goldenberg strategic recruitment corp.

40 field lane
roslyn heights, new york 11577

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 01, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4554275

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - GOLDENBERG STRATEGIC RECRUITMENT CORP.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Marine Corps Plane Crash: The Victims
    By THE NEW YORK TIMES - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Family members and friends have begun identifying many of the 16 American service members who died on Monday when their plane crashed in rural Mississippi.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Could the Rockaways Survive Another Sandy?
    By LUIS FERRÉ-SADURNÍ - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Residents are bracing for the worst, wondering whether measures taken so far are enough to keep devastation of the Queens community at bay.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • When your communications plateau, think like a clock restorer
    Tuesday Apr 25, 2017

    In the hit podcast S-Town, listeners follow the story of John B. McLemore, an eccentric genius living in rural Alabama. John is a horologist, someone who specializes in the scientific study of time. He has a deep expertise in making and fixing elaborate clocks.

    Most clock repairers approach their work tactically—they can manage to get an old timepiece working again by tinkering with a couple of its parts. The clock might start ticking like new, but it probably won't last too long. By contrast, the best, most sought after horologists, like John, are able to gain an understanding of the whole apparatus—reviving the full machine back to life as originally designed.

    The majority of nonprofit communicators approach their work tactically—like clock restorers who tinker with a few pieces at a time hoping to get the machine ticking. Many nonprofits hit plateaus with their communications efforts because they approach their work in this fashion. They tend to work on “one-off” projects as needed, rather than envisioning their organization’s communications as an interconnected system that should be optimized to reach its goals and support the mission. This might mean working on a new brochure without thinking about how it relates to the website or managing social media without considering how these platforms fit into their broader goals for engagement.

    More nonprofit communicators need to be able to think like expert clock restorers: able to see, build, and fix the whole machine. Approaching communications as a strategic mechanism comprised of interrelated tactics takes effort and investment upfront, but generates stronger results in the end. The website, emails, social media, and print collateral should all be part of an ecosystem of efforts that reinforce and support each other.

    Math For America (MƒA) is a great example of the benefits of building an integrated communications machine for recruitment purposes. MƒA’s fellowships for public school STEM teachers enable educators to hone their skills, collaborate with peers, and access leadership opportunities—all on a generous stipend. But ad-hoc marketing—a brochure, flyer, or email here and there—for their programs wasn’t filling the pipeline with qualified teachers. They had hit a plateau in recruiting qualified educators even though their program was almost too good to be true.

    Limited expertise in marketing theory and strategy meant that staff were creating promotional materials (ads, brochures, flyers, etc.) tactically instead of strategically. Limited knowledge about their audiences meant that Math for America didn’t know how they were being perceived by teachers or what was holding back candidates from applying (and which benefits would motivate them to).

    After researching to uncover what the opportunities and barriers might be from the educators’ point of view, we worked with MƒA to build an informed and motivating machine for their communications efforts. After a year, Math for America’s fellowship programs went from being under-enrolled to over enrolled. They saw a 358%(!) increase in applications for their Master Teacher Fellowship. And because MƒA’s communications team began to think of their marketing as a machine, they shifted away from tinkering with the tactical toward strategic approaches that offer a far greater return on investment.

    If you want to see greater results from your communications efforts, take time to assess (or build) your communications machine. Your best bet is to approach your work like a clock restorer specialist—methodical, strategic, and looking at the whole picture. Chances are you’ll have to tackle some big questions first and put more time in upfront to develop a strategy and plan that is uniquely designed for your nonprofit’s goals and audiences. But it will pay off in the end.

    Are your communications efforts hitting a plateau? Take a look at the whole machine.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Creating 'Strategic Content' For Search
    Tuesday Feb 14, 2017

    Search helps brands get found in a crowded marketplace, while content provides the opportunity to make connections.

    Source: Media Post: Search Insider
  • VentureBeat is hiring a strategic account director
    By Matt Marshall - Tuesday Jul 18, 2017

    VentureBeat is looking for a passionate and consultative sales professional to help sell big, custom campaigns and integrated marketing solutions to leading business and technology brands. The Strategic Account Director will help drive VentureBeat’s online, custom, and events business, already at the epicenter of the startup ecosystem and wider digital-tech revolution, to further heights. The […]

    Source: VentureBeat
  • Are you underestimating the power of communications?
    Tuesday Apr 4, 2017

    Busy nonprofit leaders tend to focus on the visible, tactical stuff of communications—the emails and tweets and mailings that go out into the world and bring back donors, advocates, and participants.

    What would be different at your organization if you viewed communications as an essential, universal strategic function instead?

    Thinking of marketing or communications as just a series of externally-facing tactics can be a big missed opportunity, because most of the power of smart communications happens behind the scenes—infusing your entire team of stakeholders with the skills and tools to express a consistent, coherent voice.

    Every person who works for your organization is a communicator on some level, whether they’re building partnerships with peers or relationships with participants or connections with advocates or rapport with potential hires. They need tools and strategic support to work at the top of their communications game, just like they need a computer that boots up properly in the morning and lights that turn on when they walk into the office.

    So what if we thought beyond the websites and brochures and instead treated communications as a key utility underpinning every aspect of a nonprofit’s work and mission?
    What if everyone at your organization looked to your in-house communications team for helpful, expert advice on getting the word out or inviting the world in?
    What if programs, development, HR, board, and leadership could all reach out to one, centralized resource for strategic messaging points or insights about how to engage a key audience?

    It would be transformative.

    Everyone’s efforts would become more efficient and effective. Your programs team would have better tools to recruit and advance your mission. Your board would become more effective ambassadors. You would develop close alignment between what you do, what you say, and how you say it.

    And once you’ve made sure your messages, visuals, and strategies all ladder up to and support your organization’s most critical priorities, you could step back and watch the clarity and focus flow through the communications team to every corner of your organization and out into the world.

    I’m not pretending it’s easy work.

    Assembling a skilled, well-structured team and evolving a culture that treats communications as the lifeblood of your organization is challenging and requires real investment. But wouldn’t it be worth it if you could make clear, effective external communications feel as simple and magical as turning on a light?

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
goldenberg strategic recruitment corp roslyn heights ny