haiti education and resource team, inc.

p.o. box 683
selden, new york 11784

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 28, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4351700

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - HAITI EDUCATION AND RESOURCE TEAM, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • “Be Internet Awesome”: Helping kids make smart decisions online
    Tuesday Jun 6, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • “Be Internet Awesome”: Helping kids make smart decisions online
    Tuesday Jun 6, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • Who Decides Your Communications Workload?
    Monday Nov 28, 2016

    Kivi Leroux Miller is president of Nonprofit Marketing Guide.com and the award-winning author of two books, “The Nonprofit Marketing Guide: High-Impact, Low-Cost Ways to Build Support for Your Good Cause” and “Content Marketing for Nonprofits: A Communications Map for Engaging Your Community, Becoming a Favorite Cause, and Raising More Money.”

    Kivi and I share a passion and similar perspective about helping nonprofit communicators do their best work. Her Communications Trends Report is one of the few data-driven resources out there: I consider it a must-read. In this guest post, Kivi gives us a sneak peak into her most recent findings. - Sarah

    Who decides the priorities for your communications team and controls the workload?

    Do you know how that compares to other nonprofits?

    We are attempting to answer those questions for you in the 2017 Nonprofit Communications Trends Report.

    Based on preliminary results from more than 600 nonprofits, there’s no one clear answer.


    The most frequent response is that an integrated team of communications and fundraising staff jointly decide on the workload.

    But that’s followed closely by other models where the executive director determines the workload, where the communications department acts as an “internal agency,” and where the communications team itself defines its workload.

    Do you think the approach in your organization is under-represented or over-represented in these results?

    The survey for the report is open until December 2, 2016 and we want to hear from as many nonprofit communications staff as possible, so we hope you’ll take the survey and add your perspective.

    Everyone who takes the survey will receive a free copy of the report in January and be invited to a free webinar a week before the results are released.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Helmsley Trust Awards $1.3 Million to Improve Health Journalism
    By webmaster@philanthropynewsdigest.org (Matt Sinclair) - Monday May 29, 2017

    The grant will provide educational opportunities and resources for journalists reporting on healthcare issues....

    Source: Philanthropy News Digest (PND)
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Hitting the Books Behind Bars
    Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Team Trump should commit to providing inmates an education.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Opinion
  • Coursera Names Jeff Maggioncalda as New Leader
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Rick Levin is stepping down as chief executive of Coursera, handing over the reins of the online education company to former Financial Engines Inc. CEO Jeff Maggioncalda.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Technology: What's News
  • Three core ingredients that will help you ensure your new brand sticks.
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Have you ever invested a bunch of time and energy in a project but the work just didn’t stick? Take, for example, strategic planning. After months of deep thinking and hard work, it’s a shame when good work ends up sitting on the shelf in a binder, not actually getting implemented. There are few things more frustrating—and unfortunately commonplace—in the nonprofit world, when every day and dollar counts.

    When it comes to building a strong nonprofit brand—the type of brand that has equity, that stands out, and that inspires support—the work must take hold internally. Like the roots of a tree, the deeper and more established they are, the stronger and higher the branches and leaves can grow. If staff are not aligned internally or equipped with the right internal resources, chances are they will hit big roadblocks when trying to communicate externally, diminishing the consistency and expression of the new brand.

    Here are three core ingredients to help you build an enduring nonprofit brand that sticks—from the inside out.

    1) Brand team. Building and maintaining a strong nonprofit brand takes a village. Bringing the right people into the process and establishing their ownership of the new brand is integral to getting the work right and ensuring it sticks long-term. Staff, leadership, and other key stakeholders should be tasked with clear assignments and responsibilities, ideally from the very start of the rebranding process. Brand trainings and clear protocols for using the brand can help, and clear accountability post-launch. Trying to form the right brand team? Take a look at this blog post I wrote a few months back about getting through a rebrand with the right people on board. (Sarah also has some practical tips for engaging Boards in branding efforts.)   

    2) Brand tools. Your team also needs the right tools for your brand to stick. This starts with the development of a brand strategy, then the brand assets including a strong visual system and messaging platform. Take a look at Sarah’s primer on the elements that make up your brand and how to create a winning brand strategy. Translate those assets into accessible tools that your team can easily use and apply in their day-to-day work to make it easy to use for staff. This is where a great brand guide is useful, as well as an awesome image bank of pre-approved photography that helps tell your story visually, easy-to-use templates, boilerplate copy, elevator pitch, and other resources that staff, board, and other stakeholders can use to stay on-brand in their work.

    3) Brand culture. For a brand to stick, staff must believe in the relevance and power of branding as a strategy for nonprofits, and their own role in maintaining it. Without this fundamental belief in place, the work will struggle to take hold. Thoughtful stakeholder engagement during a rebrand process, followed by brand education and trainings post-launch, should be part of the equation. Consider a series of informal lunch-and-learn sessions in your conference room on the topic of communications. Circulate articles in advance like the ones we’ve referenced above, or consider watching a pre-recorded webinar like this one to jumpstart the conversation.

    Before embarking on your next big project—whether it is a branding initiative, communications strategy, or beyond—think through your plan for getting your efforts to stick. Your organization will need these three key ingredients: a brand team, brand tools, and a brand culture to make sure your rebrand truly takes root and endures. 

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits