h3 workshop inc.

67-c otis st.
west babylon, new york 11704

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 29, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4409990

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - H3 WORKSHOP INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The Hunt: A Private Roof Deck on the Upper West Side
    By JOYCE COHEN - Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    A couple wanted outdoor space, and found it, but at the top of a walk-up building.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Stonewall Inn Project to Preserve Stories Behind a Gay Rights Monument
    By SARAH MASLIN NIR - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    A $1 million grant will go toward conserving the oral histories of those who lived through the 1969 riots.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • After 50 years, a private company will revive NASA’s “wet workshop”
    By Eric Berger - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    A big challenge, but the payoff is incredible: essentially "free" space stations.

    Source: Ars Technica
  • Sheltered Workshops Increasingly under Public Scrutiny
    By Noreen Ohlrich - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    Deinstitutionalization and associated community and workforce integration trends are on the uptick throughout the world, but funding is lagging for alternatives. Sound familiar?

    The post Sheltered Workshops Increasingly under Public Scrutiny appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • It might be time to kill your newsletter
    Thursday May 11, 2017

    Ah - the nonprofit newsletter. That communications tactic that’s so ubiquitous that you probably can’t imagine life without it. Like sliced bread. Or kale in Brooklyn. From the days of twenty page printed quarterlies (mailed the old fashioned way), to 2017 when our subscribers spend a few seconds thumbing through our content on their mobile devices, if we’re lucky. The nonprofit newsletter is destined to stand the test of time. Right?

    I’m here today to make a potentially controversial statement: It’s time to say goodbye to the newsletter as we know it. Chances are your investment in it is simply just not worth the time and energy as it used to be.

    As you are well aware, developing a newsletter takes a lot: content sourcing, writing, designing, formatting, testing. It can take hours, days, weeks to assemble—with touches, input, and approval from countless people throughout the organization—inside and outside the communications team.

    Why do so many nonprofits take on the burden of producing the equivalent of a magazine a month that gets an average 1.5 percent click through rate and 14 percent open rate? Those figures are down from 2015, according to M+R's 11th Benchmarks Study of nonprofit digital advocacy, fundraising, social, and advertising. If your organization is in this predicament, it’s time for a new approach. This doesn't mean you should scrap the operation entirely (though it could)—but I bet there are some adjustments that you could make to get a better return. So, hold your horses, I’m not saying that the goal of your nonprofit newsletter isn’t important, I’m just saying that there are probably better [i.e. more efficient, leaner, and high-value] ways to achieve that goal.

    Before you pull the plug (or press pause on that enews that’s about to blast in an hour) here are some questions to help you think this through.

    What’s your enewsletter costing you?

    How much total time is your entire team spending on your enews? Don’t know? Add it up. Track it honestly (There are lots of free time-tracking tools you can use if Excel is not your friend). Once you have a rough figure, take a hard look at it and ask yourself “Is it worth it?”

    The time has come to approach nonprofit marketing with ruthless rigor. If you’re not already, you should ask yourself with every project—is the time and investment spent here a smart use of my limited resources? If you can look at that time calculation and make the case that it’s worth it, keep on trucking. If not, take steps to be more efficient.

    What’s the point?

    Every communications piece should be connected to a goal—the more specific the better. And the newsletter is no exception. You probably have several important goals for your newsletter—keeping your donors up-to-date, communicating impact, telling stories, putting a face to volunteers, showcasing exciting new programs, etc. And you 100% should keep in touch with your supporters, especially before fundraising asks. But take a step back and ask yourself, “is this newsletter in its current form the best way to achieve these goals?”

    Who do we want to read this piece?

    Knowing your audience is key. Ask yourself, who is our primary audience for our newsletter and what are they looking for? If you’re not sure, ask them. A simple survey to newsletter subscribers can go a long way. When it comes to communication, personalization matters. A recent study by Abila about donor loyalty reports that approximately 71 percent of donors feel more engaged with a nonprofit when they receive content that’s personalized to them. Investing all of your efforts on one-size-fits all newsletter may not be the right approach.

    What content do we need to deliver?

    We live in an age where good content matters. In that same study cited above, nearly 75 percent of donors say they might stop donating to an organization based on poor content, including vague, dull, or irrelevant content, and inconvenient formatting. With that in mind, your communications team should be in the habit of regularly developing content that will resonate with your audiences and assessing what channel is best for that content to be delivered. Maybe that one-size-fits-all monthly enews that takes weeks to assemble could be scrapped in place of shorter, more regular email updates or Facebook posts. Or perhaps you can build up your blog and treat your enews as a simple round-up of what you’ve already developed, segmented by audience type and emailing content to people in more targeted ways.

    Think through first what content you really need to deliver, and then put pressure on whether your newsletter is the best format to deliver it. (Need help? Check our Sarah Durham’s content planning and management workshop coming up this summer.)

    What does the data say?

    If you aren’t already, you should be keeping a close eye on how your enewsletter is performing. Try comparing your open rates and click-through rates to industry averages using M&R’s 2017 e-benchmarks. If your enewsletter is performing at or below average, there’s probably a good case to be made to approach it with fresh eyes.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Adam West: Batman Forever
    By Brian Raftery - Saturday Jun 10, 2017

    No actor ever managed to make the Dark Knight as delightful as the legendary actor.

