climbed to mark harvest season; others say it started 1,500 years ago. Up and up we went, slower than some, faster than others, and stopped after an hour for a snack on a ridge, preparing for the next hour, which would be a steep climb up unstable scree to the summit. Clouds drifted in and partially obscured the view, but we could see the trail thick with people climbing, descending, passing each other along the way. On the steep climb, the rocks shifted with every step, and it would be easy to twist an ankle, especially in the crowd. Step by step we made our way up with our many fellow climbers, and before we knew it we were at the top, where groups posed for photos and in the chapel a priest was saying Mass at a window above the throng. A cloud had settled on us, and we waited in the chill, snacking again, congratulating ourselves and others, hoping to get the full summit view. [...] 15 minutes later, the sun broke out and I was skimming along the paved path through the pastures with the wild sky above and shimmering Clew Bay below. Later, when I decided I didn’t need to wear my rain pants anymore, I stopped to take them off and shoot a few photos. The Greenway opened in April 2010 through the efforts of the Mayo County Council and the agreement of the landowners whose property the Greenway crosses. Even though the right of way followed the defunct rail line of Midlands Great Western Railway, the county needed their permission. Since it opened, statistics show a peak of about 1,000 people per day using the path, with an overall average of about 250 people per day in the June-August high season. The Greenway has produced some 130 seasonal and 60 off-season jobs, 7 bike rental companies, and several cafes and restaurants in Newport, Westport and Mulranny. The county has plans to restore a railroad station at the Mulranny Park Hotel, create an interpretive center, improve the pathway surface in some places, and restore old railway cottages as shelters with toilets and refreshments. Just before Newport, it skirted then crossed an inlet from the sea over the arched stone Burrishoole Bridge, and I coasted downhill in glorious sunshine into town for coffee at the Blue Bicycle Tea Rooms. If the rain came, I’d be just another fool let loose on the wind, but I’d dry out in no time by the turf fire in our cottage, a cup of tea in hand and the green pastures and glistening sea outside the window. In the town center, Willow Cafe Tea Room serves simple meals of soups, salads, sandwiches, quiches and lots of baked goods along with excellent coffee and teas. Kelly’s Kitchen serves full Irish breakfast and lunches with locally sourced meats from the adjacent butcher (all in the family), who’s been serving the community for decades.

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  • LeBron James is fed up, and his ‘Decision’ may be made
    By Hannah Withiam - Monday Jul 17, 2017

    This time next year, LeBron James may not need to turn “The Decision” into a cliff-hanger — because the Cavaliers, more and more, are making it for him. The King’s frustration with the organization reportedly is nearing its tipping point as more chips fall into place around the league, leaving the 2016 NBA champions with...

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  • ‘Shark Drunk,’ by Morten Strøksnes
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    The photos are often grainy and fugitive, because the shark, being a Greenlander, likes it cold, in the shark’s case typically 4,000 feet under the water’s surface.The Greenland shark is the totemic protagonist of Norwegian journalist Morten Strksnes’s prime, digressive — a brand of free association that knows when to rein in — entertainment, “Shark Drunk.”Partaking of the flesh in its pristine state results in a feeling supposedly similar to taking in an extreme amount of alcohol or hallucinogenic drugs.Icelanders consider the flesh a delicacy once properly prepared, which requires “repeated boiling, drying, or even burying the meat until it ferments.”The elemental Why? anyone should choose to monkey around with the Greenland shark is that its liver is a vast repository of oil, and whale oil was a big thing for a good long time: to light lamps, make soap, and as a cooking oil.[...] he doesn’t treat it like some gonzo bizarrerie, but as chromatic, investigative work, one in which you can laugh instead of feel nothing but grim.Aasjord, on the other hand, has longtime family ties to the area — for many natives of which the shark has, understandably, shamanic qualities — so even a momentary communing with the creature would be a numinous experience.Luckily, Aasjord had found the perfect bait right before the weather would bring the light air and calm seas needed to fish from a rubber dinghy in “the deep, salty black sea ... cold and indifferent, lacking all empathy” for a shark that weighs as much as a Studebaker: the rotting remains of a fairly recently slaughtered Scottish Highland bull, waiting for them patiently in the summer warmth of a nearby field.Heroically, they gather the remains in garbage bags, and it is Strksnes’s job to chum; that is, to toss most of the bull remains into the water to arouse the shark’s olefactory interest.Most bioluminescence produced by various deep-sea species is blue, and blue light is the only color most of these species are capable of seeing.[...] the equally spooky sound of the sea’s underwater, “a deep humming that emanates from itself,” long sea swells creating trembles on the sea floor.

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    Source: New York Post: Business
highland place llc sea cliff ny