fundacion para ninos y jovenes unidos por un mejor futuro inc.

187 wolf road, suite 101
albany, new york 12205

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 02, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4382492

County
BRONX

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - FUNDACION PARA NINOS Y JOVENES UNIDOS POR UN MEJOR FUTURO INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • De Blasio wants lawmakers to go back to Albany to cut schools deal
    By Associated Press - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Mayor Bill de Blasio is demanding that state lawmakers return to Albany to extend his control over New York City schools before it expires June 30.The Democrat said on WNYC radio Thursday that...

    To view the full story, click the title link.

    Source: Crain&apso;s New York Business
  • Deal on mental health bill comes down to the wire in Albany
    By Jonathan LaMantia - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    State legislators this week will determine the future of the soon-to-expire Kendra's Law, which permits court-ordered community-based treatment for people with serious mental illnesses.The state...

    To view the full story, click the title link.

    Source: Crain&apso;s New York Business
  • The Big Business Of Police Tech
    By Alex Pasternack - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    Beyond Axon, myriad companies are changing the way police do business. Here’s a look.

    A flood of post-9/11 money and advances in computing have given rise to an arsenal of new tools for law enforcement. The emerging focus isn’t on weapons or armaments, but on data. Axon, the Arizona-based police giant that started by making Tasers, wants to use its body cameras as the front-end to an automated, cloud-based ecosystem for police evidence and analytics. It’s only the most attention-getting company among a range of firms big and small now competing for millions of dollars in public contracts by disrupting the way cops do business. The pitch: Upgrade how police respond to emergencies, conduct surveillance, manage data, and improve their communications—both with each other and the public.

    Read Full Story

    Source: Fast Company
  • Tax incentive to boost diversity in the TV business passes in Albany
    By Miriam Kreinin Souccar - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    A bill to encourage diversity among TV writers and directors passed yesterday in both the New York state Senate and Assembly, as expected.The legislation sets up a $5 million incentive program to...

    To view the full story, click the title link.

    Source: Crain&apso;s New York Business
  • An Equity podcast shot: Unpacking the Amazon-Whole Foods deal
    By Alex Wilhelm - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

     We’ve got an Equity Shot for you, an irregular extra hit from the Equity podcast crew. Today the big news is the potential Amazon-Whole Foods deal, which has led to rampant media speculation, depressed grocery stocks around the nationĀ and allegations of intelligent corporate strategy. It’s the sort of day that forces you to sit back and re-cast your views of the technology world.… Read More

    Source: TechCrunch
  • Heresy, founded by ex-Stack Overflow Europe MD, wants to help sales teams close with better data
    By Steve O'Hear - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

     Heresy, a startup co-founded by Dimitar Stanimiroff, who was previously MD Europe at Stack Overflow, is a new sales tool designed to increase collaboration between sales team members, and help them make better data-driven decisions, collectively and individually, and ultimately close more sales. Read More

    Source: TechCrunch
  • Kirk Douglas on Surviving a Childhood Home With Little Food and No Heat
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    The award-winning actor, now 100, lived in poverty in Amsterdam, N.Y.; then a friendship led him to Hollywood

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Lifestyle