    Source: Webmonkey
  • How Your Thinking Impacts Your Fundraising and Your Life
    By Gail Perry - Friday May 5, 2017

    Does your mindset really impact your life - and your fundraising results?

    I'd suggest that your thinking has tons to do with how your life rolls out.

    I co-presented this topic earlier this week at the AFP International Fundraising Conference with master fundraising gurus Lori Jacobwith and Marcy Heim.

    We had a blast pulling together our own personal mindset management tips to share - things that have helped us survive the bad times and ultimately flourish.

    I have to say I was quite impressed with our audience's reaction to this session.

    It's a bit "woo-woo" for all the straight-laced fundraisers at AFP.

    But everyone seemed to really enjoy it. A few people shared with me later that our session helped them pivot to a more positive place. (hurray!)

    Here is a bit of our presentation:

    How your thinking impacts your life and your fundraising results.

    1. You CAN change your thoughts.

    It's important for you to simply acknowledge that your thinking impacts how you FEEL inside.

    Where do many feelings come from? From thoughts that generate an emotional charge.

    If you are thinking happy, positive thoughts, you will find that you'll feel much happier.

    And if you are thinking sad or depressed thoughts, you'll find yourself sinking lower and lower into pessimism.

    If you are really aware of your thoughts - then you can change them.

    Think of a light switch - if a thought wanders into your mind that is unhappy, critical or diempowering, try saying to yourself -

    "Nope, I'm not going there."

    Try blocking it off and make yourself switch to something more positive.

    I keep little affirmations taped to my bathroom mirror.

    So every morning, I see cheerful reminders:

    "People love me when I am myself." (Hay House)

    "Today I spend lots of time thinking delightful thoughts."  (Hay House)

    “Joy is what happens to us when we allow ourselves to recognize how good things really are.” (Marianne Williamson)

    And I'm glad to brush my teeth looking at such positive thoughts. It's a nice way to begin and end the day!

    Take away: Pay attention to your thoughts, and make them as positive as possible.

    2. The Gratitude Game

    Have you ever noticed that when you start simply appreciating the things around you, that you feel better?

    If you want to instantly put yourself in a mindset of well-being and satisfaction, then try the Gratitude Game.

    Here's how you play it:

    Get a partner - your spouse, colleague, child or friend.

    Take turns saying out loud - something that you are grateful for.

    Go back and forth, sharing these happy thoughts.

    We played this game with the entire audience at the AFP Conference last week. People paired off, and just took turns sharing their gratefulness.

    You should have seen everyone's faces!

    Expressions changed. Smiles appeared. Happiness was everywhere. I was stunned at the transformation of people's faces.

    Last Thanksgiving, my family and I gathered around the dinner table. After saying grace, I suggested that we all take turns sharing something we were thankful for. We ended up going round and round, over and over, with each person sharing an appreciation.

    Wow! It might have been the happiest moment of the entire weekend!

    Check out this interesting article: 31 Benefits of Gratitude. It has links to many scientific studies about the benefits of this practice.

    3. Forgiveness as a Mindset Practice

    Forgiveness means letting go of grievances.

    We all have people who have hurt us. Situations that happened in the past that still ache and hurt.  Even health issues that continue to pester us. Can you let this all go?

    This practice is difficult!

    That's why they call it a "practice" - you have to practice it over and over!

    You could consider forgiveness as a spiritual practice. That's how I embraced it.

    The sages say that keeping anger festering against someone or something only hurts yourself. It doesn't hurt the other person.

    Self-forgiveness too!

    My own forgiveness practice has helped me forgive myself for many things. I've become easier on myself.

    We all have that inner critic who is "our own worst enemy." Well, if you practice forgiveness, it's easier to shut that mean inner voice down. :)

    The benefit of equanimity.

    Something else good comes out of this practice - you are better able to let go of things and people, and situations that rankle you.

    You develop more of a sense of equanimity, easiness and calm about life. You can take the ups and downs with a bit more of an emotional cushion.

    We all want to feel calmer, more peaceful. We all want to find happiness and joy.

    If you do, then start within. Cultivate your thinking and your attitudes, just like you are planting seeds.

    These practices are NOT easy, for sure.

    They take years, and even lifetimes!

    But they can make you a far more pleasant, positive and happy person.

    And then career success comes more easily. You become a person whom others want to be around. A person who is respected. A person who radiates an energy that helps others feel good.

    I don't know about you, but that's where I aspire.

    If you want to change the world, then you have to work within as well as without.

    I totally believe that positive emotions within help bring about positive situations.

    And this practice has certainly worked for me!

    BOTTOM LINE: You CAN Control Your Mindset - and Impact Your Life AND Your Results!

    What has been YOUR experience with mindset practices? What's worked for you? I'd love to know!

    Would you like more posts like this one - it's a bit out of the box for fundraising?

    ,

    The post Mindset: How Your Thinking Impacts Your Fundraising and Your Life appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry