global recruitment resources corporation

29 swan court
paramus, new jersey 07652

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 03, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4382844

County
NEW YORK

Jurisdiction
NEW JERSEY

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
FOREIGN BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - GLOBAL RECRUITMENT RESOURCES CORPORATION









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • 2017 America’s Charity Checkout Champions
    By asgro - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017
    Source: Tactical Leadership Strategy for the Modern NonProfit
  • Ur Hired: Canvas Helps Recruiters Interview Job Applicants Via Text
    By Sarah Schmid Stevenson - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    In the past decade, there has been plenty of handwringing in places like Indiana over the droves of talented young people leaving the state after graduation. Tech talent, in particular, tends to flee for the coasts as fast as possible, so it can be a challenge for homegrown companies to attract the attention of job […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • How recruiters are employing VR to impress candidates
    By Andrew Woodberry - Tuesday May 9, 2017

    According to a 2016 Deloitte survey, fully two-thirds of Millennials expect to leave their current jobs by 2020. What does that mean for human resources departments?A fluid and robust job market has made recruiting more competitive than ever. Connecting with potential employees, particularly Millennials, is not easy. Technology such as LinkedIn and Indeed has made identifying potential employees simpler, but convincing the best potential candidates to actually join a company has become more complicated. Younger potential employees crave authentic, interesting ways to learn about their future...Read More

    Source: ReadWriteWeb
  • Getting Women On Boards: Three Ways to Increase the Numbers
    By Jennifer Giottonini Cayer - Friday Jun 9, 2017

    The hot topic of getting more qualified women on corporate boards continues unabated. Recent statistics show how companies with women prominently serving in such capacities experience higher-than-average financial performance. A major investment group even declared earlier this year that it would push to get women on the boards of the companies in their portfolio. Yet […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • Allison + Partners Names Weatherbee SVP Of Talent Search
    Wednesday Apr 9, 2014

    Allison + Partners has named Alan Weatherbee as its senior vice president of talent search. Weatherbee, who will be based in Boston, was previously vice president of human resources for ConeCommunications. Prior to Cone, Weatherbee was director of recruitment for IPG agencies GolinHarris, Weber Shandwick and Rogers & Cowan.

    Source: Media Post: MAD Boston
  • Four ways a strong brand can drive corporate giving
    Thursday Feb 23, 2017

    A strong brand provides countless benefits for nonprofit fundraising programs. It helps organizations stand out from their peers, focuses fundraisers and other communicators on the messages they need to drive action, and provides the vision for a better future that inspires supporters to give.

    A strong brand can also give you the edge you need to attract corporate donors. With $24.5 billion donated by corporations last year, that’s no small consideration. Here are four ways that your brand can help support your corporate giving program:

    1. Trust
    A clearly defined brand will help your organization generate stronger, more trusting relationships with your supporters, a key ingredient in building engaged communities. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs want to do good, but they also want to promote their own brand and connect with consumers. If your audience is highly engaged, corporate donors can feel confident that their support will get noticed. Because people like to support companies that do good, a recognized connection with your organization can help them build trust and find new, loyal customers within your community.

    2. Reliability
    Corporate donors want to support good causes, but they also know that the nonprofit they choose to associate their brand with reflects back onto them. So, it is equally true that the values associated with a nonprofit brand will reflect on your corporate donors, and if your brand isn’t sufficiently professional or reliably expressed, you are starting at a disadvantage.

    3. Clarity
    CSR programs operate based on defined philanthropic priorities, which are typically selected based on the causes’ affinities with the company’s business interests. For example, Disney’s corporate citizenship program focuses on causes benefiting children. Other companies, like Google, that focus on organizations using technology to combat a range of issues, can get fairly niche. Having a clear mission statement—which is a core piece of your brand identity—as well as key messages articulated in concise language will help you appeal to a CSR team.

    4. Personality
    Well-defined brands, whether nonprofit or corporate, express a clear personality that helps them to distinguish themselves. Corporations prefer to support organizations that align with their brand’s personality, so having a distinct personality that aligns with a corporate brand can make your nonprofit more attractive.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • 3 Ways to Hire and Retain the Best Nonprofit Communicators
    Wednesday Feb 15, 2017

    Savvy communications directors with deep expertise and track records of success in larger nonprofits are, in my experience, a bit like the Painted Bunting who unexpectedly took up residence here in Brooklyn recently; rare birds that can be difficult to attract, spot, and head south for the winter too soon. When the right person applies to work for you and stays, spearheading game-changing communications projects year after year, you’ve hit the jackpot.

    Here are three ways you can hire and retain the best nonprofit communicators:

    Want a pro? Hire a pro.
    It sounds funny to say, but if you want an expert communications director, you need to actually hire one. That often means resisting the urge to promote that programs person who you think is a good communicator just because they’ve worked at your org for awhile and “get it.” Try to avoid hiring that great person from the corporate world who comes without nonprofit experience too. Instead, recruit people with solid backgrounds working in nonprofit communications already so they can bring their knowledge of the sector, strategy, and skills with them.

    Kivi Leroux-Miller and I recently collaborated on a study of successful in-house communications teams that revealed that hiring expert nonprofit communications professionals was a critical factor. (Download our ebook “What it Takes to Be Great: The top five factors of successful nonprofit communications teams” here).

    Big team? Invest in a strong second-in-command.
    I recently invited a handful of senior communicators at nonprofit organizations with operating budgets of 100 million dollars or more to meet each other over breakfast at Big Duck and share how their teams are structured. While each nonprofit’s communications team varied in size (from 1.5 to 14 full-time employees!) the directors in the room who seemed the happiest (and calmest) all had one thing in common: a strong second-in-command.

    Senior-level communications pros don’t want want to do it all themselves, and they know it’s not a good use of donor dollars if they do. A strong Number Two gives your communications director the ability to step out of the weeds of managing every project, focus on setting priorities, and work more on the high-value projects. This generates greater value for the nonprofit, who’s likely paying that director a six-figure salary, and pushes down the day-to-day communications work to people who are less expensive, just starting their careers, and need to build these skills. It also provides your organization with a working succession plan if your director leaves.
    ?These Number Two spots are great opportunities to develop rising stars—and a more appropriate place for someone who’s entering your organization from the corporate sector or another department. They can be mentored by the Director while getting hands-on experience assuming management responsibilities.

    Lots to do? Set priorities and be ruthless.
    Communications teams have important strategic work to do: raising awareness, changing hearts and minds, engaging donors or members, recruiting participants to programs, strengthening the brand experience, and more. This work can take years to do successfully and well; it requires planning, budgeting, buy-in,methodical oversight, and execution.

    At the same time, many communications teams also function as an internal agency. They are asked to create flyers for events at the last minute, help a department finesse and send an email out, and more to accommodate projects on short notice. This work is important too, but it’s often reactive and more tactical. It’s the sort of urgent (but not always important) work that eats up time from the important (but not always urgent) work of proactive, strategic communications.

    That seasoned director you hope will build a nest for years to come will fly away fast if she’s burdened with an unreasonably long list of tasks, murky priorities, no resources for managing more production-based assignments, and left without time to advance the projects where she and her team might add the most value.

    In our ebook, “What it Takes to Be Great: The top five factors of successful nonprofit communications teams,” we confirmed that successful communications teams rely not only on a clear set of priorities, but also the support of leadership who empowers them to be able to say no. At my roundtable of communications pros at large nonprofits there was consensus about this, too.

    If priorities aren’t clear, consider labeling every project your department works on in one of these three ways:

    Fire-extinguishing: these projects and tasks are typically urgent, time-sensitive, and often crisis-driven. They tend to be tactical and often have little or no long-term ROI. For example, fixing your board chair’s misspelled name on that big mailing you’re about to do.

    Optimizing: these projects and tasks usually involve making processes, systems, and tools better. For instance, upgrading Constant Contact to something more state-of-the-art and powerful like Salesforce, or building a better website.

    Seed-planting: these projects and tasks are the essence of important/not urgent work. They won’t bear fruit for some time, but when they do, you’ll feel great. For instance, researching and preparing a 3-year plan for your communications team that builds off of your organization’s strategic plan, includes a budget, and culminates by tackling a big project (such as a rebranding you know you should do but can’t happen soon).

    Labeling these projects and tracking them in a project management system like Basecamp (or even on post-its on your wall) will help you get a clearer sense where your team’s time actually goes. Better yet, consider reviewing how many and what sort of fire-extinguishing, optimizing, and seed-planting projects you’re working on regularly with your boss so you can make sure you’re aligned.

    Looking for more? Just reach out.
    If you’re a CEO searching for your own Painted Bunting at a mid-size or larger organization, contact us. We might be able to help.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Exxon Mobil Lends Its Support to a Carbon Tax Proposal
    By JOHN SCHWARTZ - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    The company is joining other oil companies and corporate giants to endorse a plan from the Climate Leadership Council to tax fossil fuels and pay the dividends to taxpayers.

    Source: NYT > Home Page